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Desperation

Desperation

Written by Stephen King

Narrated by Stephen King


Desperation

Written by Stephen King

Narrated by Stephen King

ratings:
3.5/5 (2,523 ratings)
Length:
21 hours
Released:
Feb 2, 2016
ISBN:
9781508218289
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

"The terror is relentless" (Publishers Weekly) in Stephen King's #1 national bestseller about a little mining town, Desperation, that many will enter on their way to somewhere else. But getting out is not easy as it would seem…

Located off a desolate stretch of Interstate 50, Desperation, Nevada, has few connections with the rest of the world. It is a place, though, where the seams between worlds are thin. And it is a place where several travelers are abducted by Collie Entragian, the maniacal police officer of Desperation. Entragian uses various ploys for the abductions, from an arrest for drug possession to "rescuing" a family from a nonexistent gunman. There's something very wrong here, all right, and Entragian is only the surface of it.

The secrets embedded in Desperation's landscape, and the evil that infects the town like some viral hot zone, are both awesome and terrifying. But as one of the travelers, young David Carver, seems to know-though it scares him nearly to death to realize it-so are the forces summoned to combat them. "Stephen King's knack for turning the stray junk of pop culture into sick, darkly engrossing thrills has rarely been this much in evidence as in Desperation" (Salon).
Released:
Feb 2, 2016
ISBN:
9781508218289
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Fairy Tale, Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.



Reviews

What people think about Desperation

3.3
2523 ratings / 69 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Mr. King prides himself on not being a writer who plots his books. He counts some of the books he has approached with an outline or predetermined structure as among his least favorite projects (Insomnia is an example - which I take exception with, because I really like Insomnia).Desperation is ultimately what I think is a good example of how that free-flowing, go-where-it-takes-you style can flop. A good opening - cartoonish, but intentionally so - fast pace, some promise of brutality, very foreign to his typical New England digs. In opening chapters, the hills literally and figuratively have eyes (throughout, as well - but the direct references dwindled as the book moved on) - something I think set the stage for a drama comparable to The Hills Have Eyes. Senseless, ugly, "What are you going to do about it?" brutality that strikes at fragile family members and lovers alike.It moved on to become a story about whether God is love, or cruelty. The Christian God, of course - this is mainstream pop-culture American writing, don't you know? When you say God in the US, you best not mean any of the hundreds of gods it is okay to be atheistic towards, and instead be referring to John 3:16 fanatical sign-waving-in-a-stadium God. An SK book is no place to pay lip service to diversity, at the end of the day. Mostly white, nearly always straight folks - the ones who don't shy away from shopping their local Rite Aid for books to read on the beach.I didn't hate it. I've come out the other end of some of SK's books hating them for their poor endings and untied loose ends - this ties up fairly neatly. I don't think SK liked it all that much, about 4/5ths of the way through he gives this description of a writer who feels too old to care about what he's offering his publishers:"He was getting on, and if he wanted to take himself a little less seriously, surely he had that right. There was no need to shoulder each book like a backpack filled with rocks and then sprint uphill with it. That might be okay for the kids, the bootcamp recruits, but those days were behind him now. And it was sort of a relief that they were."I can't read that and not think of it as other than self-referential. I'm grateful that he changed his tune after his brush with death in '99, though - some really mature writing has come since this book - seemingly from the mind of a man who realized that he couldn't really retire if he wanted too. He needs to do this - and if you are going to do it, you should give a better effort than what Desperation is made of.Little cursed statues, demons in rotting dead flesh, supernatural communication, faux religious significance, stormy backdrop (the crux of other books he's written before and after - Duma Key, Pet Semetary, The Shining, The Stand, on and on). Most of his staples are here. Gunslingers are here (with more than one DT reference). It is a decent read for people who already like SK a lot. Not a great example of his work, though, at the end of the day.A saving grace could be its relationship to The Regulators, a 'mirror-book' released by his long-known/embraced pseudonym and released simultaneously. I haven't read it yet, though - so I can't comment on whether it gives more pleasure to the reader to have both books under their belt.
  • (5/5)
    Travelers are waylaid to the mining town of Desperation, Nevada, where they are imprisoned and slaughtered by a monstrous entity wearing the skin of a traffic cop.This is a parallel novel to The Regulators, published under King's pseudonym of Richard Bachman, in that it has the same characters and premise but the story unfolds very differently. I liked The Regulators more because it was different from King's usual fare, but this is a terrific read as well. In the venerable Stephen King tradition, a small group of ordinary people must work together to battle an extraordinary evil and make a stand for the white.Read upon release (1996) because King is one of my favorite authors.
  • (4/5)
    Desperation by Stephen KingThe Carver family, Ralph, Ellen, David and Kristen, are on a fun filled vacation trip. They are enjoying the trip until they have a blow-out of one of the tires on the R.V. Their lives are suddenly turned up-side down when they meet up with a police officer who takes them into the town of Desperation.Peter and Mary are on their way home to New York when they are stopped by a police officer. Things go from bad to worse when the police officer finds a bag of pot in the trunk of their car. They take a ride with the officer into the town of Desperation.Several others have the misfortune of meeting the cop from hell. They soon figure out that this is not a simply case of a cop gone bad. They have little time to figure out what is going on and get out of the town of Desperation.The book holds my attention through most of the book but falters some close to the end. I don't think this is one of Mr. Kings better novels but I still enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    I couldn't put it down. Lost lots of sleep reading this deep into the night. Another excellent story by Mr. King!
  • (2/5)
    I tried to like this book. I really did. But it wasn't to be. Originally, I said to a friend that this book was a short story that was tortured into a novel. Later I just said that this was a torturous novel. Yes, there is some interesting theology, but man, it comes at the expense of a good story being depicted. I've already got a source for interesting theology. I turn to King for a story. On this occasion, he left me hanging.
  • (4/5)
    This dry story is part of a Lovecraftian universe SK works with throiugh several pieces. Tak! Desperation is a town in Arizona or one of those sunny states where the cow bones bleach in the sun and we KNOW there's something wrong from the first time our normees are stopped by this big ole po-leesh-man.