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The Regulators

The Regulators

Written by Stephen King

Narrated by Frank Muller


The Regulators

Written by Stephen King

Narrated by Frank Muller

ratings:
4/5 (317 ratings)
Length:
12 hours
Released:
Feb 2, 2016
ISBN:
9781508218319
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

The battle against evil has begun in this "devishly entertaining" (Publishers Weekly) story of a suburban neighborhood in the grip of surreal terror-a #1 national bestseller from Stephen King writing as Richard Bachman.

Peaceful suburbia on Poplar Street in Wentworth, Ohio, takes a turn for the ugly when four vans containing armed "regulators" terrorize the street's residents, cold-bloodedly killing anyone foolish enough to step outside their homes. Houses mysteriously transform into log cabins and the street now ends in what looks like a child's hand-drawn western landscape. Masterminding this sudden onslaught is the evil creature, Tak, who has taken over the body of an autistic eight-year-old boy, Seth Garin.

"A rip-roaringly violent thriller whose main action takes place in little more than an hour and a half" (Booklist), The Regulators features an introduction by Stephen King on "The Importance of Being Bachman."
Released:
Feb 2, 2016
ISBN:
9781508218319
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Fairy Tale, Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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What people think about The Regulators

4.2
317 ratings / 24 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    This book was horrible and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. Bad story and boring
  • (3/5)
    Very nice ending to an erratic story that's really all over the place
  • (1/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    NO good .really badly done. Reader was good at least

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    Even though it approached a really interesting concept, I liked Desperation more out of the two.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Solid ending in my opinion ???????? on to the next

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Terrific listen. Highly recommend. Totally unexpected twists and turns. I've always been a Stephen King fan and this one certainly didn't disappoint.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)
    "None of this was real, after all. It was just a refuge in her mind."Poplar Street in Wentworth, a small town in Ohio where the residents live typically suburban lives minding their own business and quietly trying to live their lives. A storm is brewing but otherwise it is a normal day, a paper-boy is delivering a local free newspaper, two young children go to the local store to buy chocolate, older ones play with a Frisbee and adults cut the lawn or prepare their barbecues ready for use in the evening all oblivious to the fact that a chrome red van is idling up the hill. Soon the residents are caught up in madness as the Regulators arrive in force.Initially this all appears to be an interesting premise for a novel but very quickly it becomes obvious that being some gripping psychological drama is becomes a rather run of the mill piece of writing. Put simply a young autistic boy, who spends far too much time sat in front of a television screen watching old westerns and kids action cartoons, gets possessed by evil entity. This entity,called 'Tak', then brings mayhem to this peaceful suburban street by manifesting the characters which that it idolises on the small screen in to life where they kill residents and destroy their homes. Some people will die, some will live and lots of houses get destroyed. That just about sums it up. I found myself not caring whether any of the characters lived or died. In fact I soon realised that none of the residents, with exception of the young boy Seth and his aunt Audrey, added anything to the tale. Nor did I find myself sat on the edge of my seat with baited breath waiting to see what will happen next. Despite their being plenty of blood and gore you get to the end of the book and realise that the whole climax is based putting a laxative in an eight year old's drink. I mean 'really'.I can see why this was published under Stephen King's alter ego, Richard Bachman, rather than his own name.
  • (5/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    This is one of my favorite King books, it's such an amazing setting and cast of characters.

    2 people found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    Bachman’s been referred to as King without a conscience. The Regulators certainly fits this description. Released concurrently with King’s Desperation, Regulators deals with the same cast of characters in an alternate reality. The entire book is essentially one big blood-bath.The fast-paced excitement is also the problem with this book. With only one chapter of character development to set up the story, you’re taken on a thrill-ride with one-dimensional people you just can’t seem to care about.The story’s redeeming value for me was the tie-in with the Dark Tower myth. The villain, Tak, is clearly a creature from the space between worlds (although it’s not made clear in the text). The alternate version in King’s Desperation supports the Dark Tower’s multiple universes idea.The book’s exciting, but the day after I finished it, I’m already forgetting the characters. Hopefully Desperation will prove to be a little more substantial.
  • (1/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The audio is choppy you can’t even listen to it

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    Characters are weak, which is disappointing for King (aside from the autistic villain, who surely rivals the manic cop in Desperation, and is definitely more creepy). Highlights also include a sympathetic and violent suicide scene, and generally the plot has a nice rhythm aside from a few slow sections.I liked Desperation better as a whole, but there are much better scenes to be had in The Regulators. Not sure which is scarier, though I think the freakish innocent, here, is actually much worse than any of the threatened violence in Desperation. Both novels are spooky mainly because of their suggestions of sexual nastiness, and I think it's worse when that nastiness comes from an disabled child. The boy's encounter with Tak in the old mine stands out, too, as something made particularly spooky because of its Spielberg-like sweetness and mystery.
  • (4/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    This is a companion book of sorts to Desperation. While both books feature the same characters and similar themes and plot points, they diverge wildly. This is the better of the two books, much more chilling and, in many ways, believable than Desperation. The whole idea of the normal suburban street that is attacked brutally and without warning, and then slowly isolated, really terrified me, so much that this book kept me up nights.

    2 people found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    I read "Desperation" a few weeks ago. Reading reviews of that book, I discovered its connection to "The Regulators." I thought the plot would be pretty much the same, so I thought it would be interesting to read another book at the same time. The other book I found is called "Conquest," written by two authors, John Connolly and Jennifer RidyardThe Regulators' and Desperation's plots were different. In Desperation, I had a hard time giving a voice to the bad guy. The "YEE HAW" and "GOSH DARN" phrases disrupted the story. In the Regulators, I was OK with it. The possessed character, and the back story explained it much better.

    2 people found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I don't even know how to explain this book....it was soooo strange! That being said, I couldn't put it down! I had to know what happened. It reminded me a little bit of From A Buick 8 because of the alternate world type of thing. It was definitely different but a really good read.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The master of horror, Stephen King, chalked up another page turner under the pseudonym of "the late" Richard Bachman, "The Regulators.". In "The Regulators" the characters are already assembled as neighbors on Poplar Street. Their glorious summer day is shattered by the arrival of a crayon red van and its armed driver. Collie Entragian, a former cop drummed off the force on trumped-up charges, attempts to protect his neighbors and preserve the crime scene but the violence quickly escalates out of control. As the street begins a nightmarish metamorphosis into something out of the worst of children's television and old westerns, the strengths and weaknesses of the inhabitants begin to work on all of them - Johnny Marinville, the successful author of children's books, haunted by a dissipated past and a too-vivid vision; Cynthia, the new clerk at the convenience store, whose two-toned hair and irreverent wit obscure a core of decency; Tom Billingsley, the retired veterinarian; Steve Ames, a young man drifting through life, picking up skills.
    Then there's Audrey Wyler, the young widow with the autistic nephew, Seth. No one's seen her in a while and at first they scarcely notice her continuing absence amidst all the mayhem. But Audrey's particular hell has been a long time coming. There's a thing in Seth (he calls it "Tak") that can bend people to its will and the world to its malevolent vision and it's growing stronger.

    While there is violence and blood, it is driven by the story and I have read alot worse. The biggest complaint I would make is that like 90% of King's books its a bit too long.





    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    If read in conjunction with Desperation, bump it to 4 stars.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Yet another good book from this author. Very interesting story, full of unexpected twists. I also really enjoyed the way that the format alternated from standard storytelling to excerpts from personal journals, newspapers, and other sources. It seemed to make the story much bigger and far-reaching than the one street on which it takes place.One warning: this story is filled to the brim with violence and very graphic blood and gore. Flying blood and guts and gleaming skulls are described with no restraint. If this isn't your thing, you might want to avoid this book, because you'll be encountering violence every few pages once the action gets going.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Not one of his better books, but I'd probably read it again in a pinch. It was interesting, and I do love the way he ties bits from other books into his stories. This one refers to parts of "Desperation", which I actually probably wouldn't read again. This one was better than that, at least.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    1996 - The Regulators by Richard Bachman
    1996 - Desperation by Stephen King

    These 2 were meant to be companion books by King using as they did the same character names, in a similar sort of peril from the same monster. A lot of reviewers said it was lazy writing at the time but I personally loved it. It added rather to my enjoyment of both rather than detracting.

    Good Times.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Pretty dang good! A boy is delivering the newspapers on his street then - BLAM! The story roars along right from that start! And it was super cool to read a story that is so intertwined with another book (Desperation), yet so different! Fun too! But, I'd say this - what if the little boy had not been allowed to watch television shows with violent images? For me, it reaffirms my parenting choices for my 6 1/2 year old!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Companion to Desperation by Stephen King, this story has more action and doesn't explain as much. It's probably better to read Desperation first to help understand this book better.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Desperation was the better half of the coin, or story, so to speak.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    One of the Bachman books originally, this story is tied in with Desperation as King later. Tak!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)
    Not as good as Desperation.