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One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter: Essays

One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter: Essays

Written by Scaachi Koul

Narrated by Scaachi Koul


One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter: Essays

Written by Scaachi Koul

Narrated by Scaachi Koul

ratings:
4/5 (68 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 2, 2017
ISBN:
9781427291417
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

This program is read by the author. A DEBUT COLLECTION OF FIERCE, FUNNY ESSAYS ABOUT GROWING UP THE DAUGHTER OF INDIAN IMMIGRANTS IN WESTERN CULTURE, ADDRESSING SEXISM, STEREOTYPES, AND THE UNIVERSAL MISERIES OF LIFE

In One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, Scaachi Koul deploys her razor-sharp humor to share all the fears, outrages, and mortifying moments of her life. She learned from an early age what made her miserable, and for Scaachi anything can be cause for despair. Whether it's a shopping trip gone awry; enduring awkward conversations with her bikini waxer; overcoming her fear of flying while vacationing halfway around the world; dealing with Internet
trolls, or navigating the fears and anxieties of her parents. Alongside these personal stories are pointed observations about life as a woman of color: where every aspect of her appearance is open for critique, derision, or outright scorn; where strict gender rules bind in both Western and Indian cultures, leaving little room for a woman not solely focused on marriage and children to have a career (and a life) for herself.

With a sharp eye and biting wit, incomparable rising star and cultural observer Scaachi Koul offers a hilarious, scathing, and honest look at modern life.
Publisher:
Released:
May 2, 2017
ISBN:
9781427291417
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Scaachi Koul was born and raised in Calgary, Alberta, and is a culture writer for BuzzFeed. Her writing has also appeared in The New Yorker, The Hairpin, The Globe and Mail, and Jezebel. One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter is her first book. She lives in Toronto.



Reviews

What people think about One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter

4.0
68 ratings / 12 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    A collection of essays from a Canadian journalist at Buzzfeed in which she reflects on the experience of being the child of immigrants, finding her way between two cultures, the experience of being brown, and her experiences as a woman. Funny and scathing, Koul is an intriguing voice.
  • (4/5)
    This essay collection is dryly funny, while taking on issues of culture, gender, and class. The fact that she refers to her boyfriend as Hamhock throughout the book is my favorite.
  • (4/5)
    Best for: People who enjoy strong, witty writers who are able to handle fluffy and serious topics with equal finesse.

    In a nutshell: Scaachi Koul shares some snipets of her life as the child of Indian immigrant now living in Canada.

    Line that sticks with me: “It changes you, when you see someone similar to you, doing the thing you might want to do yourself.” (p 123)

    Why I chose it: Because Lindy West, Jessica Valenti and Samantha Irby can’t all be wrong.

    Review: I’d seen this book in my local bookstore a bunch of times and always walked past it because I thought it was a much more serious book. I didn’t fully process that the title was more of a joke than some clever way of of being hopeful (I’ve got the cover uploaded here so hopefully you see what I mean); that’s on me. Then I finally picked it up and flipped it over, and three of my favorite authors — and just generally awesome women — provided the blurbs. So obviously I purchased it immediately.

    This is a collection of loosely connected essays in which Ms. Koul shares her perspective as a woman whose parents immigrated to Canada from India before she was born. She talks about body issues (the chapter on body hair is amazing), about being lighter skinned than other Indians. She talks about online harassment and rape culture.

    I enjoyed Ms. Koul’s style of writing and her wit. Not everything is a laugh out loud joke, and some parts and extremely serious, but the book never feels heavy in a bad way. She somehow makes challenging topics feel manageable, if that makes sense. I’m so happy I got this book, and look forward to reading more from her.
  • (3/5)
    I needed to younger to relate to this series of short stories about being the child of Indian immigrants to Canada. There were plenty of funny stories and it was interesting listening to her interactions with her south Asian culture, but I wasn’t pulled into the story.
  • (3/5)
    I first heard about Scaachi Koul's One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter several months ago on BookTube (I will continue to sing its praises) and added it to my TRL as I felt the need to read more Canadian authors. This book is a collection of essays about Scaachi's life growing up as a child of Indian immigrants in Canada. There's a focus on body positivity, feminism, and the endemic racism she and other people of color face in that country. She discusses her family and how she is the direct product of two disparate parenting philosophies. (Each chapter begins with an email conversation between herself and her father. He's quite possibly the funniest man on planet earth.) She's deeply afraid of going outside of her comfort zone and yet she's in a relationship with a man who seems to do nothing but push her to do just that. (I thought I had travel anxiety until I read about her experiences flying.) It's a look into a family as different and yet somehow the same as mine or yours. There's always going to be some neuroses in any family. It's about self-discovery, self-love, and ultimately self-acceptance. It was a lot of fun but judging from the fact that I had to refresh my memory by looking up the blurb it isn't the most memorable book I've had the pleasure of reading this year. So I'm gonna give it a 6/10.
  • (4/5)
    This did the opposite for me of Lincoln in the Bardo which I finished in the same day. Starting out I wasn't sure but by the end I was sold. I loved her way of inserting jabs and topics into series essays. I also really enjoyed her talking about family, and parents. I could really connect, especially on that last essay - my mom does the exact same thing her father does and it was a really hard and excellent note to end the collection on. I think if you like these feminist, woman-on-the-internet, kind of collections this is a good one. It certainly won't be for everyone, but I found parts I could really connect with.