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Flesh House: The Case Was Closed Until The Killer Walked Free...

Flesh House: The Case Was Closed Until The Killer Walked Free...

Written by Stuart MacBride

Narrated by Steve Worsley


Flesh House: The Case Was Closed Until The Killer Walked Free...

Written by Stuart MacBride

Narrated by Steve Worsley

ratings:
4.5/5 (18 ratings)
Length:
12 hours
Released:
Sep 7, 2017
ISBN:
9780008260385
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The 4th thriller in the Number One bestselling crime series from the award-winning Stuart MacBride. Panic grips The Granite City as DS Logan McRae heads up a manhunt for ‘The Flesher’ – one of the UK’s most notorious serial killers.

Panic strikes the Granite City

When an offshore container turns up at Aberdeen Harbour full of human meat, it kicks off the largest manhunt in the Granite City’s history.

Twenty years ago The Flesher’ was butchering people all over the UK turning victims into oven-ready joints until Grampian’s finest put him away. But eleven years later he was out on appeal. Now he’s missing and people are dying again.

When members of the original investigation start to disappear, Detective Sergeant Logan McRae realizes the case might not be as clear cut as everyone thinks

Twenty years of secrets and lies are being dragged into the light. And the only thing that’s certain is Aberdeen will never be the same again.
Released:
Sep 7, 2017
ISBN:
9780008260385
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Stuart MacBride is the Sunday Times No. 1 bestselling author of the Logan McRae and Ash Henderson novels. His work has won several prizes and in 2015 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by Dundee University. Stuart lives in the north-east of Scotland with his wife Fiona, cats Grendel, Onion and Beetroot, and other assorted animals.


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Reviews

What people think about Flesh House

4.3
18 ratings / 18 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Stuart MacBride dissects the human condition, literally.
    It's horrible. And brilliant. It has an appalling ending. And it's brilliant.
  • (5/5)
    First Line: "No, you listen to me: if my six-year-old son isn't back here in ten minutes I'm going to come round there and rip you a new arsehole, are we clear?"When the newest Stuart MacBride mystery arrives here at Casa Kittling, I feel as though Fort Knox has just delivered another gold bar. Yes, I love these books, but if a blend of (often) black humor and very gruesome scenes aren't your thing, save yourself some time and skip this review.Detective Sergeant Logan McRae works the mean streets of Aberdeen, Scotland, and he'd probably tell you that police headquarters is often more dire than the streets. He has a strong sense of right and wrong, a strong sense of duty, and he often has brilliant flashes of intuition. He is also a piece of taffy pulled between two of the most obnoxious detective inspectors you'll ever find in crime fiction-- and they both have death grips on him. If I were McRae, sooner or later I'd snap and wear my "Some Mornings It's Not Worth Chewing Through the Restraints" t-shirt to work where I'd tell both inspectors exactly what I thought of them as I turned in my warrant card.Twenty years ago "The Flesher" was butchering people all over the UK until the Grampian Police put him in prison. It's eleven years later, he's out on appeal, and now he's missing and people are being turned into oven-ready joints again. When members of the original investigation team begin disappearing, McRae realizes that the case might not be as clear cut as everyone else seems to think.Flesh House begins slowly and continues to build-- typical MacBride. Most of the humor is in the first half of the book. I've begun to think of this as a diversionary tactic. MacBride wants you to keep laughing while he moves his chess pieces into position all over the board. Hopefully by the time you wipe the tears from your eyes and calm down, his trap is set and you don't have a prayer of escape. Me? I'm a sheep to the slaughter when it comes to this particular crime fiction writer. He can be hilarious. I'll give you a few examples. You'll either agree that he's brilliant, or you'll look at both of us as if we forgot to don our strait jackets this morning... "Logan had met their state-of-the-art security system-- it was a sixty-eight-year-old man called Harold. Logan had sneezed more alert things than him." "Which sounded incredibly unlikely to Logan: Insch wouldn't ask for help if his crotch was on fire. From the look on her face, Isobel didn't believe it either." "As Logan watched, Detective Constable Simon Rennie boogied his way past them, doing a pretty good impersonation of an octopus being electrocuted."This is MacBride's most complex mystery yet, and since cannibalism is one of the strong themes running throughout the book, I'm wondering how many fans he lost with Flesh House . He definitely doesn't sugar coat the theme. (I have a very high tolerance of such things, and it even bothered me a time or two.) But I kept reading because I love his writing and I love the character of Logan McRae. The slapstick, the underlying seriousness, the gruesome scenes are all woven into stories that I can't resist. A carrot was dangled in front of McRae in this book, and it seems to have changed his way of thinking a bit. All the threads weren't tied off neatly at the end, so I'm just going to have to see what happens in the next book.I can't wait.
  • (5/5)
    The fourth in the series and it just gets better! The crime scenes are incredibly vivid, better than CSI could ever do. The mystery comes together at the end, the 'Flesher' is identified, but a few loose ends are left, leaving more than enough room for several more books to clean everything up.
  • (4/5)
    Serial killer and cannibal "The Flesher" seems to be back after a 20 year hiatus and DS Logan McRae needs to put a stop to the killings so not more human flesh reaches the butcher shops. McRae is such a great character; he's just a regular detective who makes errors and draws erroneous conclusions and gets bollocked for it and then eventually works it out and solves the mystery organically, rather than having some sort of extrasensory sixth sense that many literary detectives have. Heads-up that this is a properly gruesome installment in the series and the descriptions of the murders and the other "nasty events" (so called to avoid spoilers) are extremely gory, so no snacking while reading, not even a bacon buttie!
  • (4/5)
    I didn't like this one as much as the others. Partly I didn't much like the format of having a BBC camera man following them around filming. But mostly the ending left me feeling unsettled and irritated.
  • (4/5)
    Do not read this over dinner!Fourth of a series, and I would recommend having read the previous books although probably not strictly necessary, the case stands on it's own and only a few of the personal references are carried through. Continued grimness in Aberdeen as DC Logan McRae finds himself involved in a re-opened cannibal case. When human remain are found in a container heading out to the oil-rigs it quickly becomes apparent that somehow a killer has had access to an abitoir. They do have an obvious suspect as a cannibal had been active in Aberdeen a few years before, and so all these connections are investiaged. Meanwhile the carnage continues, and the police are very much in a reactive response mode until Logan makes a few guesses. Not all of these pan out, but eventually he deuces the correct solution - a bit late for several of the victims. Meanwhile there are various distractions going on. He's broken up with Jackie, owing to incidents in the previous book and her secondment ot Strathclyde, but his sidekick has found a glorious blond, which doesn't help. Meanwhile the overweight Inspector Inch's diet is causing him to be even more irritable than usual, but Inspector Steel's forthcoming wedding has tempered her nature to only slightly grumpy. The previous inspector now a Chief Constable from Birmingham is also recalled to the case, and doesn't quite turn out like Logan expected. Finally Srathcylde (and Jackie) get called in to oversee the investigation as the Aberdeen force don't seem to be making enought progress for the media. This adds a few more layers of tension.While perhaps not quite so explicitily gruesome as a couple of the earlier books, there is a lot of gore, and the cannibal scenes are enough to put many off their dinner. Also interspersed in the text are montages of Newspaper articles created for the story, these work surprisingly well. The investigation proceeds intelligenjntly enough, with a few obvious dead ends explored, and red herrings exposed. These are all tidied up during the book and only one plothole left exposed. The switches in viewpoint to that of the captives and criminal are probably not necessary - they serve to distract from the investigation. However the banter between the officers and the interplay of their social lives is particularly well dones, and helps to create the impression of a team doing the best they can. For no explicable reason this case is being filmed by the BBC so we have many interruptions and discussions with the BBC camera team. These don't add anything to the story except wordcount.A good continuation of the series, and I was pleased to see that my guess of Logan being offered a promotion was correct.
  • (4/5)
    Fast-paced, people-eating, pretty gruesome crime thriller. There are a lot of parts where you cringe. The ending was a little disappointing but if you can get over that and the gruesomeness, go for it!

    Also, I got duped into the middle of some sort of series again. This time I actually want to read what came before and will come after:-)
  • (3/5)
    Pardon the pun, but this book is a bit disjointed.I've read the previous books in the series and this is by far the odd one out. I found it difficult to get into as the writing style was different, in a confusing way, and I didn't like that. It's not the typical crime novel with characters and situations that I just didn't like. I got tired of the victims in this book and at times wished they were just killed. Plus there were so many questions unanswered, almost as if it is setting up for another book.

    That said, it's worth a read though, if only to complete the series. I do like the main characters in this book and that is what drew me to the series. They still shine in this book.

    This was an ebook and it would have to be one of the worst formatted ebooks I've ever read. I see more errors in the formatting of ebooks than I do in a paper books.
  • (4/5)
    Another excellent MacBride.
  • (4/5)
    My introduction to Macbride was Dark Blood and I was enjoying that so much that before I even finished it I popped into my local discount bookshop just on the offchance and sure enough, there it was, Flesh House. There is a mention in Dark Blood of Logan having eaten human flesh so when I saw this book featured cannibalism I knew what to expect!Like the other book, this story also concerns a man who was found guilty, imprisoned and released: The Flesher abducted and later ate his victims, and the readers are presented with several points of view - that of the victims, of the killer and of the investigating officer Logan McRae who works not only with the foul-mouthed chain-smoking lesbian DT Steel but also DI Insch.It is humorous, suspenseful and rather gory - although why [as I have read] some readers have been reduced to nightmares and bouts of bed-wetting is beyond me. They should have stuck to James patterson. A wonderful, edge of your seat read, as well written as it is exciting.
  • (2/5)
    an unevenly paced book, and overly long. but with a couple of plot twists that will keep you reading, to an ending that I found unsatisfactory.
  • (3/5)
    Too bloody meatyA repetition of the description of an abattoir chapter after chapter,Not as creative as his other books, but surely stomach turning
  • (5/5)
    I really like this series, it has great characters, lots of hilarious banter and vivid descriptions. So far all of the Logan Macrae books have tons of suspense and unexpected plot twists, most especially in this book, Flesh House! It’s my favorite story by far, but even with the humor it was definitely deeper and darker that the previous books, and the plot twists get really wild. It was very intense, if you don’t care for books full of blood, sweat and tears, you may not care for it. Personally I think it was excellent!
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I think this one is the best one of MacBride's. I could not put it down, I had dreams about the flesher. Great characters and dialogues (I just love DI Steel).

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    MacBride's fourth novel to feature DS Logan McRae proves particularly gory as the principal case challenging Aberdeen's CID is that of a serial killer with cannibalistic traits, killing and eatin his way through the fringes of the city. Once again, the dishevelled foul-mouthed lesbian, DI Steel, steals the show with her unfailing ability to offer up the most inappropriate comments imaginable at every new situation. I had read this novel before, immediately after its original publication, but still found it completely gripping the second time around.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Riveting and gruesome, Flesh House is the fourth in the Logan McRae series by Stuart MacBride. This book requires a strong stomach and a extremely dark sense of humor. Luckily I seem to possess both. I have loved this series from the get-go and my admiration just keeps growing. For me this book is an example of near perfection in a Police Procedural, and certainly deserves a 5 star rating in my library.Twenty years ago, “The Flesher” was on a reign of terror before he was caught and imprisoned. Now he has been released, and within months the city of Aberdeen is once again gripped by macabre fear as human flesh is discovered in the food chain, and people are once again disappearing. We follow Logan McRae and his team, including both his strange and wacky bosses, DIs Insch and Steel as they try to solve this horrendous case. Even though Flesh House deals with such dark subject matter as serial murder and cannibalism, I found myself at times laughing out loud, while at others, I definitely cringed. Remember, I warned you, this is a very explicit book and with this author nothing is sacred. But if you have the stomach for it, this is a brilliant read.
  • (3/5)
    Flesh House is the fourth in Stuart MacBride's series of gritty crime novels featuring Logan MacRae, set in dark and brooding Aberdeen. Logan and crew are called out to Aberdeen's dockside where someone has noticed a leaking ship container. When they find a piece of meat with a nipple ring, further investigation turns up more even more human meat. The vivid visuals and disgusting descriptions make for a stomach churning journey that is more horror story than crime novel.

    The police believe that a serial killer named “The Flesher” has returned after twenty years. A butcher named Ken Wiseman was convicted of the original slayings but was released on appeal. Now he's in the spotlight again. Complicating all this is a producer from a BBC reality show following the Grampian Police around. And as usual, MacRae and company stumble around like idiots. One of the interesting and different aspects of this book is the focus on Heather, a victim being kept alive by The Flesher. It adds a new perspective of terror to the story. The things we learn from her are equal parts riveting, horrifying and sickening.

    I really liked the first two Logan MacRae mysteries but this has been my least favorite of the four I've now read. There is so much padding and the plot becomes clogged up with over-the-top antics of the closest thing Scotland has to the Keystone Kops. Flesh House was very dark and very graphic in terms of the nature of the grim murders and the subject of cannibalism. I'm going to give MacBride one more chance in book five of the series, Blind Eye.
  • (3/5)
    I have been enjoying this Logan MacRae series but the incompetence and management of this police department in over the top and unbelievable. This series definitely needs more redeemable characters. The plot was a great one that should have be cleverly executed but fell far short of its potential. The ending was very unsatisfying as it left us hanging in regards to the conditions of some characters. I would like to continue the series but I'm afraid to pick up the next book and once again find it another disappointment.