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1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Disorder

1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Disorder

Written by Arthur Herman

Narrated by Stefan Rudnicki


1917: Lenin, Wilson, and the Birth of the New World Disorder

Written by Arthur Herman

Narrated by Stefan Rudnicki

ratings:
4.5/5 (46 ratings)
Length:
16 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 28, 2017
ISBN:
9780062791467
Format:
Audiobook

Description

This is the story of two men, and the two decisions, that transformed world history in a single tumultuous year, 1917: Wilson's entry into World War One and Lenin's Bolshevik Revolution.

In April 1917 Woodrow Wilson, champion of American democracy but also segregation; advocate for free trade and a new world order based on freedom and justice; thrust the United States into World War One in order to make the "world safe for democracy"—only to see his dreams for a liberal international system dissolve into chaos, bloodshed, and betrayal.

That October Vladimir Lenin, communist revolutionary and advocate for class war and "dictatorship of the proletariat," would overthrow Russia's earlier democratic revolution that had toppled the all-power Czar, all in the name of liberating humanity—and instead would set up the most repressive totalitarian regime in history, the Soviet Union.

In this incisive, fast-paced history, New York Times bestselling author Arthur Herman brilliantly reveals how Lenin and Wilson rewrote the rules of modern geopolitics. Through the end of World War I, countries only marched into war to increase or protect their national interests. After World War I, countries began going to war over ideas.  Together Lenin and Wilson unleashed the disruptive ideologies that would sweep the world, from nationalism and globalism to Communism and terrorism, and that continue to shape our world today.

Our New World Disorder is the legacy left by Wilson and Lenin, and their visions of the perfectibility of man. One hundred years later, we still sit on the powder keg they first set the detonator to, through war and revolution.

Publisher:
Released:
Nov 28, 2017
ISBN:
9780062791467
Format:
Audiobook


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4.5
46 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Easy to follow, well-concieved, interesting topic. Not indepth on either man, but a good overview. Author had unmasked political leanings that I feel colored his treatment of topics that might be better seen through the eyes of a more politically-disinterested, historically-motivated author. But still enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    Great reader. The main thing the book did for me was to skillfully connect some dots in my head. From recent previous readings, I understood that what horrible damage Wilson did as “ President” as he declared his dead baby( the League) as living while he was actually dying. What, on earth, was his “ good Dr Grayson, thinking? Lodge was more masterful at his craft, even without TR, than I ever imagined.
    This week in “ real time” we are facing some political games of similar nature. Whether the truth will prevail is doubtful.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed listening to this book. Great behind the scenes information into world war 1 and how leaders made their decisions.
  • (4/5)
    Whatever minute admiration I had for Woodrow Wilson has been erased by Mr. Herman's account of 1917, and it brings into sharper focus the danger we face today with leaders who are equally as arrogant as Wilson and like Lenin seem immune to human suffering.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    A thoroughly neocon take on the Wilsonian Idealist era and the Life of Vladimir Lenin, however I feel that the authors subjects don’t nearly connect as much as they aught to have or at least could have in the body of the text itself.

    For the next generation of Neoconservative apparatchiks, or those that want to study them, this is not a pointless volume to read or listen too, it informs more on the course of polemical history which grows out of works that tower over this one, namely Pipes, Service, Baker and Link. But to understand what sort of history the liberal right in America would want to write after its disastrous 3 decades at the helm of foreign policy leadership following the Cold War, look no further.

    If you are, however, looking for the details of Allied Intervention in Russia’s Civil War and Revolution, or to understand the complexity of the foreign entanglements and disentanglements of the Entente and the February Revolution to the collapse of the Far Eastern Republic, this is sadly not the volume for it.

    I got more entertainment for the liberal right historian milling over Wilson and his place in American history, condemning the area’s Wilson is to the right of him on (namely racialism) while trying to tie together the lose ends of the hostility towards the Idealism which was genesis of American involvement in global geopolitics with the complaints of realism with the slippery implications that the US must be a key player and arbiter in power dynamics of the other hemispheres. Whether or not Mr. Herman makes the case will depend, frankly, on your attitude to the Bush administration in hindsight.

    As it stands I see this volume as more of a case study on the prognosis to world problems articulated by the most gifted of the educated Neoconservative elites using historical polemics to create a partisan historiography than a conclusive look at either men or their time through a dispassionate lense even if still through a modern conservative view.

    1 person found this helpful