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Mero Cristianismo

Mero Cristianismo

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Pedro Sanchez


Mero Cristianismo

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Pedro Sanchez

ratings:
4.5/5 (80 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Released:
Jul 25, 2017
ISBN:
9781418598334
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

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Also available as bookBook

Description

Esta obra poderosa y práctica es una de las más populares y queridas introducciones a la fe cristiana jamás escrita Mero Cristianismo reúne las legendarias charlas radiofónicas de C. S. Lewis que se transmitieron durante tiempos de guerra, charlas en las cuales él se proponía ""explicar y defender las creencias que han sido común a casi todos los cristianos de todos los tiempos."" Rechazando los límites que dividen las distintas denominaciones del cristianismo, C. S. Lewis ofrece una inigualable oportunidad al creyente y al no creyente para escuchar un argumento fuerte y racional para la fe cristiana. Esta es una colección de la genialidad de Lewis que aún se mantiene viva para el lector moderno y que a la vez confirma su reputación como el escritor y pensador más importante de nuestros tiempos. Mero Cristianismo es su libro más popular y ha vendido millones de ejemplares a través del mundo.
Released:
Jul 25, 2017
ISBN:
9781418598334
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.


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4.4
80 ratings / 100 Reviews
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  • (4/5)
    CS Lewis is a brilliant man who is far more logical than I am myself. Because of that, I must admit, I didn't fully understand the entirety of the book. I had a hard time reading it because this type of book (but really any book that doesn't have a fictional plot line) is hard for me to get into and hold an interest in. But that is really on me and not on Lewis. He's a fantastic writer and makes some excellent points on Christianity in this book. There wasn't anything that I disagreed with, either. However, the reason I picked the book up was for a class I'm taking and otherwise, probably wouldn't have read it all. Still, I do recommend it for Christians and non-Christians alike, especially if one is curious about what Christianity is. The only reason I didn't give a full five star review was simply because this is not my kind of book.
  • (5/5)
    The 20th century's greatest apologist, C.S. Lewis explains why Christianity is reasonable and introduces the basics of the faith in Mere Christianity, his greatest apologetic work. Despite Lewis' deep learning, the narrative has a friendly and occasionally chatty tone since these chapters were originally delivered live over the radio to the people of Great Britain during World War Two. Lewis presumes very little familiarity with Christian doctrine and avoids all sectarian and denominational questions; he begins with arguments from common sense rather than history or theology, making this the perfect book for someone who doesn't yet know much about Christianity. This work is the classic of the "introduction to Christianity" genre, the standard by which all others are measured. ~~ Ryan Hammill, SMCC Parishioner
  • (3/5)
    Pretty deep. Had to read it slowly.
  • (5/5)
    The contents of this book were first given on the air, and then published in three separate parts as The Case for Christianity (1943), Christian Behaviour (1943), and Beyond Personality (1945) with edits he made only to make his broadcast have the same emphasis in the written form. The author has gone to great effort to write in the spirit of common Christianity and not delve into specific doctrine. More of what units us to Christianity and in his way the author has. Though I felt he was light on some areas of theology this was not what the author was writing about so I read it with an open heart. The author is humble and I believe honest in his writings and this is a good introductory book on Christian apologetics.
  • (5/5)
    This book is part of my C.S. Lewis collection. I went through a huge phase where I was just obsessed with anything and everything by him. While I don't agree with all of his theology, I do love his writing style and the things he has to say about faith. He was a good one.
  • (5/5)
    I found it a breeze to read. He admits his status as a layman, and tries to make the broadest appeal. I doubt he has or will convince anyone of his position not already inclined to take it, and I don't always agree with his reasoning myself (regardless of whether or not I agree or disagree with any conclusion he draws). In full disclosure, I only became aware of this book through Christopher Hitchens, whom I now know only quoted from the beginning chapters of this book. He certainly wasn't convinced, but that's to be expected. I'm glad to have read it for myself.
  • (5/5)
    favorite book
  • (4/5)
    In Mere Christianity, Lewis provides what you expect, an engaging apologetic written in a conversational tone that grows deeper the longer you ponder. The book is a journey more than anything else. First comes the understanding that there is a supernatural element to all that we know. To deny this would be self-refuting. Second, this supernatural element is most clearly explained and understood in light of the traditional Christian belief in monotheism. These two opening steps are probably the most powerful part of the work. Third, this monotheism produces an array of virtues in the lives of those who believe in it which gives credence to the power of the belief. At this point, Lewis begins making a case for the God of the Bible rather than a vague supernaturalism. Finally, he concludes with further reflection on the character of God, the nature of man, and the transformation that is possible. All of these point strongly to the existence of God.Lewis has the gift of presenting the profound in a way to be understood by the simple. Most of this book is clear, concise, and thought provoking. I think the author succeeds in his purpose.
  • (5/5)
    As someone newly interested in rediscovering the meaning behind Christianity, this book had a profound influence on me. Lewis gets to the bottom of things, and tells them for what they are. He does not paint Christianity in an easy light, nor should it be painted in such a way. Instead, he breaks it down using analogies and metaphors that make it easy for the non-Christian to understand, and difficult for the non-Christian to refute. As a Christian, it re-enforced my beliefs and renewed my understanding of what it means to be a Christian and life the Christian way of life as intended.
  • (4/5)
    Good thoughts, as always.
  • (5/5)
    A very persuasive book.
  • (3/5)
    Published in 1952, the book is based on a series of wartime radio broadcasts on Christianity. By "mere" Christianity Lewis means "common or central" Christianity. He says in his preface he made an effort to discuss those ideas that are without denomination, and he sent the second part, "What Christians Believe" to Anglican, Methodist, Presbyterian and Roman Catholic clergy asking for criticism to make sure he was right on the mark. He says he finds this particularly important in addressing his "unbelieving neighbors" and the book is an apologia, or argument for and defense of what he considers the Christian core beliefs--and as such particularly addressed as much or more to atheists as to believers. As an atheist myself who was raised as a Catholic, I can't say I find him convincing--or even enlightening about Christian belief.The work is divided into four books. The first, "Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe" is an argument for Natural Law ethics and for it as a proof of God's existence. Anyone who has taken an introduction to philosophy course knows there are three basic arguments for the existence of God: ontological (that by definition God must exist), cosmological (some great being must have created a universe) and teleological (a watch means there must be a watchmaker, a universe shows complexity and purpose that requires a designer). Lewis' argument is a variety of the teleological argument. All human beings have a common core morality. Such universality means a God must have designed it so. Moreover, it must be God's design, because we have no selfish interest in being moral. Lewis' argument from intelligent design is subject to all the refutations you can find in any philosophy text. As for morality being something inconvenient and not selfishly "good" for us--I'd dispute that. One commonplace of market and bargaining theory is this. If you're only going to deal with a person once, it's in your best interest to cheat them. But that's not how markets work. We all have to deal with the same people again and again, and it's in our best interest therefore to treat people fairly and honestly. And on a personal level, well think of Scrooge. Who was happier? The miserly Scrooge eating thin gruel and going "Bah, Humbug?" Or the reformed, generous and benevolent Scrooge who became a much loved family member and friend? Virtues aren't something inflicted upon us by authority. That doesn't mean they're easy to practice or don't call for discipline and short-term denial in exchange for long-term payoffs, any more than it's easy to follow a diet even though it might be best for our health. Arguably virtues are the habits of mind and action that best helps human beings to flourish. And that doesn't need a God. As Lewis admits, they're fairly universal and accessible to all.Even if you believe in God though, there's a huge gap between that belief and belief in the specific doctrines of Christianity. The second part "What Christians Believe" tries to jump that gap and can be summed up this way. Jesus claimed he could forgive the sins of others. Anyone claiming to do so if not God must be a "lunatic or fiend." The Jesus of the Gospels is neither lunatic or fiend, and therefore must be God. This begs the question. I actually don't think there's anything in the picture of Jesus in the Bible that proves that he wasn't delusional or (less likely in my opinion) claiming a connection with God he didn't have for personal ends. History is filled with would-be messiahs from Mohammed to Joseph Smith. There's no reason to believe Jesus or Mohammed or Joseph Smith has a special connection with God except the believer wills it so. And there's a third alternative. That Jesus was neither lunatic nor fiend but was misunderstood and misrepresented by the fallible men that wrote the works in the New Testament.And speaking of the New Testament, one problem I have with Mere Christianity is if you're going to lay out what it is Christians believe, I think you should carefully parse your sources. I can't recall Lewis ever quoting the Bible, and he definitely mixes things the are core Christianity with elaborations infused with Greek and Roman philosophy. I defy anyone to show me anywhere in the Bible that discusses the "cardinal virtues." These come from the Pagan Greek philosopher Plato's Republic and were adopted into the Christian tradition though theologians such as Augustine and Thomas Aquinas familiar with classical philosophy. I would have liked to know what came from what Jesus reportedly said, what came from other New Testament sources and what is simply received Christian tradition. I get Lewis' purpose in trying to argue from the ground up for Christianity for the ordinary person, and not wanting to load it up with a history lesson. But if the book doesn't work for me as a good argument for Christianity, it's also not in my opinion necessarily the best place to explore just what is Christianity. The third part "Christian Behavior" is where Lewis discusses those cardinal virtues, and the theological virtues (which come from Paul in the New Testament) and such issues as "Sexual Morality." I actually found that particular chapter fairly insightful and full of common sense. But as with the other talk of morality, where it makes sense, I don't think you need to bring in Christianity to argue for it, and when it doesn't make sense (such as Lewis' argument for the man being the head of the household in a marriage) it just focuses attention on a facet of Christianity which I don't think holds it up in an attractive light. For me, the last part, "Beyond Personality" about theology is about as meaningful as an argument about how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. For a Christian, Lewis' argument for the truth of the trinity may be profound. For me it was just... well nonsense. And non-sense. C.S. Lewis is a very lucid writer and his arguments thought-out and presented well if you accept certain assumptions. I can imagine for many readers he has a lot to offer, but I can't say this did much for my understanding of Christianity, and despite Lewis claiming he aimed it at least partly at nonbelievers, I think this might be more for those Christians who want to think about the fundamentals of their faith and what it demands from them.
  • (3/5)
    StArted reading this when my son went through CCD, but only sporadically. I like it for its historic value, but its arguments are too convoluted for me. Give me a straight up catechism if I am to accept organizes religion and all.
  • (4/5)
    We read this book as a small group, doing a few chapters at a time and discussing them together. It's led to some great, helpful and deep discussions.

    As the book progressed, I started to find his style a little tiresome. Reading the book over six or months may have had a part in that. Some of the analogies are excellent, others are not, but most are helpful.

    A good book to go through some of the basics of Christianity, though I think the book is incomplete on its own (people or other resources work well to fill in gaps). It is essential to remember the post-WWII context of the book.
  • (5/5)
    This is a really great book, even for those who are already Christian. The analogies Lewis has come up with are often very profound and immensely helpful. This book definitely changed my life.
  • (4/5)
    I absolutely loved this book! Before reading this I'd only read one other nonfiction book of his as well as the Chronicles of Narnia, so I was familiar with him. In this book, Lewis' tone is very conversational and down to earth, the result of part of the book being a transcription of a series of radio addresses Lewis was asked to give in the midst of the disillusion and horror of WWII. I found myself laughing often and really enjoying how simply he states some of the most profound truths of the universe. I was also challenged to open myself even more to the work that the Lord wants to do in my life, even when that means growing pains. Overall I would say that this book serves as a gentle reminder to Believers and as a simple challenge to those that are seeking. This is probably a book that I will read again, and I'll give it more attention than I was able to this time.
  • (3/5)
    I found this to be a book of two halves. The first half contains a section on how the existence of God is shown through conscience, and a section on what Christians believe. I found this very good, and would rate it at 4 stars. The second half contains a section on morality and one on theology. I found this not so good, and would rate it at two stars.
  • (5/5)
    Classic expose on Christianity. C.S. Lewis is the intellectual, thinking man's author for the defense and explanation of the Christian faith. Must read.
  • (5/5)
    An excellent book which builds brick upon brick to explain the Christian faith and why we believe as we do. Fabulous, even the third time through...and it may take you that many times to begin to follow C.S. Lewis' logic.
  • (4/5)
    I had read this many years ago and seem to have internalized many of the main points. While each chapter follows flawless logic, the book as a whole (since it was cobbled together from radio talks etc) is not quite so coherent. Lewis is excellent on divorce, how much is expected from those blessed with "niceness", those who follow other religions and pretty dreadful on women (bless him!)I enjoy his brisk, uncompromising tone and wish I had had tutorials with him.
  • (5/5)
    Great book! Will be re-read many times over.
  • (4/5)
    A Christian classic based on speeches given during WW2. This is a defence of the core Christian beliefs, those common to most denominations, argued more through logic than theology. His astute observations have hardly dated at all in the 60 years since publication. While I disagreed with some of his ideas, the book is full of nuggets of wisdom. Which is why I found it all the more surprising that it was such a hard slog to read. Perhaps for me it just didn't have enough depth on many of the issues raised. It felt that just as we got to the interesting bits, that would be the end of the chapter, on to another subject. I would recommend it as a good introduction to the debate rather than a thorough investigation.
  • (4/5)
    CS Lewis writes this tiny book for the average Christians who want to feel reconnected to their faith. It's quite conversational - parts of it were done as a radio broadcast before they were a part of this book. It's also a solid foundation upon which to build and encourage belief, devoted both to faith in Christ and daily Christian living. It doesn't seem like much of a book when you first pick it up, but it ends up covering a lot of ground quite approachably.
  • (5/5)
    Sometimes faith needs a little logic. Here you can find some. And, as a bonus, what great history. Think about hearing this on the radio during a most fearful period.
  • (3/5)
    With this introduction to Christianity, Lewis proves he is one of the greatest Christian writers, and Mere Christianity rightly takes its place as one of the most accessible works both by Lewis and on Christianity. Though not by any means an apologia for Christianity, it reminds its readers of the truly important matters of faith and makes often complex theology attractive and exciting. An essential book for any Christian on any stage of their journey in faith, and for those too who are sincerely inquisitive about the claims of Christianity.
  • (4/5)
    To begin with, I have to say outright that I admire C.S. Lewis. I enjoy his writing. I think his scholarly work was brilliant and I adore his fiction. I also think that his writings as a Christian apologist are in some ways the most difficult to place in his oeuvre, and it is these works that people, at least people I know, either tend to love or hate.I enjoyed Mere Christianity. I had read it before. If you are expecting sophisticated theology, or an intellectual defense of Christianity, this is not the book for you. It does not have the rigor of his academic works and I do not believe this was ever Lewis' intention. The book remains popular because it is a clear explanation of "mere" Christianity, as I believe Lewis understood it as a "mere" man. It reads like a series of brief chats. In fact I think the book was conceived as a series of talks to be given on the radio and expanded from that. The talks are meant to be simple. They succeed because I think they address many issues experienced by real people who are Christians or are struggling with Christianity. I think if one is struggling with the meaning of life or with how to live a good life and is open to the emotional sides of life aside from just the intellectual, there are parts of this book that are bound to resonate. This is one of the reasons for its continued success. Theologically, Lewis may not always pull off his explanations, he might not even explain something in a way that has since become accepted, but I feel he carries this off as he explains it as the current state of his own evolving understanding.That said, much that is said is dated, is written for a different time and world-view. This might be difficult for some people, although the fundamental principles remain the same several generations later. And as usual, Lewis makes me think, and reevaluate, both when I agree with him and when I don't.
  • (5/5)
    Where do I even start. I haven't read any of Lewis' non-fiction before though I've wanted to for ages. I'm so glad I chose this as my first one. Basically I don't have the words to do the book justice. It is terribly profound. It is logical and oh, so simply deep. At first I found the writing as if I was being talked to like a child but I did have to realise the book was first written in the 1940s and I got used to the style along with realizing that I am a child, a child of God. As I said I do not have the words to do the book justice and that is how I felt throughout reading the whole book. His explanations of why there must be a God ... the God ... Our Father, are so simplistically logical that I was literally stunned and wished I could have thought of that myself. He goes on to describe the whole Christian religion, from the standpoint of an atheist who converted because it was the only sensible answer to his searching. As a Christian, Catholic, myself I didn't need the proof but I found it utterly enlightening the way he explained things so simply. He covers all the points most non-believers raise as he raised them himself on his journey and C.S. Lewis was one of our great modern thinkers. I could have read this book quickly but it took me a while to read as after I had read 1, sometimes 2, chapters I just had to stop because I wanted to remember, muse upon and discuss the next day with my coffee group, the way he had made me look at things from a different angle. This is "the" book to read for those looking, searching and trying to find God, even before you decide upon a denomination. Lewis even talks about this. The book is completely Christian without denominational influence. He was Church of England (Anglican/Episcopal) but he talks of how one should find their own denomination without bias. Now that I've read the book, this is one I'm going to keep by my bedside and read a chapter from now and then to learn his phraseology and allegory to help myself when speaking with non-believers. Truly a classic of the 20th century that should be read by all because even if the book doesn't convert you it will give you the true meaning of Christianity and let you know why these Christians you meet aren't perfect.
  • (5/5)
    One of the most "resonating" books I have ever read.
  • (5/5)
    The most amazing apologetic work I've ever read! C.S. Lewis is one of those authors who has truly mastered the art of the written word. With a pragmatic touch and an astounding ability to create clear and beautiful images from nothing, Lewis's written version of his radio broadcasts captures the true essence of Christianity in a way that few others have ever managed. Truly inspiring!
  • (5/5)
    As a young child I fell in love with C.S. Lewis. As an adult, I stumbled upon Mere Christianity. It is a beautiful, but tough read. I was able to re-evaluate my own understandings of faith and belief through the words of someone that had experienced the same doubts about religion. It addresses some the 'basic' principles of Christianity, such as morality.