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Scion of Cyador

Scion of Cyador

Written by L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

Narrated by Kirby Heyborne


Scion of Cyador

Written by L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

Narrated by Kirby Heyborne

ratings:
4/5 (5 ratings)
Length:
25 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 24, 2014
ISBN:
9781452686875
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Scion of Cyador continues the story begun in Magi'i of Cyador. Exploring the rich depths of the history of Recluce, Magi'i introduced Lorn, a talented boy born into a family of Magi'i. A fastidious student mage who lacked blind devotion, Lorn was made into a lancer officer and shipped off to the frontier.

Having survived an extended stint fighting both barbarian raiders and the giant beasts of the Accursed Forest, Lorn has proven himself to be a fine officer . . . perhaps too fine an officer. As his prowess has grown, so has his number of enemies and rivals. Too much success has made him a marked man. When he returns to his home, both he and his young family become targets, while all of Cyad is in upheaval over the death of the Emperor.

Publisher:
Released:
Jun 24, 2014
ISBN:
9781452686875
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

L. E. Modesitt, Jr., is the bestselling author of the fantasy series The Saga of Recluce, Corean Chronicles, and the Imager Portfolio. His science fiction includes Adiamante, the Ecolitan novels, the Forever Hero Trilogy, and Archform: Beauty. Besides a writer, Modesitt has been a U.S. Navy pilot, a director of research for a political campaign, legislative assistant and staff director for a U.S. Congressman, Director of Legislation and Congressional Relations for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a consultant on environmental, regulatory, and communications issues, and a college lecturer. He lives in Cedar City, Utah.


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What people think about Scion of Cyador

4.0
5 ratings / 4 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The second half of the Lorn-focused books. I like it at least as much as the first - it's a little less repetitive and Lorn's adventures are broader in scope and importance. The stilted language still bugs me a little, but plotwise the pieces fit together nicely and it comes to a satisfying conclusion.

    I have some minor quibbles with the worldbuilding. much is made of the mystery of the founders of the empire, but it was only founded two hundred years prior - that's really not very far in terms of overlapping lifespans. And there's some great historic emperor who is likewise mysterious, but in that timespan there's really no way he's more than a few generations removed from the current one. I suspect Modesitt, being American, made some unthinking assumptions about number of rulers per generation and rapidity of change that aren't really held up by logic, particularly given that this culture is stagnant-to-declining technologically and extremely conservative socially.
  • (4/5)
    A good read. The book set up that he was going to end up being the ruler, and I plowed through the book to see how it would happen. I rather liked Lorn. The different culture, Hamor, is interesting.
  • (4/5)
    One of the first books of the Recluse saga chronologically, it is one of my favorites in the series.
  • (3/5)
    Normally I enjoy the Recluse saga books, but this one had a couple of aspects that threw me off. First, the writing seemed different than Modesitt's normal style. In many parts, it was very simplistic. It had a very 'Run Spot Run' feel, as the character was very deliberate and simple, and he tried to change his writing style to convey that. However, the character was anything but simple. This book also featured even more political maneuvering than usual. At times it felt like there was something going on that we were supposed to understand, but it just wasn't coming together. In general this was a novel quite unlike his others, in both style and content. It was about Cyador, back in the 'good old days' when chaos wasn't quite so evil, and there were still some artifacts left over from the founding. I guess he felt it was time to write about people on the other side of the conflict, it just didn't work as well.