Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Lily and the Octopus

Lily and the Octopus

Written by Steven Rowley

Narrated by Michael Urie


Lily and the Octopus

Written by Steven Rowley

Narrated by Michael Urie

ratings:
4/5 (115 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Jun 7, 2016
ISBN:
9781442399600
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Named to the American Library Association's Reference & User Services (RUSA) Listen List!

Combining the emotional depth of The Art of Racing in the Rain with the magical spirit of The Life of Pi, Lily and the Octopus is an epic adventure of the heart.

When you sit down with Lily and the Octopus, you will be taken on an unforgettable ride.

The magic of this novel is in the read, and we don't want to spoil it by giving away too many details.

We can tell you that this is a story about that special someone: the one you trust, the one you can't live without.

For Ted Flask, that someone special is his aging companion Lily, who happens to be a dog.

Lily and the Octopus reminds us how it feels to love fiercely, how difficult it can be to let go, and how the fight for those we love is the greatest fight of all.

Remember the last book you told someone they had to read?

Lily and the Octopus is the next one.
Released:
Jun 7, 2016
ISBN:
9781442399600
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Steven Rowley has worked as a freelance writer, newspaper columnist, and screenwriter. Originally from Portland, Maine, he is a graduate of Emerson College. He currently resides in Los Angeles with his boyfriend and their dog. He is the author of Lily and the Octopus, The Editor, and The Guncle. Follow him on social media @MrStevenRowley.



Reviews

What people think about Lily and the Octopus

4.1
115 ratings / 54 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Critic reviews

  • OK, forget about seeing the world from the perspective of a dog for this one. Let's hear from the perspective of a dude who owns an aging dachshund named Lily. And holds conversations with her. More bizarrely and touchingly, he converses with the octopus on top of Lily's head. The octopus is a tumor, by the way. Just so you know what you're getting into. There will be eye rain. (That's what Lily calls tears.)

    Scribd Editors

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This was one of those stories that touched me deeply and had me weeping through parts. Although on the surface it's the story of a man and his aging dog, it's touches on so much of the universal experience of loss and saying goodbye. No spoilers here, so I won't divulge the plot, but just LOVED this story.
  • (3/5)
    This book was strange as in Life of Pi strange but it was fun to read the relationship between Lily and her owner. With some people, their pets are their children. With or dog Lily, she is a second child. Our Lily is 13 and the average lifespan of her breed is 14. We see how she is slowing down, how she can't hear as well as she used to or see as well as she used to. So this book was a little hard for me to read since the dog is named Lily. I know my dog listens to what I tell her, and understands. If you are a dog lover, you will probably enjoy this book.
  • (3/5)
    While this is a very heartfelt story, it seemed a bit too melodramatic. I'm hesitant to write anything more detailed, as I don't want to give away too much of the plot.
  • (3/5)
    On Thursdays, Ted and his dog, Lily, talk about boys they think are cute. They also have movie night and pizza night and play Monopoly together. Ted talks to Lily, and in her own way, Lily talks back.

    The first third of Lily and the Octopus details this relationship, and it's quirky, funny, and touching. Unfortunately Lily is 12 and an Octopus is taking over her head.

    What follows is a dream-like series of events reminiscent of Life of Pi, and I really lost interest at this point, finding it tedious and too far outside of reality for me personally. If you enjoyed the story of Pi and the tiger you would likely enjoy this as well though.

    When the narrative is focused on past and present "real" events, I found it compelling and often forgot that this is a work of fiction, despite the talking dog. I think many of us with dogs are guilty of humanizing them, so this simply doesn't seem so farfetched. I really loved large sections of this book! As a whole, I enjoyed it but struggled at times to maintain the detachment necessary to value it as a work of magical fiction.

    I received this title courtesy of Netgalley and the publisher. I was *very* excited to read it and thank them for making it available!
  • (5/5)
    Such a wonderful book. The writing is amazing.
  • (4/5)
    I knew at the outset that this book would make me cry. Of course.

    Steven Rowley beautifully leads the reader through the layers of grief. Of knowing the loss of a loved one is approaching, and the maze one can run through to avoid, deny, fight, and eventually accept.

    This story has things you'd expect, like how Ted and Lily met, her puppyhood, and their lives together. But there is a surprising amount of imagination and whimsy.

    A really great read!