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The Bone Labyrinth: A Sigma Force Novel

The Bone Labyrinth: A Sigma Force Novel

Written by James Rollins

Narrated by Christian Baskous


The Bone Labyrinth: A Sigma Force Novel

Written by James Rollins

Narrated by Christian Baskous

ratings:
4.5/5 (35 ratings)
Length:
15 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 15, 2015
ISBN:
9780062395580
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

A war is coming, a battle that will stretch from the prehistoric forests of the ancient past to the cutting-edge research labs of today, all to reveal a true mystery buried deep within our DNA, a mystery that will leave readers changed forever . . .

In this groundbreaking masterpiece of ingenuity and intrigue that spans 50,000 years in human history, New York Times bestselling author James Rollins takes us to mankind’s next great leap.

But will it mark a new chapter in our development . . . or our extinction?

In the remote mountains of Croatia, an archaeologist makes a strange discovery:  a subterranean Catholic chapel, hidden for centuries, holds the bones of a Neanderthal woman. In the same cavern system, elaborate primitive paintings tell the story of an immense battle between tribes of Neanderthals and monstrous shadowy figures. Who is this mysterious enemy depicted in these ancient drawings and what do the paintings mean?

Before any answers could be made, the investigative team is attacked, while at the same time, a bloody assault is made upon a primate research center outside of Atlanta. How are these events connected? Who is behind these attacks?  The search for the truth will take Commander Gray Pierce of Sigma Force 50,000 years into the past. As he and Sigma trace the evolution of human intelligence to its true source, they will be plunged into a cataclysmic battle for the future of humanity that stretches across the globe . . . and beyond.

With the fate of our future at stake, Sigma embarks on its most harrowing odyssey ever—a breathtaking quest that will take them from ancient tunnels in Ecuador that span the breadth of South America to a millennia-old necropolis holding the bones of our ancestors. Along the way, revelations involving the lost continent of Atlantis will reveal true mysteries tied to mankind’s first steps on the moon. In the end, Gray Pierce and his team will face to their greatest threat: an ancient evil, resurrected by modern genetic science, strong enough to bring about the end of man’s dominance on this planet.

Only this time, Sigma will falter—and the world we know will change forever.

Publisher:
Released:
Dec 15, 2015
ISBN:
9780062395580
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

James Rollins is the author of international thrillers that have been translated into more than forty languages. His Sigma series has been lauded as one of the “top crowd pleasers” (New York Times) and one of the "hottest summer reads" (People magazine). In each novel, acclaimed for its originality, Rollins unveils unseen worlds, scientific breakthroughs, and historical secrets—and he does it all at breakneck speed and with stunning insight. He lives in the Sierra Nevada mountains.


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What people think about The Bone Labyrinth

4.3
35 ratings / 17 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Rollins splits Sigma's field agents into two task groups in this one. Both groups are dealing with Chinese scientists, soldiers and geeks who are all behaving badly. One group travels from Croatia to Italy to Ecuador while the other goes from Atlanta to Beijing to the DRC, meaning that fans of diverse settings will have a lot to enjoy here. There's plenty of interesting science and speculation behind the various plots in this one, as well, and Rollins does a decent job with the info dumps here, usually presenting them in the form of dialogue. As a result, the pacing is decent. It was also nice to see some of the worst of the bad guys meet with creative and nightmarish fates. And that ending -- the parting of ways for some of the story's good guys in Africa. Top-notch stuff that raises a lot of questions about the fate of one Sigma team member while providing a great curtain call for a couple of the furrier characters in this one. The room may have even gotten a little dusty as I was reading that part. Maybe. Just a little.
  • (3/5)
    A bit of a mishmash of ideas, theories, etc., but some good action scenes. A fun quick read, but I was left a bit disappointed in the finale.
  • (4/5)
    After reading several books in a row in which the author had no idea how to grab and hold the reader's attention, it was a pleasure to read this book from an author who knows how to write thrillers. Mostly I've read his non-Sigma Force books, but it wasn't a problem that I was unfamiliar with the team, and I'm not very picky about character development in thrillers. This book has genetics, anthropology, lost cities, ancient remains, giants, head hunters and strangely intelligent primates. It also has some really relentless villains and jumps around from Croatia to the United States, Italy, Equador and China. The story is told in alternating chapters involving two sets of protagonists. The first group is comprised of one of a pair of twin, American scientists studying the evolution of human intelligence, a Catholic priest and some Sigma Force members assigned to rescue them after things go bad in a cave in Croatia. The other group, who wind up in a vast, underground science facility, is comprised of the second twin scientist, some more Sigma Force members and Baako, the young gorilla who is the subject of the twins' research. The whole book was thrilling, but I was more drawn to the Baako story. I really needed to know what happened to him. The protagonists in the alternate chapters were on more of an historical quest, and while it was exciting and interesting it wasn't clear to me how it was ever going to be very helpful for the other group. I really enjoyed this book, but I sometimes felt those "quest" chapters were a frustrating interruption. Surprisingly for a thriller, the last chapter actually made me cry, but in a good way. It was also interesting to read in the author's notes at the end of the book how much of the story was based on facts.I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.
  • (5/5)
    One of Rollins' best Sigmas so far!
  • (4/5)
    BONE LABYRINTH, A Sigma Force Novel by James RollinsIf you have been following the exploits of the Sigma Force, this book is a tour de force. The team, that now includes former assassin, Seichan, races from peril to peril all while trying to prevent a disaster of epic proportions. In searching for the beginning of modern man, a scientist who works with Baako, an unusually intelligent gorilla, is kidnapped and forced to reveal a part of her work to identify why and how Neanderthals became modern man. Of course there is a demented quasi scientist in the Beijing Zoo who is trying to use the information to rule the world and controls an army of minions ready to die at his bidding.Exciting, and based loosely on real science, this continuation of the Sigma Force series will satisfy fans and introduce new readers to a new series. Hint: If you are new to the series, jot down the names of each character and a brief description as you meet them. Makes reading this series sooooo much easier, especially when characters (like Gray Pierce) are referred to by both names.4 of 5 stars
  • (5/5)
    James Rollins is my most favorite thriller/science fiction writer. I have to move him over to the SF side of thriller due to the what if aspects of his cutting edge science. This book has all the familiar elements of a good Rollins story: cutting edge science, good guys, dastardly villains, natural monsters, and strong women characters. This books' mystery concerns how human intelligence developed. It also took a little side trip into why the moon is the way it is. Personally, I've always thought our moon is so close and so big so that our monkey brain would want to go to it and see what it's all about and then go passed it because that is how we roll. I totally enjoyed seeing Kowalski do more than be the muscle of the group, and maybe even get a little romance of his own.
  • (2/5)
    I really wanted to like The Bone Labyrinth by James Rollins, however is was far too "out there" for my likes. Maybe if I had read his previous Sigma Force books I would have found this one more enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    James Rollins puts forth another solid entry in the Sigma Force series with "The Bone Labyrinth." In this 11th novel in the series, Sigma Force operatives become embroiled in the midst of a scientific war surrounding the history of mankind. Where did modern man come from, and how did we get here? I found the combination of science, anthropology, archaeology, and science fiction fascinating. Rollins manages to roll it all up, shake it up, and toss it back out as one very entertaining novel.As with every Sigma Force novel, the action is nearly non-stop, the plot very tightly woven with no superfluous scenes, and the character development just sufficient to make things interesting. This consistency in Rollins's writing is what keeps me coming back to the Sigma Force novels: I know that the books will always be good. So why did I give this book 4 stars instead of 5? Only because in a few small spots the anthropological/scientific explanations got a little tedious and interrupted the action flow of the book. Nonetheless, I'm very much looking forward to Sigma Force #12!
  • (3/5)
    The usual sigma force involved in another plot. This one had a nice twist with an ape that was way advanced.
  • (3/5)
    Very well written, as always by Rollins. My rating is based on my limited knowledge of, and limited interest in anthropology, astronomy and archaeology which are all involved in this complex story. I found the experiments with engineered genetics interesting if at times cruel. Heroes and villains battle throughout with lots of action. It's a must read if you are a Rollins fan.
  • (5/5)
    The Bone Labyrinth by James Rollins is a very highly recommended action/adventure thriller. This latest novel represents Rollins at his best; the plot is complex and the action non-stop, but I flew through the almost 500 pages at a breakneck pace trying to find out what happened next in all the various plot threads. In some ways I don't want to give away too much of the story, except to encourage fans and anyone who enjoys a great techno-thriller to pick this novel up for a great holiday novel.

    DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) and the Sigma force is back on the trail of a historical mystery that could give us answers to several questions about the evolution of human intelligence which geneticists and other scientists are seeking the answers to today. An archaeologist discovers in Croatia a subterranean cave that contains amazing paintings and treasures, but it also contains a Catholic chapel that holds the bones of a Neanderthal woman. Sigma members assist scientists as they try to uncover the mystery. Who were the people who created these works of art and why did a Catholic priest hide his discovery?

    The problem is that the Chinese military wants the discoveries/treasures for an entirely different reason: to continue with a series of unethical experiments they are conducting in genetic engineering. They also want a few scientists taken as hostages, but the Sigma force dead. Additionally they want a young gorilla, which is being raised and studied in the USA for the rate of growth of his of intelligence, captured and brought in for their cruel experiments. And that is just a small part of this globe-trotting thriller.

    The writing is impressive. Rollins keeps the various plots moving along quickly while proving information-packed storylines that are ripped-from-the-headlines fresh and topical. The key is the great job he does researching the ideas behind his plot. It all results in a great balance of action, science, and history. Rollins always includes a list of other books you can read if you want more information. He also makes it clear what is fact and fiction in his stories.

    I think The Bone Labyrinth could be enjoyed by anyone who likes a good thriller. Now I'm pretty sure I have read all the Sigma Force novels so I know the characters, but I don't think that any exhaustive background knowledge matters that much in this outing. Rollins gives you enough information on the characters for you to enjoy the novel. The real treat is the science/history/non-stop action he presents with his complex plots. I've said it before, and I'm going to repeat myself here, but I appreciate the fact that Rollins treats his readers with respect and a nod to their intelligence and ability to comprehend a complex plot.

    This is a stuck-over-night-at-the-airport book. Really. Get it if you are planning to fly anywhere for the holidays. It will keep you awake and entertained. Time will fly by even if you are delayed somewhere.

    Disclosure: My Kindle edition was courtesy of HarperCollins for review purposes.
  • (5/5)
    Another Consistently excellent book from Rollins - seamlessly blending fast paced fiction with cutting edge science and archaeology.
  • (5/5)
    What's left to say besides this is a culmination of James' best work to date? The Bone Labyrinth is chock full of archeological mystery entwined with razor-edge action. This TRULY is his best Sigma work to date AND fans won't want to miss the shocking revelation shrouded in mystery that is in store for the future of a prominent Sigma team member.
  • (4/5)
    Who cares if it’s formulaic when it delivers thrilling action and genuine pathos wrapped in a layer of speculative science and spiced with historical what-ifs.

    Worth the time.
  • (5/5)
    Very entertaining thriller. At times the plot felt a little uneven - I could here the edits the author put in probably after early feedback. Still it was very entertaining and I always looked forward to the next chapter. At a certain point it became clear, that many questions will not be answered in this book; yet the ending was satisfying.

    If you like Dan Brown, Indiana Jones and similar high-paced adventure thrillers, you will enjoy this book.
  • (5/5)
    A spectacular story.... Science, fantasy , history all given an intriguing narrative... Enjoyed it immensely ..
  • (4/5)
    The Bone Labyrinth is the 11th book in the Sigma Force series. These stories are all international thrillers where things have to be saved/fixed quickly before something bad happens. In this one several people are kidnapped and no one really knows why, but since they have connections to the US government, Sigma is sent to find them. There are twin sisters who are working on a government grant researching into the emergence of human intelligence. Their primary experiment is a young Gorilla that they genetically altered to try and affect the intelligence of the subject from birth. One of the sisters, was in Europe doing some research when she was called to a new cave discovered in Croatia. A unique skeleton was also discovered leading to a mystery, and why the sister Lena was there. While being shown the site, it was attacked by unknown assailants who raided the site and kidnapped some scientists. Maria, the other sister was left at home to watch Baako, was visited by Monk and Kowalski trying to piece together why someone would want to take her sister. More excitement ensues. Someone has some big plans for human genetic manipulation and they don’t care about human rights or borders, to get what they want. This is another wild ride with the sigma crew and world hoping to far off destinations. Overall it was a fun book, similar to the others I’ve read. Those who’ve enjoyed previous Sigma books will like this one as well. The reason I didn’t rate this one higher is because I had trouble with suspending some of my disbelief in the latter half of the book when they started implying all kinds of things about a super smart race of humans a long time ago. My understanding of history and evolution wouldn’t let me just go with the flow. But I still enjoyed the story and will likely try some more as I run across them.