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UnavailableMilk and Honey
Currently unavailable on Scribd

Milk and Honey

Written by Rupi Kaur

Narrated by Rupi Kaur

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Currently unavailable on Scribd

Milk and Honey

Written by Rupi Kaur

Narrated by Rupi Kaur

ratings:
4/5 (653 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Aug 16, 2016
ISBN:
9781508229629
Format:
Audiobook

Editor's Note

Highly relatable…

Rupi Kaur’s debut collection of poetry has spent over a year on the “New York Times” bestseller list, a rare feat for poetry, considering how many people profess to not “get” the medium. Don’t be intimated by this collection — Kaur’s poems about womanhood are highly relatable and easily accessible.

Description

Milk and Honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. About the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity.

The audiobook is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes listeners through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them—because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Released:
Aug 16, 2016
ISBN:
9781508229629
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

As a 21-year-old university student Rupi Kaur wrote, illustrated, and self-published her first poetry collection, milk and honey. Next came its artistic sibling, the sun and her flowers. These collections have sold over 8 million copies and have been translated into over 40 languages. Her most recent book, home body, debuted #1 on bestseller lists across the world. Rupi’s work touches on love, loss, trauma, healing, femininity, and migration. She feels most at home when creating art or performing her poetry on stage.


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Reviews

What people think about Milk and Honey

4.1
653 ratings / 82 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    I know this collection is kind of controversial, so I suppose that I wanted to make up my own opinion about it. Mostly what I thought as I was reading was, "I would have liked these much more when I was younger." Of course, there is something to be said for capturing that rawness of youth, but most of these didn't have much to say to me.Only one fragment really jumped out at me, and I wanted to record it here --i am losing parts of you like i lose eyelashesunknowingly and everywhere.
  • (4/5)
    This was a very good collection of poetry. I laud it with praise. It's original, insightful, melancholic and realistic all at the same time. Extremely engaging.
  • (5/5)
    A short book of poetry and prose covering a wide array of topics personal to the author including abuse, love, heartbreak, and feminism. Her debut novel, I found it absolutely riveting. The subject matter is pretty mature so I would say adults or older teens only for this one. I actually listened to the audiobook version of this one and it was read by the author, Rupi Kaur, who was absolutely hypnotizing. It was short, just over an hour, but it was powerful and packed with big ideas. It was a read that left me thinking long after it had ended.
  • (5/5)
    I'm not a fan of poetry, but in picking up this book today, I was looking for a strong female voice to cut through the bullshit and provide a tonic against my relatives and the politicians who have been shouting for the past two weeks that we should be very scared and worried for our sons and husbands because of what they see as false #metoo accusations being thrown around by women who are crazy or paid agents.The rawness of Kaur's first section of poems, "The Hurting," was a devastating reminder of why we need to be scared and worried for our daughters, our wives, and the women we don't even know but who deserve to live lives free of toxic and entitled men who abuse them with impunity.After taking me so low, I was surprised that Kaur was then able to lift me up with thoughts of love in the next section, "The Loving." Thankfully, the heartache of "The Breaking" did not take me as low as the first section because I don't think I could have handled that, and the closing, "The Healing," did not lift me as high as the second section since I'm not into self-help aphorisms.I'm not even sure if this is poetry, or simply the most lyrical and moving Twitter feed I've ever read. I just know that it was I needed right now, and for that I am most grateful.
  • (4/5)
    Great collection of poetry.
  • (5/5)
    These poems touched deeply hidden parts of me that I had forgotten about. Beautiful and poignant. Read and be healed!
  • (4/5)
    It seems that I am starting to like poetry. I try another poetry book this year and did not enjoy it so much but I like it this one. Is direct, is brutal and beautiful, the poems make you remember your ex, makes you feel the pain of a bad relationship and make you smile about the good moments. you choose your mood and read a part of the book. There is always something that will go to your heart no wonder why it became a bestseller.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not the biggest reader of poetry. My poetry consumption normally revolves around the collections my brother pushes me to read. I didn't feel much connection to any of the poems. While I normally appreciate interesting formatting and artwork, that aspect didn't capture my attention to any great degree either. I did read this as an ebook, so the format might have something to do with that. While this wasn't a poor collection by any means, I simply didn't feel much connection to it.
  • (3/5)
    Since April was poetry month, I decided to pick up one to read. Since I don't read much poetry, I didn't have a clue which one to choose. Since Milk and Honey has been a NYT bestseller, I decided on this one. The book is divided in four chapters, each with a different theme, possibly compiled during different periods of the 25 year old author's life. The book begins with a woman who suffered an abusive childhood or relationship followed by chapters respectively focused on the emotions of a woman passionately in love, grieving a severed relationship, and ending with verses on psychological healing and exhortations of femininity. Poetry is still not my sustained literary diet; however, the author skillfully transmitted the spectrum of positive and negative emotions through her poetry.
  • (5/5)
    i think this might actually be my favourite book. it's very sweet and simple. don't expect long complicated poems.

    i think it's a book that suits the people who relate to it. it's a personal journey. i can see why some won't like it, but i loved it.

    i would recommend it for later teens to young twenties. i would also recommend it for those who know they like poetry.
  • (4/5)
    If you are thinking about reading this book I'd recommend skipping the first part ... For me, I instantly became meh and confused. That part was so scattered and disconnected that I almost didn't continue...

    However, I'm so glad that I did because I fell in love with the rest. I really related to the breaking part and it opened my eyes to a new perspective. It helped me appreciate the flaws and made me happy I experienced such turmoil. It pulled out emotion and also filled me with inspiration. I think all who have experienced a bad break up will definitely find solace in the pages.

    Overall, I definitely recommend it to readers searching for a word hug. Let this story be a lesson or guidance or just reassurance that no matter what happens you can always overcome it.
  • (4/5)
    4.5 Stars

    This little poetry book is a gem!! Kaur's poems inspired me to write a haiku as my review.

    Short book of poems
    Has me in awe and thinking
    Of loss, life, and love
  • (5/5)
    Wow. This book of poetry was raw, compelling, and impossible to put down. I rushed through it but now I want to start over so I can savor it. It's hauntingly beautiful and easy to relate to. It's broken into four parts: the hurting, the loving, the breaking, and the healing. The poems range in length and some even have accompanying sketches. Rupi Kaur mastered the art of conveying deep emotion with minimal words. I can't get over how beautiful and poignant this collection is. Definitely a poet to keep an eye out for and one whose books I will certainly add to my own personal collection because I know I'll want to revisit her words again and again.
  • (4/5)
    Pros:-Quick Read-Simple-Emotionally Powerful-Clear Tone-Neat Drawings/DoodlesCons:-Can be Emotionally Jarring/Draining-Surprised by mature themes because the title sounded so prettyNotes:-Sentences have "incorrect" grammar, punctuation, capitalization, etc. because the author was inspired by her mother tongue, Punjabi, which has a script that has no distinction between upper and lowercase letters and the only punctuation used is the period. This might make it difficult for some people to read or enjoy (although the writing is not ridiculously complex or long-winded, which makes it easier).-Book format is like snippets of poetic prose (a few people I've seen have thought it ridiculous that the book's entries could be called poetry just because of all the line breaks, but what contributes to something being poetry is the rhythm/feel while reading, and poetic devices such as line breaks is one of the ways to create that. Prose is generally very straightforward and has little to no rhythm (like these review sentences), but that isn't to say that prose doesn't use poetic devices, Shakespeare's writing has probably some of the best examples of this, but you could also use Ellen Hopkins' books or even Cormac McCarthy's "The Road". Basically what makes this poetry instead of a story is an overlying plot or defined characters that connects all the tidbits, although there are poems that act as stories too (like the epics "The Illiad" and "The Odyssey" by Homer), so I guess the lesson of the day is that it doesn't really matter what it's called as long as it resonated with you as a reader, which I guess can depend on whether you like poetic devices or not.)That was a longer and much more rant than review, so my bad, but thanks for reading this because it means you probably read to the bottom :) I hope I didn't sound condescending, sorry if I did, I'm just starting out writing reviews.
  • (3/5)
    This is such a tricky book to review. On the one hand, there is no question that it is brilliantly-written, powerful, and striking a chord with readers. On the other hand, I specifically do not connect with this style of poetry.

    I do recommend this book if you like confessional poetry and the writing styles of authors like John Green. Well done, just not for me.
  • (5/5)
    So this was as good as people said it was. I always have a hard time reviewing poetry and putting what I think about them into words, but what I can say is that I really liked the drawings. I liked how the sketches supplemented the poems. They took the poems to another level because they seemed so candid, honest, and effortless.
  • (5/5)
    you are snakeskin
    and I keep shedding you somehow
    my mind is forgetting
    every exquisite detail
    of your face
    and letting go has
    become the forgetting
    which is the most pleasant and saddest thing
    to have happened


    (pg. 119)

    I'm not usually a poetry fan, but this book spoke to me. Very much a women's perspective on relationships and sexuality and gender. Try it, I think you'll like it.
  • (4/5)
    i am water
    soft enough
    to offer life
    tough enough
    to drown it away


    Milk and Honey is a beautiful book of poetry. That's really the beginning and the end of it. Some of its poems left me almost in tears. Some made me smile. Some made me go damn. All of them touched me.

    It doesn't matter if you find these poems "relatable" or not. There's just something so special and sobering about having someone's innermost thoughts and feelings all laid out on a page for you to read.
  • (4/5)
    I don't read a lot of poetry but I'm very glad that I read this collection of poems. The poetry was beautiful and well written. Some of it was very painful and some of it was full of love. Some of the poems were bitter and difficult and some were full of love and hope and made me think about parts of my life. Thank you for this beautiful book.
  • (5/5)
    I admit I'm not generally drawn to poetry, so I am not the best person to review this on that basis. All I can review is how it made me feel, which was at times sad, angry, hopeful and empowered. Kaur captured loss and empowerment and everything in between in these poems and allowed me to feel her emotions through her words and drawings. I may not know poetry, but I know emotions, and she captured damn near all of them in this collection.
  • (4/5)
    [milk and honey] by rupi kaur 4.0The poems in this book are divided into four sections: the hurting, the loving, the breaking, and the healing and they cover topics like love, sex, rape, finding your voice, feminism, fathers and daughters, and self-acceptance. [milk and honey] is deceptive, for there is nothing sweet about this collection of poetry. It is emotional. Raw. At times, I felt exposed. Again, not my typical kind of poetry. Many are two-liners. Punctuation? What's that? And no titles. But, I set out to read just one poem for the day and wound up reading the whole book. How can it not be my kind of poetry if it is powerful, rips me open, and will stay with me forever? Here's a sampling. I have numbered them since I can't separate them by pages and I don't want anyone to think they are stanzas. Many of them seem like truths.1.you cannot leaveand have me tooi cannot exist intwo places at once- when you ask if we can still be friends2.you tell me to quiet down causemy opinions make me less beautifulbut i was not made with a fire in my bellyso i could be put outi was not made with lightness on my tongueso i could be easy to swallowi was made heavyhalf blade and half silk difficult to forget and not easyfor the mind to follow3.people gobut howthey leftalways stays
  • (4/5)
    Reading the book made me feel nauseous and uncomfortable, so it's good. Good because it is the reality and better because it is felt. I was attacked by the raw emotions and the graphic imagery of it.

    Rupi's pieces are cut in random lines. It was my pet peeve on some point but I suppose this style becomes a fad in modern poetry recently that I have to take to enjoy.
  • (5/5)



    This was just everything. Rupi Kaur gives everything in this book. There is beauty and ugliness, sweetness and sadness, pain and healing. This book makes you feel happy, sad, angry, empowered, and thoughtful all at once. I can see myself in these pages. I can see people I know in these pages. I am reading friends, loved ones, people I love, and hate; people I miss and those I see everyday. I see the author in these words, and she is beautiful and brilliant.Read this book.Poetry is a fairly new thing I'm exploring and this book has helped me to appreciate and love it a little more.


  • (4/5)
    I can be quite picky and severe when it comes to poetry as it has to make me feel, ache, and wonder. It's not an easy task to do. But I'll say this:Rupi Kaur delivered brilliantly. I loved her minimalist approach to most of her poems and their intensity. The word choice is deliberate yet touches one's soul with their truth. In one word? Raw. That's what these poems are - they're so raw they grip your guts and twist them, but their trick? They make you want more!There's only one thing I disliked about it and it was how many talks and references about sex there are. I was growing tired and annoyed of reading about it... It was as though it made up her whole life. I understand it might be important for the majority of people, but it was redundant and vulgar. I didn't expect much from Milk and Honey, but I had a lot of fun (and heartache, let's admit it here) reading this collection. In my opinion, it focuses on love, want, sex, abuse, heartache, and happiness. The writing was a bit surprising because I am used to writing each new verse with capital letters in my own poetry, but Rupi Kaur never used a capital at all! Different, but interesting in its own way.I gave it four stars because how wonderfully emotional it is (positive) and for the overuse of sex (negative). I encourage everyone to read it, mostly women as it tackles difficulties we experience everyday. Be aware that this collection of poems is not soft. You will be shaken, moved, and sometimes even thrown off your feet. But it'll leave a good trace on you.I could go on and on, but really, you just have to try it.
  • (4/5)
    This short read packs a powerful punch. A must-read for anyone and everyone.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful poems about being a woman, love, abuse, sexuality, and pain. Quick read, most of the poems are short, but very powerful.
  • (5/5)
    It was so inspirational and I loved it!
  • (5/5)
    Even better than reading this raw beauty -if you have read it you need to let it speak to you.
  • (5/5)
    This book ripped me apart in the best way! I loved it
  • (3/5)
    A few of the poems were really good and felt genuine and authentic but a lot of them felt like cheesy sayings from a lovesick 7th graders Pinterest.