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Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity

Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity

Written by Kimberly Scott

Narrated by Kimberly Scott


Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity

Written by Kimberly Scott

Narrated by Kimberly Scott

ratings:
4.5/5 (112 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 14, 2017
ISBN:
9781427283139
Format:
Audiobook

Description

From the time we learn to speak, we’re told that if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all. While this advice may work for everyday life, it is, as Kim Scott has seen, a disaster when adopted by managers.

Scott earned her stripes as a highly successful manager at Google and then decamped to Apple, where she developed a class on optimal management. She has earned growing fame in recent years with her vital new approach to effective management, the “radical candor” method.

Radical candor is the sweet spot between managers who are obnoxiously aggressive on one side and ruinously empathetic on the other. It’s about providing guidance, which involves a mix of praise as well as criticism—delivered to produce better results and help employees achieve.

Great bosses have strong relationships with their employees, and Scott has identified three simple principles for building better relationships with your employees: make it personal, get (sh)it done, and understand why it matters.

Radical Candor offers a guide to those bewildered or exhausted by management, written for bosses and those who manage bosses. Taken from years of the author’s experience, and distilled clearly giving actionable lessons to the listener; it shows managers how to be successful while retaining their humanity, finding meaning in their job, and creating an environment where people both love their work and their colleagues.

Publisher:
Released:
Mar 14, 2017
ISBN:
9781427283139
Format:
Audiobook

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Reviews

What people think about Radical Candor

4.6
112 ratings / 11 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I read this book based on a recommendation that stated that it is not just empty Silicon Valley chatter, and this recommendation was mostly proven right. While it was not able to completely loose the over-the-top style of all US self-improvement books ("Do this and your whole life will benefit from it! Your work will be better, your relationships will be improved, and your dog will like you more!") and contained a moderate amount of Silicon Valley name-dropping, I found it quite interesting and helpful. (And, in fairness, the name-dropping was mostly in the context of telling stories about the observed behaviour of other managers, so it was actually a useful part of the book).

    I'm not a manager, but as a PhD student, I supervise a number of student theses each year, so I read this book with the intent of seeing which of the techniques may be transferrable to my situation. In my situation, establishing a good relationship with the "direct reports" (i.e., students) is both easier (we are almost the same age, and my supervision style is fairly informal and non-authoritarian to begin with) and harder (the students are only around for half a year).

    I have taken a few of the tips about meetings and feedback style to heart, and it has actually already proven helpful with one of my students. On the other hand, many parts of the book were irrelevant to my situation (I don't write yearly performance reports, I grade a thesis) and in some cases, the hints were impossible to do (at a certain point, I am discouraged from working directly with the students to find a solution for their problems, as their problem-solving skills are what I am supposed to grade - so there's a fine balance between being helpful and being able to gauge their problem-solving skills).

    In the end, I'm going to go with 4.5 stars (half a star deducted for the over-the-top style and a few other nitpicks), rounded up to five stars for the simple reason that the book describes the sort of boss I would want to have (and I would hope to be, if I ever end up being a boss / manager somewhere).
  • (5/5)
    I... don't know why I keep reading/bookmarking management books--I'm not a manager--but this one was pretty interesting. "Radical candor" involves "caring personally and challenging directly" -- being open and honest with your co-workers and the people you manage, and encourage them to do the same, instead of keeping things impersonal and avoiding conflict. (With all sorts of buzzwords and charts; this is a management book after all).You want to get to know the people you manage: their goals, their values, their "trajectories" (job goals), etc. People should be able to bring their whole self to work (something I wouldn't be able to appreciate until now, because I really do feel more like my normal-not-at-work self at my current job than I ever have. It's almost weird.)It sounds stupidly obvious, but actually implementing something like that is tricky. The one-on-one meetings she kept mentioning seemed ridiculous and unwieldy until the very last chapter: "I quit thinking of them as meetings and begin treating them as if I were having lunch or coffee with somebody"... suddenly, yeah, duh, that's how all the best planning happens, and the best way to check in with someone.I'd highly recommend this for any sort of manager, really.
  • (5/5)
    This is just not about principles and theory about how to evolve as a better engineering leader with care and guidance for the team, but they walk through the real life examples and derive the principles from it. Highly recommend for personal development for every engineering leader.
  • (3/5)
    Similar to another review, I felt this could have been more succinct. There are some useful charts that are described here, which naturally loses some of its effect.
  • (5/5)
    Radical Candor by Kim Scott touches on common, specific issues faced by people in management that are not discussed in business school or in the workplace. Reading Radical Candor will not only make you a better boss, but also a better employee if you are not currently a manager. This is a great read if you aspire to be a manager. Scott offers easy, in-depth yet simple to understand ways to be a better boss, create an engaged, high performing team and improve team morale.
  • (5/5)
    Really good book, a lot of excellent ideas. I advise!
  • (5/5)
    For years I’ve been referencing and sharing Kim Scott’s Fast Company article about Radical Candor, yet put off reading the book for years. I wish I had read it earlier! About halfway through I decided to stop underlining since I was underlining 80% of the book.It’s the balance of caring personally to earn real trust that allows for a level of candidness that I think is hard for most workplaces to achieve. She has lots of good examples and data as well as very specific ways to implement
  • (5/5)
    Must read for any leader. Continue to be an understanding human being while holding to high expectations/ accountability.
  • (5/5)
    This book broke down great leadership skills, the benefits of them and how to action then. Quick read with huge benefits !
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Great insight on how various different company cultures can still benefit from some common best practices.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I like the message, but this could have been a blog post.

    1 person found this helpful