Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
The Case of the Velvet Claws

The Case of the Velvet Claws


The Case of the Velvet Claws

ratings:
4/5 (22 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Released:
Oct 11, 2016
ISBN:
9781531826833
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Criminal lawyer and bestselling mystery author Erle Stanley Gardner wrote nearly 150 novels that have sold 300 million copies worldwide. Now, the American Bar Association is bringing back his most famous and enduring novels-featuring criminal defense lawyer and sleuth Perry Mason-in striking trade paperback editions.

Married Eva Griffin has been caught with a prominent congressman, and is ready to pay the editor of a sleazy tabloid hush money to protect the politician. But first Perry Mason tracks down the publisher of the blackmailing tabloid and discovers a shocking secret, which eventually leads to Mason being accused of murder.

This is the first Perry Mason mystery and our introduction to secretary Della Street, detective Paul Drake, and the great lawyer himself.

Released:
Oct 11, 2016
ISBN:
9781531826833
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Erle Stanley Gardner (1889–1970) was an author and lawyer who wrote nearly 150 detective and mystery novels that sold more than one million copies each, making him easily the best-selling American writer of his time. He ranks as one of the most prolific specialists of crime fiction due to his popular alter ego, lawyer-detective Perry Mason. A self-taught lawyer, Gardner was admitted to the California bar in 1911 and began defending poor Chinese and Mexicans as well as other clients. Eventually his writing career, which began with the pulps, pushed his law career aside. As proven in his Edgar Award–winning The Court of Last Resort, Gardner never gave up on the cases of wrongly accused individuals or unjustly convicted defendants.  

Related to The Case of the Velvet Claws

Titles In This Series (40)
Related Audiobooks
Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about The Case of the Velvet Claws

4.1
22 ratings / 9 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I have been gathering up Perry Mason books for years ever since i stumbled across a dozen of them for a dime apiece at a local yard sale.....and i am now actually approaching a complete set with only a few left to find.....but i have never read one!!! So, i figured i'd start at the beginning (which i always do if i can) and see if i even would like these after all of this acquisition effort. And i loved it!! I flew through it. I loved the character of Perry Mason, i loved that he was a lawyer, not a private detective like all of the other gumshoe series-type books. But the book was clever, Perry was clever, Della Street, his assistant, was charming, and the story kept my interest. I did not really have time to read this, but i did in record time considering. Thank God! Cuz i've got a ton more to enjoy. Whew.....
  • (5/5)
    Perry Mason in a more of a detective’s role, and that too an aggressive one. Enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    Plot not so good. Excellent audio performance. I have read better cases by the author.
  • (4/5)
    A spoiled woman is keen to keep news of her affairs from her powerful husband, even if it costs Perry his freedom when she swears he was on the murder scene.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Somehow a very stylish legal thriller, incredibly satisfying and clever. A shame that these books aren't re-edited in more decent versions nowadays. You're left with these shabby old paperbacks that do not do justice to the contents.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Usually first novels take some time to build the characters and the relationships; to introduce the dynamics. Gardner somehow manages to pull off his first Mason novel without needing it. The story just starts, backgrounds get revealed when needed and the story just happen. Meet Eva. A married woman that ends up in a bad place at a bad time - with a married man (whom she is not married to) in a semi-public place when a crime happens. Her companion is a politician and finding him there, especially with Eva would have been a disaster (it is the 30s after all - reading from the 21st century, it shows just how much society had moved on). So his (and her name) are suppressed but as at least one person knows, it will never stay a secret. Add a yellow newspaper and things start getting ugly. Especially when the husband of Eva shows up and then dies - and one of his companies ends up being one of the main problems - an ownership noone knew about.Perry Mason tries to help our damsel in distress - and gets himself accused of the murder. Then things turn to the worse. And just when you do not see how things may get resolved, a few surprises and a few explanations are provided and Mason wins the case. You know he will - I am not sure if there is any of those books that do not have him winning - but for a while there, I really could not see how exactly. It is a nicely constructed novel - despite some of the oddities. And especially for a first novel, it is well worth a read, even 8 decades later.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Unlike many others in the Perry Mason series, this novel is not centred on a court room drama, but it does introduce the characters who featured in most other novels in the series: his secretary Della Street, a young woman at this time, and obviously in love with her boss; and private eye Paul Drake who hunts down the facts to back up Perry Mason's quirky theories.It was hard not to see, in my mind's eye, the bulky Raymond Burr who played Perry Mason in the long running television series. And yet, somehow, the central character in this novel does not quite match that tv character.I can see why, even over 80 years on, why this novel was a winner with readers. The characters are well drawn, the action fast-paced and the plot is full of unexpected twists and turns. Perry Mason points out to his client. who constantly lies to him, that he is hardly a novice. He already has files from hundreds of previous cases in his filing cabinets, and he expects to have many more. He specialises in getting people out of holes. Most of the cases he has been involved in are murder cases, and mostly he gets people off. So here is a lawyer who takes on clients regardless of how much they can pay for his services. See more at Wikipedia.THE CASE OF THE VELVET CLAWS was made into a film in 1936. A good read.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Perry really manipulates the truth in this one -- a little manufactured evidence here, a little suborning perjury there -- whoa! This book was atypical because rather than skirting legalities as in other books, he actually breaks the law in this one. His client was a devious, manipulative bitch, but it still seemed out of character for Perry to go this far.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This is my first foray into the written work of Perry Mason. As a child, I probably saw every episode of Perry Mason. The novel did not seem to be the Perry Mason that I remembered. The story took many turns before coming to the conclusion. The novel ran on dialogue, as opposed to lengthy description. The writing reminds me of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett. This is a different style than Agatha Christie and Anne Perry, and each is interesting. I prefer the description as opposed to constant dialogue.

    1 person found this helpful