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UnavailableWhite Witch, Black Curse (Rachel Morgan / The Hollows, Book 7)
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White Witch, Black Curse (Rachel Morgan / The Hollows, Book 7)

Written by Kim Harrison

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin


Unavailable in your country

White Witch, Black Curse (Rachel Morgan / The Hollows, Book 7)

Written by Kim Harrison

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin

ratings:
4/5 (53 ratings)
Length:
18 hours
Released:
Aug 30, 2012
ISBN:
9780007493852
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The 7th stirring instalment of the urban fantasy-thriller series starring Rachel Morgan. A pacey and addictive novel of sexy bounty-hunting witches, cunning demons and vicious vampires. Rachel Morgan, kick-ass witch and bounty hunter, has taken her fair share of hits, and has broken lines she swore she would never cross. But when her lover was murdered it left a deeper wound than Rachel ever imagined, and now she won’t rest until his death is solved… and avenged. Whatever the cost. Yet the road to hell is paved with good intentions, and when a new predator moves to the apex of the Inderlander food chain, Rachel’s past comes back to haunt her. Some wounds take time to heal but some scars never fade.

Released:
Aug 30, 2012
ISBN:
9780007493852
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Kim Harrison is best known as the author of the #1 New York Times best selling Hollows series, but she has written more than urban fantasy and has published more than two-dozen books spanning the gamut from young adult, accelerated-science thriller, several anthologies, and has scripted two original graphic novels set in the Hollows universe. She has also published traditional fantasy under the name Dawn Cook. Kim is currently working on a new Hollows book between other, non related, urban fantasy projects.


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What people think about White Witch, Black Curse (Rachel Morgan / The Hollows, Book 7)

4.0
53 ratings / 43 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    More greatness. I can see Rachel developing as a person and changing. But still being her at her core. The ending was pretty great - Al is still one of my favorite villains. Except maybe he's less of a villain now. Still not a nice guy, but that's something Kim Harrison does well in these books. It's less that there are any bad guys versus good guys. Just people of different species trying to live their lives. I may slow down a little on this series, as there is such a thing as too much of the same, but I'll be back to it, no worries.
  • (4/5)
    Still not getting over Kisten. What can I say, I really liked the guy and I liked how Rachel was with him. She doesn't have the best track record with relationships (see Ivy for a perfect example) but with Kisten she seemed to let go of some of her issues.

    Speaking of Rachel's issues, y halo thar, Pierce. I've read the short story he featured in and I can completely understand how he's her standard for a man. It isn't just him or his behaviors, it's all tied into her father, because when she first conjured Pierce's ghost she was hoping to get her dad. Pierce was part of her first big magical adventure and part of one of her biggest sadnesses (that of not being able to see her father again). He means a lot to her.

    I also really liked the banshee plotline. I've been fascinated with their portrayal in the Hollows since a short story and I liked getting another look at them. Trying to raise the banshee child as something other than a predator is interesting, though it may ultimately be futile.

    It was a bit horrible finding out who killed Kisten and why. It truly was a business transaction, and it was someone from Ivy's past who we read about in a short story. It was a horrible person (vampire) doing horrible things because another horrible vampire (Piscary) allowed it. Kisten was nothing but a pawn and that really hurt. I've read reviews looking for some grand resolution or some "meaningful" death, but death isn't meaningful and this hurt way more.

    I'm noticing that the things I liked came out of short stories, so I should note here that if you haven't read the short stories I suspect you'll be floundering.
  • (3/5)
    White Witch, Black Curse
    3 Stars

    Rachel Morgan continues her quest to regain her memories and learn the identity of the undead vampire responsible for the death of her lover, Kisten. In addition, she becomes involved in an FIB investigation into an attack perpetrated by one of The Hollows most dangerous supernatural creatures - a banshee, and also finds herself confronting a literal ghost from her past. Can Rachel unravel these mysteries without losing her soul or her life in the process?

    Another installment in The Hollows series that feels more like filler despite the occasional plot twist or rare moment of character development. It should be noted that many of the story elements in this book have their basis in the different short stories associated with the series. As someone who refrains from reading these novellas, this is exceedingly annoying. It is disingenuous of authors to include important details in these shorts as many readers either choose not to read them or do not have access to them at all.

    But on to the actual book...

    To begin with, Harrison's banshee is nothing like its namesake from Celtic mythology (i.e., a female fae who heralds the death of a loved one with a keening cry); instead it is more of a succubus that drains its victims life-force in order to survive. Whether this discrepancy is deliberate or not, it results in a tedious and repetitive narrative in which Rachel repeatedly gets her ass handed to her by the more powerful creature.

    Similarly, the search for Kisten's killer is comprised of one dead end after another, and the eventual revelation is uninteresting and anti-climactic (probably due to the fact that I did not read the short story that constitutes background for this information). Moreover, Rachel and Ivy are still caught up in their irritating melodrama, which really needs to end already.

    While Al and Jenks do provide some much needed comic relief after some of the more emotionally intense events, Rachel's love life is as disappointing as ever. Marshall (who was never a real contender anyway) is revealed to be a weak willed coward; Trent is missing in action for most of the book, and the newcomer, Pierce (another character from a novella - argh!), gives off a profoundly smarmy vibe.

    In sum, while the fact that I have made it this far into the series without giving up would suggest that I am more forgiving of the weaker aspects of the characters and the storytelling, White Witch, Black Curse really does not live up to expectations. As always, I am hopeful that the next book will live up to the tremendous potential of the series.


  • (3/5)
    I like this series a lot., however, this particular book took me forever to read. It just didn't have the same zing for me as her others in this series.
  • (4/5)
    good quick read
  • (3/5)
    Warning: this review contains spoilersI was disappointed with this book. It felt like there were far too many things going on at once and so it lacked a coherent focus. Rachel is trying to find Kistin's murderer, tag a banshee, and deal with Al/save Pierce. It's not unusual for there to be multiple threads in Harrison's books, the problem is that this time Rachel's not focused on what is supposed to be her primary run. She's proactive the first time she gets the call, but after that she doesn't do anything until she's called in and then it's to refuse to help. Kistin's murder feels like a bookend, it's the focus of the beginning and the end of the book. Rachel is actively pursuing it in the beginning but then it gets pushed to the side and Ivy is the one doing the investigating. I felt like it got shortchanged, which is unfortunate. I think the person who actually did the deed was an interesting choice and that discovery could (should) have been a book of its own. The shunning seems to come from nowhere. If it was going to happen I'd much rather it happen after Rachel actually did something to cause it. Instead it happens after she she did nothing other than show up. From what I recall, no black magic was actually used at the scene by Rachel or anyone else, the accusation seems completely made up by the press. So I don't understand why Rachel acts as though she's made some kind of mistake that justifies the shunning. There have been plenty of things she's done in the past that might have justified it, at least from an outside point of view, so I really am not sure why Harrison decided to have her shunned for something she didn't really do and why she has Rachel accept it. The shunning is clearly a response to the accumulation of things that Rachel had done in the past, but it's just as clear that the events at the mall were the straw that broke the camel's back. I just wish that straw was real.The revolving door that is Rachel's love life is starting to get really, really old. The whole thing with Marhsall just seemed unnecessary and her deciding that he was right to leave because she "failed to have everything under control when she promised she did" was really lame because again, she got shunned for basically showing up. I'm not sure how that gets to be her fault. The thing with Ivy is annoying because I thought it was pretty clear they'd decided they were close friends who loved each other but not in a romantic way and while that wasn't the resolution I'd hoped for, I thought it was reasonable and I was glad it was resolved. Now it's sort of back up in the air again. There was an idea floated to try and make the virus dormant, at least while Ivy is living, basically making her human (or witch?) but I think doing so would radically change who Ivy is. They can't be together and still be who they are unless they can get rid of the dominance part of it.The thing with Pierce might be the most annoying thing of all. I'm not sure if I'd be less annoyed if I hadn't already read the short story where he's introduced or not. I might buy the whole he's the man she's measured everyone else against deal if he'd ever been mentioned before in the main series. I can't imagine how confusing it would be if I hadn't read the story he's in. I guess the thought is that if he's already dead she can't get him killed? He doesn't do much for me and the nineteenth century speech is going to get old.
  • (5/5)
    Great series! Rachel is snarky and a kick a$$ chick! Jinx is hysterical and Ivy is a real bada$$! I may be crushing on Al, I know he is a demon but he is just so funny!

    Terrific concept and truly entertaining tale!
  • (4/5)
    I love the whole hollows series. Rachel, Ivy and Jenks pull it off time and time again. Magic, mystery and danger follow them where ever they go.This was one of my least favorite of the books. i just couldn't get in to the story of the banshee and with the flash backs a Rachel tries to remember the death of a friend. It just lacked the energy that the other novels have.
  • (3/5)
    Steadily improving. Some lingering storylines are wrapped up nicely. There are one or two still to be resolved, and I actually got teary at one point (poor Jencks!), but this time I'm actually eagerly anticipating the next installment rather than planning on reading it mostly because I've read the rest of the series.
  • (3/5)
    every long-running series has a filler book now and then, and this is one of them. our heroine has a lot of loose ends to tie up (what happened to Kisten? how is she going to deal with this whole demon-student bit?), and this 7th installment in a very good series spends more time tying than creating new threads. newcomers shouldn't start here, you definitely won't get what the well-deserved positive buzz is about.
  • (3/5)
    Another messy, rambling adventure, but the momentum is holding, more or less. There's some good stuff - Rynn Cormel is a great vampire lead, much better than the unnuanced, kind of disgusting Piscary, and Ford the empathic therapist is a fun minor character. There's a lot of neutral-to-blah stuff - yet another magical species whom Rachel's adventures have inadvertently altered, Tom the least interesting reoccuring villain ever, Pierce the utterly implausible, and the anticlimactic and poorly-foreshadowed resolution to the interminably mystery of who killed Kisten. This would be a much better book in a much better series if Harrison wrote more outlines.
  • (3/5)
    I am a bit tired of the concept here and kind of wish that Harrison would move on. However, I was fascinated with Kisten's character and was glad to see that Harrison resolves the issue in this novel. I miss him! I wish that she hadn't killed him off!
  • (4/5)
    Little frustrating for the first part of the book - Rachel is a big girl and yet still feels guilty for her decisions. She needs to pull up her big-girl panties and live her own life, whatever that might entail. She tiptoes around people in her life rather than just tell them to get over it.A lot of the angst feels forced. Particularly around Trent - she saved his life and his knickers are in a knot over it. I'd have left him with Al, but anyway. I had high hopes when I read that Kisten's death was resolved in this book, but found that resolution a bit on the lame side. And I have no idea why Rachel took on another curse in order to "seal" the truth of his death - not sure how what she did sealed it, or why she'd do a black curse to do it, etc.But anyway, none of this means that I didn't like the book - I did like it, quite a bit... I just wish that Rachel would act her age and live her life.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not so sure about the direction this series is going these days, but I am still enjoying it for the most part. I'm looking forward to what's coming next just to see what kind of mess a now shunned Rachel can get into this time.
  • (4/5)
    Another terrific Hollows installment. It's so easy to immerse yourself in Rachael's life even if it's been a while since the last. Its such a character driven series and I am always eager to catch up with them.I do feel this lacked some lighter moments though in comparison with others. Understandable with Kisten's death still unresolved, Matalina ailing etc but still the humor in the series, even in the face of the big bads, is one of the things that keep it fresh for me. Not a lot of relief in this one, especially for Rachel. That being said there is always plenty going on and once I start it's really hard to put back down again (Note to self: Dont start it at 11.30 pm because finally finishing at 4am is not conducive to being woken up at 7 am by small boys fighting over which Hot Wheels car is fastest)
  • (5/5)
    Things for Kim Harrission keep betting better and better, and that includes this series. In book 7 of the Hallows, Rachel find herself in one of her worst nightmares, she is shunned for being a black witch. But she find who her real friends are, and settles some scores along the way. Having become Al's student, she suddenly finds herself reaplced when Al snatches a ghost friend of hers that she raised years agfo when she was 18. Her mother decides to move out west, and we get to know Rache's brother Robbie.Her big case this time around - it looks like a banshee is out killing people all over Cincinnati, and the banshee has a baby who is even stonger than its mother. With the FIS and IS breathing down Rachel's neck, her trying to prove who and what she is, her situation even with Ivy becomes more intense, until the two find out who killed Kisten.
  • (5/5)
    Just when I thought I had healed from the lose of Kist we finally find out what actually happened. This pulled on my heart strings.Rachel is as always a kick ass lead charecter. You get to see a new side to her in this story. She is one of those people that resonate in you.
  • (5/5)
    Another mystery-oriented entry in the series, as opposed to one that focuses on Rachael specifically. Though there is still quite a bit on Rachael here. For instance, we get to find out what really happened to Kisten and Rachael, something that I was a little concerned when it was set aside in the last entry in the series. This happens at the end of the novel, though. The standalone mystery this time is about a banshee who is stealing people's auras to feed her newborn. Rachael and company have to track her down, and banshees put up quite a fight. Especially when they steal your aura and make it difficult to even move around for days.I loved the introduction to the banshee here. I thought that we had seen all the supernatural beings in the series already, and I was quite pleased with how sinister and dangerous the banshees were. And it's even a decent love story, so two for two. Rachael once again puts her life on the line again and again, but that's par for the course in these books. It doesn't make it any less exciting though, especially since she's so easy to like.I couldn't read this fast enough. This is one of my favorite novel series of all time, and I just can't put them down after I start. Everything moves fast, and you always have to find out what happens next.
  • (3/5)
    This one made me tear up more than once. We finally learn how and why Kisten was killed. Rachel gets herself into more trouble while fighting a banshee and the banshee’s weird family. We find out where Ivy’s wish from the first book went and we meet a ghost named Pierce who’s had a crush on Rachel since she was 18. I really like that nothing seems to go right for Rachel and I keep hoping that she’ll finally get a break. And I’m really sad that I have to wait a while to pick up the next one and find out how she gets out from under both Al and the coven that has it in for her.
  • (5/5)
    I first discovered the Rachel Morgan series back in June 2006, and I automatically fell in love with the world. Rachel is a witch and along with her two roommates vampire Ivy and pixie Jenks run their business Vampiric Charms. They bring in the bad guys when no one else can. If you enjoy reading about witches, vampires, werewolves, elves, and pixies, you should give this series a try.White Witch, Black Curse is book number 7, and for me it didn't disappoint. This series is always action packed with conflict, adventure and sometimes even romance. This time Rachel is in search of the person who killed her lover Kisten.I know you probably hear this a lot from me but, this is one of my favorite series (I have alot I know, there's just too many to have just one). Rachel is one of my favorite heroines. She's a witch, not perfect by any means. And most days her life is a mess. She doesn't always go about handling her problems the best way. I think that's one of the reason's I like her. Whenever a new book comes out I can't wait to see what she's gotten herself into.
  • (5/5)
    Two Minute Review for "White Witch, Black Curse" by Kim HarrisonRachel Morgan is back battling a banshee. Ivy, Jenks and her merry band of friends, lovers and sometimes even her enemies will all try to save her ass. Her loyalty to the people around ber is so passionate and pure. Rachel will find out who killed Kristen no matter how much pain it causes her. I really enjoy these characters, the wonderful plot twists and the bad guys are really bad!
  • (3/5)
    Perhaps it's a sign that the Hollows series is starting to wear thin with me. I didn't elect to read this book until I found the hard cover edition remaindered last week.Harrison seems to write with equal parts inspired bravado and foolish distraction. The light police-procedural parts of the plot stand their own with other well-written Urban Fantasy do-gooders like Harry Dresden. On the other hand, we find utterly silly ideas like the embarrassing fully-clothed witch-sex scene in the belfry, or tiring content like the continued will-she-or-won't-she interplay between Rachel and Ivy.While I hesitate to make the connection, I'm starting to suspect that the accumulation of plot and characters may be edging the series closer to Jordan-esque, glacial storytelling. With every book, Harrison has lobbed a few more characters, plots, and ideas (Rachel's brother, shunning, and banshees, oh my!) into the air while juggling everything else from prior volumes. I found myself occasionally lost with mentions or appearances of characters I didn't remember from prior volumes (or worse yet, from short stories I haven't bothered to read). Very little is resolved, aside from the non-event discovery of Kisten's killer who hadn't been portrayed in earlier volumes. Oh yeah, and Denon died. Don't remember who Denon is? Neither did I, but Harrison will fill you in on the details.Because the book is written in first-person, the reader is chained to the narrative character's perception. Rachel continues to be a frustrating filter on this world, as she has little real insight into the people she interacts with. Her relationship space seems to be defined by how dangerous or powerful others are, what they're wearing, and whatever they need Rachel to do at that particular moment. The only character who really pushes through the filter is Jenks. Unfortunately, this volume had the worse treatment of Jenks to date, as we enjoy second-hand suffering as Matelina (Jenks's wife) has almost no contact with Rachel. I'm beginning to wonder if Rachel's perception is a product of character development or a consequence of Harrison's writing style.All of this not withstanding, if you have stayed with the series this long, you might as well keep reading. It isn't a bad entertainment, despite the flaws. It didn't have a single throw-the-book-across-the-room moment of utter stupidity.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, Rachel Morgan series, how I love thee. Let me count the ways: 1. You are full of rich, conflicted, and complicated characters. Your good guys are just a little bad, and your bad guys are just a little good, which makes everyone a lovely shade of grey. A reader can find themselves wondering if a demon or ruthless business man are really all *that* bad. 2. You are full of rich, conflicted, and complicated relationships. In real life, there are layers to relationships, and Harrison knows how to show it in her novels. Rachel and Ivy are more than partners. They’re best friends, and feel a deep loyalty to each other, often without thinking of the consequences to themselves (or thinking of them, and deciding they don’t matter). Jenks has grown into much more than the spunky pixie side-kick. He is a father figure packed into four inches of determination and love. Even Rachel’s relationship with the demon Al has many levels, from resentment to respect. 3. You take place in an incredibly different yet familiar world. Harrison has managed to build an alternate universe of sorts, one which might have been the same as our real world if not for some diseased tomatoes. 4. You seamlessly move the major series arc ahead while giving us an interesting immediate concern. 5. You don’t dilly dally with namby pamby background at the beginning of the story — you jump right in to the action! One thing that Harrison is especially gifted at is working the background information into the course of the story without it being overly intrusive. 6. You build upon current supernatural mythologies without changing too much and without adding cheesy elements. In Harrison’s books, the supernatural often feel more natural than the human. 7. You never ignore the past. Events that happened in the first books in the series still have an impact in the last books.This series is really one of the best paranormal series out there. If you’re not reading it, YOU SHOULD BE.
  • (4/5)
    Another enjoyable addition to the series. I was glad that there was a conclusion to the Kisten's murder storyline. Well worth the read.
  • (2/5)
    This is the 7th book in the Hollows series by Kim Harrison. In a series that has consistently blown me away with its great writing quality and fast pace this book was a huge disappointment. I really feel like Kim Harrison was forced to write this book and forced to wrap up the whole Kisten mystery and didn't want to; this book just drags. Quick side note: I listened to this on audio book and the audio book quality was great.In this book Rachel is trying to remember what happened on the night when Kisten was murdered. Ford is along to try and help her jog her memories. Ivy is still trying to solve the Kisten murder in her own way. Then they get called on a case that ends up involving a mother Banshee who may be killing to feed her child. Oh and Pierce (you know the guy in the short story done in the anthology "Holidays from Hell") pops into Rachel's life. Also like usual Rachel is having trouble with Al (her demon teacher) and is trying to keep things with Marshall on a "strictly friends" basis.As you can tell from the above things were kind of jumbled together; Rachel didn't seem to know what she was doing most of the book. There are so many things that bothered me about this book. First and foremost is Rachel's whining. I mean you probably could have cut 50 pages out if you had eliminated some of the whining; I felt like counting the number of times Rachel said "But, I'm a White witch!" with an honest to god foot-stomping whine...the number of times this was said had to be in the double digits at least; were they trying to drive home the book title? Rachel acted pathetic throughout the book and constantly said she would change things while she constantly made the same horrible decisions over and over again. It just wasn't interesting to read about that.Next issue is the Kisten thing. All this build up over multiple books over who Kisten's killer was...it was very anti-climatic. The conclusion to the Kisten murder was weird too (I won't give anything away) but it was very rushed and very unsatisfying and really felt forced; like someone told Harrison she had to wrap up this plot point so she grudgingly did it. My only positive reaction to this part of the story is that we finally can (hopefully) stop hearing "Who was Kisten's killer?".Then there is the appearance of Pierce, a minor character in a short story in an anthology half of the readers of this series probably haven't read. Pierce takes a major part in this story and I thought it was odd that he suddenly plays such a big role in Rachel's life. His inclusion felt forced and unnatural. The Banshee character Mia was also unsatisfying; there was so much "we have her, we lost her, we have her, we lost her" that I just got bored with the whole story. Rachel's whole moral struggle with bringing in Mia was odd, it was like Rachel completely lost her sense of right and wrong and wandered around confused for most of the Mia investigations.Of course, to bring even more pain into the mix Harrison had to (again) bring up Ivy and Rachel's blood balance. I had really, really hoped we were done hearing about this. In fact it seemed pretty tied up in the last book and I was disappointed to see it rear its ugly head again. Bringing this up, yet again, added to my boredom and made me roll my eyes...I mean come on let the characters move on and get on with the story. Same with Marshall, what was up with his relationship with Rachel, is it there just to take up page space?There were a couple good pieces to the story. Pierce is actually an interesting character and I am eager to see more of him. Eddings and Glenn were great characters and added more to the story than any of the other characters. Al stole the scenes he was in too. Also Bis was awesome and I hope the gargoyle is in the story more in the future. Rynn Cormel is an intriguing master vamp and I am also eager to find out what his future actions are. In fact all of these characters were way more interesting than Rachel and Ivy; maybe Rachel's character is just getting tired. All I know is something has to change or I will be getting rid of all the books in this series and dropping it.All in all a disappointment. This was a long, long book that felt forced and chased itself in circles a lot. There were a couple bright spots, but overall I just wanted the book to be over.
  • (3/5)
    I was suprised by the many negative reviews of "White Witch, Black Curse". I agree with many of the points made in these reviews, however I believe the good in this story far outweigh the negative points. My biggest problem with this story is actually probably my own fault, so I won't weigh that in my star giving...Its about a year between Hollows books and I found myself very confused by a lot of things in the book. I didn't remember Kisten's death well enough to really relate to the story of them trying to 'remember' the killer by walking through Kisten's boat. I couldn't remember Jenk's reasoning for giving Rachel the foretting potion. Didn't all this happen in book#5? Again my own fault, but it did leave me feeling a little out of sorts during the story. Also there is obviously still chemistry and feelings between Ivy and Rachel. I don't necessarily want them together as a romantic couple, but I think its hard to deny what Harrison is creating. And I was confused by this as well because I thought the issue was resolved in a previous installment. I too missed Trent and Ceri...and Al was such fun for each page he was on that I truly want to see more of him as well. I wasn't upset by the introduction (again) of Pierce the ghost from Rachel's past. I was annoyed by the fact that he was just this briefly seen character in a novella, and then he is referred to in the book as the "man Rachel measures every man in her life by, and they dont' have a chance of measuring up" or something along those lines. The Jenks/Matalina lifespan is becoming more and more immenant. Somethign is going to have to happen one way or another after talking about it since book #4. I can't figure out how Jenks could die and not harm the series permanently. Maybe Harrison will suprise me on this one. The storyline was ok, but I wasn't excited by the whole banshee thing. I wish that the book could have had more of a focus on finding Kisten's killer and having the resolution be totally amazing. Instead I was underwhelmed by the killer and the after effects of Kisten's murder. Maybe the biggest problem was that there was too much going on and nothing felt all that important to the overall Hallows story arc. Probably the most important thing to happen was Rachel's shunning. This could cause all kinds of future entertaining events. Marshal's exit was also kind of odd. I hope that this story was Harrison's way of wrapping up some loose ends so we can cleanly focus on the everafter and Trent, Ceri and Al. The possibilities here are endless and amazing. Harrison's writing was still well done and I still really like Rachel, Ivy and Jenks. I am grateful for having this story to read so that I could visit with them again, but it just wasn't as strong as I've come to expect.
  • (5/5)
    Is she or isn't she? Rachel Morgan is sure she really isn't a black witch - pretty sure anyhow. She is still reeling from the death of Kisten, her lover when her mom decides to move to Sacramento, Al (her demonic teacher) decides to snatch anyone who is close to her and a new/old friend seems to be turning into something more.Rachel, Jenks and Ivy are involved in trying to catch a banshee. All in all not one of the nicer folks to try to corral, especially when she has a baby to feed - on people's emotions. Ivy is sworn off blood (again), Jenks' wife is nearly 20 - death age for a pixie - and they have over 50 children.Rachel is trying to persevere in her usual way and I do believe this is the bestnovel Kim Harrison has done to date. Fans of the series will not be disappointed when they get to the end. In fact, you'll be wanting March to come soon as that is when the next installment comes out!
  • (4/5)
    In general, I love the Rachel Morgan series because Rachel is fearless, fun and feisty. This book was kind of lame and Rachel was kind of lame. In fact, it was 500 pages of Rachel feeling sorry for herself. Talk about a Debbie Downer! Books are supposed to be an escape. If I wanted to be around people feeling sorry for themselves, I'd just go to work. There wasn't a lot of action, there wasn't a lot of character growth. This felt like a typical middle book in a trilogy - the one you don't really like, but need to make your way through to get to the end. With that all said, I still want to know how it ends, so I'll be waiting for book 8. (It doesn't need to get here anytime soon ... I'm a little racheled out.
  • (4/5)
    This series just keeps getting better. Characters from previous episodes re-appear, get a well-rounded treatment, and leave again. The author has slowed down the pace a little bit by savoring each scene - giving the reader a "you are there" sort of feeling. Minor details are noted -- sometimes they pay off, sometimes they are just detail. We see Jenks' anguish over his aging wife. We see Rachel as student to the demon Al. We even see a character first introduced in a story when Rachel was 18. We follow some of Ivy's angst. We see her brother and mother, and close the chapter on Kisten. In this chapter in the life of Rachel Morgan, she begins to understand some of the social consequences of accepting smut on her aura, even though the actions that got it there were motivated by a desire to rescue friends and not-exactly-friends. This is a very "slice of life" sort of book. Yes, there is a banshee to be captured, Kisten's murderer to be found, a friend-not-a-boyfriend to get to know better, a ghost to talk to, and always the next run. Quite enjoyable. She is getting to be a very powerful witch, but still concerned that she manages to get the people around her hurt as people try to get to her. A solid entry in the series.
  • (3/5)
    I've been reading the series since the beginning & this is book 7. It got an extra star because it is still so engaging. It's entertaining fluff & fun. Our heroine, a witch, is still trying to do right & still coming up with nothing but problems. She no sooner gets one thing settled than two others pop up. Which problems get solved & which new ones will pop up is the mystery. After 6 other books, I knew there wouldn't be a clean, happy ending. Hopefully, she'll end the series on a good note one day, but until then, there is plenty of fodder for new books.She's had the opportunity to go the Hamilton route & bring lots of graphic sex into the story, but hasn't. I appreciate that.Here's the books in the Rachel Morgan series:1. Dead Witch Walking (2004)2. The Good, the Bad, and the Undead (2005)3. Every Which Way But Dead (2005)4. A Fistful of Charms (2006)5. For a Few Demons More (2007)6. The Outlaw Demon Wails (2008) aka Where Demons Dare7. White Witch, Black Curse (2009)