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Posted

Posted

Written by John David Anderson

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor


Posted

Written by John David Anderson

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor

ratings:
4/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 2, 2017
ISBN:
9780062682468
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

From John David Anderson, author of the acclaimed Ms. Bixby's Last Day, comes a humorous, poignant, and original contemporary story about bullying, broken friendships, and the failures of communication between kids.

In middle school, words aren't just words. They can be weapons. They can be gifts. The right words can win you friends or make you enemies. They can come back to haunt you. Sometimes they can change things forever.

When cell phones are banned at Branton Middle School, Frost and his friends Deedee, Wolf, and Bench come up with a new way to communicate: leaving sticky notes for each other all around the school. It catches on, and soon all the kids in school are leaving notes-though for every kind and friendly one, there is a cutting and cruel one as well.

In the middle of this, a new girl named Rose arrives at school and sits at Frost's lunch table. Rose is not like anyone else at Branton Middle School, and it's clear that the close circle of friends Frost has made for himself won't easily hold another. As the sticky-note war escalates, and the pressure to choose sides mounts, Frost soon realizes that after this year, nothing will ever be the same.

Publisher:
Released:
May 2, 2017
ISBN:
9780062682468
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

John David Anderson is the author of many highly acclaimed books for kids, including the New York Times Notable Book Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, Posted, Granted, Sidekicked, The Dungeoneers, and Finding Orion. A dedicated root beer connoisseur and chocolate fiend, he lives with his wonderful wife, two frawesome kids, and clumsy cat, Smudge, in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can visit him online at www.johndavidanderson.org.


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Reviews

What people think about Posted

4.0
21 ratings / 4 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Frost tells the story of his friends during their 8th grade year where the dynamics of the relationships shift when a new girl moves to town and the great post-it war takes place.
  • (3/5)
    Posted was okay but not as good as I had thought when I picked it. Interesting premise that got sidelined somewhere with relationships. Not that its bad, just that it made the whole 'Postes' premise second.
  • (1/5)
    The story jumps to part to part with no explanation, it’s just confusing
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I rarely give a book 5 stars…but this one is a 5 star! The only issue that I have with this book is the length. It’s 365 pages, and that may turn many of my students away. Amazon lists this as a book for 8-12 year olds, and I originally bought it for my elementary. After reading it, I’m going to move it up to my Jr.-Sr. High as I think it would be more appropriate for ages 12 and up. When the principal and teachers of Branton Middle School have had enough of the constant cell phone use amongst the students (and the inappropriate texts and social media posts), they decide that cell phones are outlawed in school. However, soon a new form of communication takes over the school. Students begin leaving messages on post-it notes on each other’s lockers and bookbags as well as in textbooks and in the bathrooms. Although the messages start out innocuous, just like the texts and social media posts, some of the post-it messages turn hurtful, but with the anonymous paper messages, no one knows who is writing the cruel messages. Eric’s mother has told him that everyone has “their people”…they just have to find them. Eric (or, “Frost” as he is known to the rest of the middle schoolers) has three best friends, DeeDee, Wolf, and Bench. Although they are all different, they stick together and have maneuvered the perils of middle school together, at least up until a new girl moves to town. Rose is a girl who stands out in a crowd…mostly because she is taller and broader than any of the other kids in school. When Wolf invites Rose to sit with them at their table for lunch, not all of the group is happy…how will the boys handle the addition of another person into their group? Will they cave in to peer pressure when the other students in school tease them and talk about them behind their backs? What happens with a group of friends when they realize that they have different interests? This book is a wonderful story of the power of words. (Not only in the school…but also in situations with Eric’s parents, who are going through a divorce). And, although the book has a satisfying ending, it’s not really an “everyone lived happily ever after” ending either. Mean kids are still mean, friends change, and just saying “I’m sorry” doesn’t always mean that everything will go back to “normal”. The author really understands middle school-aged kids, their problems and their humor; however, as another reviewer on Amazon commented, if he would shave about 100 pages off of the book it would have more appeal for his target audience. There is middle school humor – like comparing Cheese Puffs to “turds”, and Wolf is teased for being gay (although there are a few insinuations, like Rose telling Frost that “he doesn’t like me because I’m not his type” the author never comes out and reveals whether Wolf is or isn’t gay – I presumed that he was, but it was handled more as a message that we label people and make presumptions about people based on the things they do, the way they dress, etc.) I could see this book becoming a movie someday!

    1 person found this helpful