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Angela's Ashes: A Memoir
Angela's Ashes: A Memoir
Angela's Ashes: A Memoir
Audiobook (abridged)4 hours

Angela's Ashes: A Memoir

Written by Frank McCourt

Narrated by Frank McCourt

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

3/5

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About this audiobook

When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood.

So begins the luminous memoir of Frank McCourt, born in Depression-era Brooklyn to recent Irish immigrants and raised in the slums of Limerick, Ireland. Frank's mother, Angela, has no money to feed the children since Frank's father Malachy, rarely works, and when he does he drinks his wages. Yet Malachy does nurture in Frank an appetite for the one thing he can provide: a story.

Perhaps it is a story that accounts for Frank's survival. Wearing shoes repaired with tires, begging a pig's head for Christmas dinner, and searching the pubs for his father, Frank endures poverty, near-starvation and the casual cruelty of relatives and neighbors -- yet lives to tell his tale with eloquence, exuberance and remarkable forgiveness.

Imbued with Frank McCourt's astounding humor and compassion -- and movingly read in his own voice -- Angela's Ashes is a glorious audiobook that bears all the marks of a classic.

LanguageEnglish
Release dateApr 1, 1998
ISBN9780743541596
Angela's Ashes: A Memoir
Author

Frank McCourt

Frank McCourt’s first book, ‘Angela’s Ashes’ won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award; it has sold 1.3 million copies in its Flamingo editions alone and tens of millions world-wide. For many years a writing teacher at Stuyvesant High School, McCourt performed with his brother Malachy in a musical review about their Irish youth. He lives in New York.

Reviews for Angela's Ashes

Rating: 3.0829911019849416 out of 5 stars
3/5

5,844 ratings199 reviews

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  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Born in Brooklyn in 1930 to recent Irish immigrants Malachy and Angela McCourt, Frank grew up in Limerick after his parents returned to Ireland because of poor prospects in America. It turns out that prospects weren't so great back in the old country either--not with Malachy for a father. A chronically unemployed and nearly unemployable alcoholic, he appears to be the model on which many of our more insulting cliches about drunken Irish manhood are based. Mix in abject poverty and frequent death and illness and you have all the makings of a truly difficult early life. Fortunately, in McCourt's able hands it also has all the makings for a compelling memoir. Won 1997 Pulitzer prize for Biography or Autobiography.Despite the difficult conditions of his childhood, McCourt manages to inject humor into this memoir. Very compelling.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    To hear the author read his Pulitzer Prize winning novel, in his distinctive Irish accent, made this book very intimate. Although his childhood was incredibly sad, Frank McCourt was able to tell some memories with humor. When he would sing the songs his drunk father sang, I couldn't help but smile. The audio of this book is simply amazing.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    This book was written brilliantly. The life of Frank McCourt was grim with an irresponsible drunk father in already miserable Limerick, Ireland. However, this memoir was also funny in a sad way because of how innocent McCourt was going through his day to day life, with hope. Love it to the end.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    This book was amazing. It changed my view on just about everything. It made me appreciate where i came from more.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    A funny yet tragic memoir of growing up in poverty in Ireland. While the overall world of Frank McCourt's childhood is seriously depressing, he manages to tell stories that have a hopeful tilt. I really liked Angela's Ashes.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I do believe I'm the last person on earth to have ever read this book and everyone but I got the memo that it's brilliant and awe-inspiring and I wish I could write trains of thought without punctuation so majestically as Mr. McCourt.It's not going to blow anybody's mind to say that I loved this book. It rips your heart out, it really does. When Frank had to lick leftover newspaper from his uncle's fish and chips wrapper, that's how desperately hungry and at the bottom of the barrel he was, my gut wrenched. His poor mother, losing three babies and married to man addicted to the drink and so far gone into the addiction that he can't see (or refuses to see) that his family needs the money for literal survival. Poor Frankie and his brothers, all of them sweet and good and somehow able to be positive in the most desperate of situations, the way only children can. How terrible that his own aunts and uncles and grandmothers treated him with disdain for the sole reason that his mother married a man from the North.What a tragic childhood.Yet at the same time, I wonder if Mr. McCourt found his childhood to be tragic. As a child, did he think he had it terribly? He knew his family were dirt poor (literally), he watched as his mother lost three children, he stood by his mother as she weeped over her husband who continued to let his family down, but Frank and his brothers were able to find happiness and light in the darkest of places and times, such is the resilience and power of a child's mind.If ever there were a book that forced you to be grateful for everything you have, grateful that you have a bed, your own toilet, shoes, food and that you don't have to lick the grease off a newspaper to stave away the hunger, this book is it.Bring on 'Tis and Teacher Man.