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Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison

Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison

Written by Michel Foucault

Narrated by Simon Prebble


Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison

Written by Michel Foucault

Narrated by Simon Prebble

ratings:
4/5 (17 ratings)
Length:
13 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 23, 2013
ISBN:
9781452685564
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Two hundred and fifty years ago, a man condemned of attempting to assassinate the King of France was drawn and quartered in a grisly spectacle that suggested an unmediated duel between the violence of the criminal and the violence of the state. This groundbreaking book by Michel Foucault, the most influential philosopher since Sartre, compels us to reevaluate our assumptions about all the ensuing reforms in the penal institutions of the West. For as Foucault examines innovations that range from the abolition of torture to the institution of forced labor and the appearance of the modern penitentiary, he suggests that punishment has shifted its focus from the prisoner's body to his soul-and that our very concern with rehabilitation encourages and refines criminal activity.



Lucidly reasoned and deftly marshaling a vast body of research, Discipline and Punish is a genuinely revolutionary book, whose implications extend beyond the prison to the minute power relations of our society.
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 23, 2013
ISBN:
9781452685564
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Michel Foucault (1926-1984) was acknowledged as the preeminent philosopher of France in the 1970s and 1980s, and continues to have enormous impact throughout the world in many disciplines. His books include The Government of Self and Others, The Courage of Truth, The Birth of Biopolitics, and The Punitive Society.



Reviews

What people think about Discipline & Punish

4.1
17 ratings / 7 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    The few chapters I read for school were interesting. Might come back to read the whole book sometime.
  • (4/5)
    Foucault is a historian, at least a his-story-ian. and this is an interesting story. take the soul out of the prisoner, the atrocities of the execution, the discipline and punishment pre 1847 when peasants enjoyed the spectacle of watching a man have his limb's ripped apart for killing another man. this is good writing.
  • (3/5)
    not the easiest read, I grant you, but indispensible history (both social and as a business) of "corrections"
  • (4/5)
    Foucault relates developments in prisons and punishment with larger trends in culture and civilization. He argues that ancient regime punishment of the body evolved into punishment of the mind or spirit. He relates these changes to capitalism.
  • (4/5)
    Indeholder "The body of the condemned", "The spectacle of the scaffold"."The body of the condemned" handler om ???"The spectacle of the scaffold" handler om ???Foucault's syn på fængsling og henrettelse.
  • (4/5)
    It’s easy to understand why Foucault was such an influential theorist; his explanation of the use of information collection and standardization to work on the body, in places from prisons to hospitals to armies to schools, offers a powerful theoretical apparatus with lots of applications across countries, times, and situations. That said, if you’ve read summaries elsewhere, it’s not clear to me that you need to read this book (cf. Bowling Alone). One very striking thing to me, since I also just finished Matt Taibbi’s The Divide, was how much these two books described the exact same thing: the extension of categorization, surveillance, and manipulation to poor people, who gain “identity” by being classified and recorded. By contrast, rich people gain identity (and even acclaim) by being above the law—that’s not Foucault’s focus, but he mentions it. Thus the modern army and modern capitalism go hand in hand.