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Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story

Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story


Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story

ratings:
4.5/5 (30 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 15, 2015
ISBN:
9781494586348
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s account of the first successful large-scale application of nonviolent resistance in America is comprehensive, revelatory, and intimate. King described his book as "the chronicle of 50,000 Negroes who took to heart the principles of nonviolence, who learned to fight for their rights with the weapon of love, and who, in the process, acquired a new estimate of their own human worth." Stride Toward Freedom traces the phenomenal journey of a community and shows how the twenty-six-year-old King, with his conviction for equality and nonviolence, helped transform the nation and the world.
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 15, 2015
ISBN:
9781494586348
Format:
Audiobook

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4.3
30 ratings / 2 Reviews
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  • (5/5)
    Very descriptive writing which easily transports the listener to the setting in which the story takes place.
  • (4/5)
    King’s account of the history of the Montgomery bus boycott. It’s interesting to hear him test out concepts that would become more famous later from other speeches; the book as a whole is far more accommodating to liberals than, say, Letter from Birmingham Jail, though even at this relatively early stage King was talking about economic justice and also about the fact that he might well be killed. According to King, the protestors were initially willing to accept continued segregation as long as they were treated better and not forced to give up seats if they got there first; it was the resistance to even such a mild improvement that pushed them towards demanding integration. The amount of accommodation to whites King is willing to do at this point is fascinating—for example, there are statements about the black community’s need to improve its own standards, familiar even today. By contrast, when it comes to intermarriage, King is indirect but crystal clear: since marriage is a matter of individual choice, no one but the people involved have a right to decide who should get married. King underplays the role of Rosa Parks and other women in the civil rights movement, and there’s a jarring point at the end when he says that wage equality for black and white men is really important to everyone’s family because women should stay at home: paying black men more will allow black women to stay home, and then white women won’t be able to have their kids raised by black women and will also have to stay home. Another reminder that visions of justice are, even among great heroes, often partial.