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Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Pedro Sanchez


Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Pedro Sanchez

ratings:
4.5/5 (129 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Released:
May 30, 2017
ISBN:
9781418598365
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

El eterno clásico sobre ""las últimas novedades del Infierno y las irrebatibles respuestas del Cielo"" Esta clásica obra maestra de sátira ha entretenido e iluminado a lectores alrededor del mundo con su irónica y astuta representación de la vida y las debilidades humanas desde el punto de vista de Escrutopo, el asistente de alto rango de ""Nuestro Padre de Abajo."" En este divertidísimo, muy serio y excepcionalmente original libro, C. S. Lewis comparte con nosotros la correspondencia entre el viejo diablo y su sobrino Orugario, un novato demonio encargado de asegurarse de la condenación de un joven hombre. Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino es la historia más atractiva acerca de la tentación -- y el triunfo sobre ella -- jamás escrita.

Released:
May 30, 2017
ISBN:
9781418598365
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.


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What people think about Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino

4.4
129 ratings / 98 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    A senior devil gives advice on tempting humans to his nephew, a junior devil
  • (5/5)
    what a reflection! shows how easily we are manipulated into wrongdoing.
  • (3/5)
    A creative piece of Christian apologetics by one of the 20th century's greatest. This volume also includes the addendum "Screwtape Proposes a Toast," published in 1959. Of out all the Lewis I've read so far, I'm still most partial to The Abolition of Man. His writing in The Screwtape Letters is technically good as ever, but he doesn't here achieve the same excellence of style that he does elsewhere. And since I find all of his apologetical arguments weak, appreciation for good writing is one of the main reasons why I bother to read him at all. The Screwtape Letters is frequently clumsy, mechanical (Lewis admits in the preface that "the device of diabolical letters, once you have thought of it, exploits itself spontaneously"), and even gimmicky. Fortunately, the book is short and can be read in a couple hours so long as you don't feel guilty about skimming a bit.
  • (4/5)
    A very illuminating look at how we are constantly tempted in small ways. I recommend this to book to every Christian. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer!
  • (1/5)
    I'm really not sure what the author was going for but this was not fun to read. It was not funny or clever or even especially original. There was a point when I though Lewis was going to use a plot twist to improve the story (when Screwtape start apologizing for his excessive language) but that patched itself up too nicely.

    There was really no conflict or antagonist (or even protagonist, for that matter). All in all it was a dull book that came of more like a poor man's sermon than viable literature. Truly disappointing!
  • (4/5)
    A good book that I would suggest to anyone. The premise of the book is a set of letters that Screwtape (a demon in the administrative department of hell) is writing to his nephew Wormwood (who is a demon new to the tempting job). At first the introduction of it made me wonder exactly how Lewis wrote these letters since it made me think that he did not write them himself at all but instead derived them from some outside source, this was not the case though. The letters were great to read and touched on every small aspect of temptations and the Christian life. There were many times I could see how these things have played themselves out in my life and made me want to re-evaluate many things. Along with the book being an easy read while still personally challenging it had many quotable quotes found within the pages. About every other letter there would be one line that would just jump out at me. Looking back I wish I had of written each of these down since they encapsulated the major points in the book to me at least. For instance, one set of advice Screwtape gave was "do not allow your patient (which was how they talked about the man to whom Wormwood was assigned) to pray in a fashion of not to who I think you are but to who you know you are". That's very fuzzy and I cannot quite get my words down in the way I would want them to be said. Secondly on the second part of the book, Screwtape proposes a toast, this was written several years after the letters and was included in the book I have. It was short, only a few pages long in the edition I have, but if I skipped it I do not feel as though I would have lost any value in reading the book. So if you do read this book and you are tired at that point, I would recommend not reading that part simply because I did not see much value in it and found that Lewis was trying very hard just to get something out on paper. Lastly in the way it was written, you will know that it was written in an old British proper language, but this did not hinder my ability into being able to read and understand the book
  • (3/5)
    The Screwtape Letters is a collection of letters from Screwtape, an experienced, senior level demon, to his nephew, Wormwood, on how to tempt his 'patient' away from God. Each of Screwtape's letters offers advice to his nephew on the using the human mind and logic to turn his patient to "Our Father Below". All of the letters analyze the actions and thoughts of humans. Screwtape is the master of reverse theology; however, he doesn't have much patience. This novel connects to our theme because it shows the journey the patient is going thorough as Wormwood tries to destroy his Christianity. In the background of the correspondence between Screwtape and Wormwood, there is the saga of one man’s spiritual battle. He is attempting to find God while dealing with the many temptations presented by Wormwood. His search for himself is the main focus of the two main characters. Overall, The Screwtape Letters was a good book. It presented many interesting ideas and made me think about my own actions and the motivations behind them. However, I found it tended to slow down and drag on at certain points. If you want to see a different perspective on spiritual struggles, then I would recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Lewis adopts the old epistlatory technique to serve his ends of Christian apology, and with delightful results. Whether or not one accepts and agrees with Lewis's theology, his style and method win the reader's approbation.Screwtape is a senior demon in Hell writing advice to his protege on the front lines here on Earth. As Lewis himself remarked, once one hits upon the concept, the execution is fairly easy. Simply take standard moral advice and turn them inside out, upside down, or backwards.
  • (5/5)
    The Screwtape Letters was written by C.S.Lewis in 1942 with WW2 as the backdrop. This is a series of letters (epistolary style literary work) written by Screwtape to his young nephew, Wormwood, advising him on how to secure the soul of 'the patient'. It also contained the sequel, Screwtape Proposes a Toast in which Screwtape addressed the graduating class of tempters. This was published in 1959 and addresses the politics of the post war world. C.S.Lewis uses this satirical format to address the Christian life. Many of the chapters discuss love. Letter 19 addresses God's love for humanity. Letter 26 addresses courtship. I also very much enjoyed the letters on time, reality, music and noise. There is so much in this little book that rereading it many times would not exhaust the nuggets of truth.
  • (4/5)
    I don't consider myself a particularly religious person, but I enjoyed The Screwtape Letter immensely. It has a lot of great observations on life and what it means to be a person that can be enjoyed by everyone, not just the Christians or prospective Christians that Lewis was writing towards.

    Favorite quote:

    "All mortals tend to turn into the thing they are pretending to be. This is elementary."
  • (5/5)
    An entertaining bit of fiction with a real world insight into the spiritual warfare behind our surface existence. If you choose to listen to a recorded version of this, be sure to get the one recorded by John Cleese: priceless.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed reading this book, especially because it took on such a different view of Christianity. CS Lewis does a great job at really contrasting God and the Devil. In church I have come to hear God referenced as 'Our Heavenly Father' and the devil as 'The enemy.'. This book shows it from the point of view where God has now become the enemy. I had never thought about in that way before. Just as God desires for humans to resist the temptations and sins given by demons, the demons desire for humans to cling to this temptation. While God is viewed as one who cares about others, the devil is one that only cares about himself. He feels that God has an alternate plan that he has not disclosed and the devil wants to find out what it is. He doesn't believe in hope or even love, only sin, desire, and selfishness. I felt that this was a really good book to read for someone who feels strong in their beliefs and can really take the time to analyze and think about this book.
  • (5/5)
    Or, How To Drive the Living Hell Out of Thoughtful Christians. As a moral theologian, this is Lewis at his absolute best. Unlike his other more theological works, here he gets to mix in fiction and fantasy with his musings, and he does so wonderfully. The "plot," as you probably know, is the temptation of a man by a Junior temptor who is given advice by his uncle and senior, Screwtape. Lewis lays bare many traps of modern thinking as well as the traps of ancient moral spirituality. (The Seven Deadly Sins were once the Eight Deadly Ideas, the point being that it is our thinking that gets in our way.)
  • (5/5)
    A unique approach but the plot is a little thin and the book is short
  • (5/5)
    Excellent full-cast dramatization of this C. S. Lewis classic."Diabolical" Radio Theater at its best."The story is carried by the senior demon Screwtape played magnificently by award-winning actor Andy Serkis (“Gollum” in Lord of the Rings) as he shares correspondence to his apprentice demon Wormwood." (from audio jacket)4.5 ★
  • (5/5)
    Incisive, brilliant, and entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    This book is part of my C.S. Lewis collection. I went through a huge phase where I was just obsessed with anything and everything by him. While I don't agree with all of his theology, I do love his writing style and the things he has to say about faith. He was a good one.
  • (5/5)
    deep, thought-provoking, chilling
  • (3/5)
    'The Screwtape Letters' was not an easy read for me. I thought the content and the perspective were interesting, but I don't think I fully understood everything so it was harder to appreciate it. I'll probably come back to this book in a few years.
  • (5/5)
    The Screwtape Letters was a really great story. It was insightful and convicting all the while being entertaining.Right off the bat, the unusual perspective had me hooked. A story about good, told from the perspective of evil; it's not something I would have ever thought of myself. Tucked between moments that made me laugh were also convicting reminders and insights on how sin finds its way into my life. I will definitely keep this book on my list of recommended reading.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent spiritual advice, memorable writing (sometimes extremely funny in a thoroughly deadpan way), and Calvin's first-grade teacher. I would say that the only problem with this book is that it isn't longer, but that would be a reflex -- it's diminuitive, at 209 pages of liberally-spaced type, but in that small space it does everything that it wants to, and then some. A masterpiece even by Lewis' standards.
  • (1/5)
    Try as I may, I find C.S.Lewis nearly impossible to read. Maybe that is because I have little interest in living a good Christian life -- as portrayed by a British professor of literature, writing at the time of the second world war. His basis premise seems to be that God and the Devil have some "interest" in the way human beings are living their lives. Both are trying to influence that. I just can't for the life of me understand why a God would want to do that. I mean if God is all powerful why couldn't he just create the perfect man and be done with it, why would he have to go around trying to find ways to improve on his design? And what benefit does the devil get by getting the human to do evil and collecting the odd soul? The whole subject is patently ridiculous. And to try to cast an argument, which is dubious at best, using the technique of diabolic ventriloquism or photographic negative is mind boggling. At the end what are we supposed to get out of this -- pure knowledge? an understanding of Lewis' philosophy? or just a chuckle? If it is the chuckle, then I would divide the causes of such a chuckle into Joy, Fun, the Joke Proper, and Flippancy. And I would relegate Lewis to the flippant. "It is a thousand miles away from joy; it deadens, instead of sharpening, the intellect; and it excites no affection between those who practice it." (Page 51 Screwtape.)
  • (2/5)
    I think that maybe as a non-Christian I missed a lot of the subtleties and enjoyment this book had to offer. I feel like I read it in a glazed-over state where nothing really penetrated or stuck with me. That said, it wasn't horrible.
  • (5/5)
    Insightful and revealing. I learned so much about myself. A most read for all Christians
  • (5/5)
    Who among us has never wondered if there might not really be a tempter sitting on our shoulders or dogging our steps? C.S. Lewis dispels all doubts. In The Screwtape Letters, one of his bestselling works, we are made privy to the instructional correspondence between a senior demon, Screwtape, and his wannabe diabolical nephew Wormwood. As mentor, Screwtape coaches Wormwood in the finer points, tempting his "patient" away from God.Each letter is a masterpiece of reverse theology, giving the reader an inside look at the thinking and means of temptation. Tempters, according to Lewis, have two motives: the first is fear of punishment, the second a hunger to consume or dominate other beings. On the other hand, the goal of the Creator is to woo us unto himself or to transform us through his love from "tools into servants and servants into sons." It is the dichotomy between being consumed and subsumed completely into another's identity or being liberated to be utterly ourselves that Lewis explores with his razor-sharp insight and wit.
  • (5/5)
    A truly phenomenal study. I thoroughly enjoyed this one.
  • (4/5)
    This would actually be 3.5 stars if I could give it. I tried reading this without knowing what it was all about and got really confused. I almost gave up then read about the book a bit and tried again. Lewis is definitely a smart guy and at a times an absolutely wonderful writer. The only thing that turns me off is his "heavy-handedness" or righteousness when it comes to religion/morality etc...So it was a cool idea to have a big demon giving a little demon advice on how to capture a human soul for "our father below" and the writing/insites was/were really amazing at times. The length was perfect, it was getting a little repetitive toward the end. But as a non-christian it wasn't as "moving" as it would probably be for chistians reading it.
  • (4/5)
    enjoyed it although it was hard for me to get through it
  • (4/5)
    In Screwtapes' letters and toast, Lewis creates an utterly mundane Hell, filled with bureaucrats and researchers, secret police and cooks. The contrast between this mundanity and the supposed Eternal Torture-Hole of the Damned is an amusing thread throughout the letters, as is the very glee that Screwtape shows while dissecting the finer points of Underwordly strategy.
  • (4/5)
    I came to this work expecting it to be a clever yet annoying apologetic for Mr. Lewis' vision of Christianity. While it is an apologia, it's remarkably fun listening. Mr. Lewis puts into Screwtape's letters some things he probably couldn't have gotten away with in a different format. I'm not sure, but it certainly seems like there were some very direct personal jabs in "Screwtape's" letters. Much to my surprise, there is a whole lot of really juicy insights into human psychology and the human condition here. Even when I disagree with his conclusions (most of the time) I have to admire his insights.

    I also have to admire his rhetorical skills. For all that I disagree with him, I wouldn't want to debate him. The man is damn good at constructing a logical argument.

    If I were a younger person, and had been raised in Mr. Lewis' variety of Christianity, I probably would have loved this work. I imagine a lot of liberal Christians take great comfort in Mr. Lewis's implicit contention that loveing Christianity is objectively true. I can see why this work has stayed so popular for so long.

    Weirdly enough, this felt less directly didactic than his Narnia books. Then again, I read the Narnia series expecting a fantasy adventure story. If I had expected it to be apologetics in fantasy form I might have felt less beaten by the metaphor hammer.

    I am very likely to re-read this one. While "simply" a series of letters, what Screwtapes includes and excludes from his letters shapes a story with a lot of depth and complexity. Aside from that, this is worth examining for the quality and depth of the rhetorical/argumentation skills displayed. I think I can learn alot about constructing persuasive arguments from this work.