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Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

Written by Roxane Gay


Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

Written by Roxane Gay

ratings:
4.5/5 (283 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 1, 2018
ISBN:
9780062848703
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Editor's Note

#MeToo…

Been second-guessed or gaslit for speaking up? You’re not alone. These stirring essays edited by Roxane Gay are a rallying cry for change. Our pervasive cultural attitude that sexual harassment and violence is “not that bad” is just not good enough.

Description

Edited and with an introduction by Roxane Gay, the New York Times bestselling and deeply beloved author of Bad Feminist and Hunger, this anthology of first-person essays tackles rape, assault, and harassment head-on.

In this valuable and revealing anthology, cultural critic and best-selling author Roxane Gay collects original and previously published pieces that address what it means to live in a world where women have to measure the harassment, violence, and aggression they face, and where they are "routinely second-guessed, blown off, discredited, denigrated, besmirched, belittled, patronized, mocked, shamed, gaslit, insulted, bullied" for speaking out. Contributions include essays from established and up-and-coming writers, performers, and critics, including actors Ally Sheedy and Gabrielle Union and writers Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz, and Claire Schwartz.

Covering a wide range of topics and experiences, from an exploration of the rape epidemic embedded in the refugee crisis to first-person accounts of child molestation, this collection is often deeply personal and is always unflinchingly honest. Like Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to MeNot That Bad will resonate with every listener, saying "something in totality that we cannot say alone."

Searing and heartbreakingly candid, this provocative collection both reflects the world we live in and offers a call to arms insisting that "not that bad" must no longer be good enough.

Narrators include: Roxane Gay, Gabrielle Union, Ally Sheedy, Amy Jo Burns, Lyz Lenz, Claire Schwartz, Aubrey Hirsch, Jill Christman, Lynn Melnick, Brandon Taylor, Emma Smith-Stevens, A.J. McKenna, Lisa Mecham, Vanessa Mártir, xTx, Sophie Mayer, Nora Salem, V.L. Seek, Michelle Chen, Liz Rosema, Anthony Frame, Samhita Mukhopadhyay, Miriam Zoila Pérez, Zoe Medeiros, Sharisse Tracey, Stacey May Fowles, Elisabeth Fairfield Stokes, Meredith Talusan, Nicole Boyce, and Elissa Bassist.

Publisher:
Released:
May 1, 2018
ISBN:
9780062848703
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Roxane Gay is the author of the essay collection Bad Feminist, which was a New York Times bestseller; the novel An Untamed State, a finalist for the Dayton Peace Prize; the memoir Hunger, which was a New York Times bestseller and received a National Book Critics Circle citation; and the short story collections Difficult Women and Ayiti. A contributing opinion writer to the New York Times, she has also written for Time, McSweeney’s, the Virginia Quarterly Review, the Los Angeles Times, The Nation, The Rumpus, Bookforum, and Salon. Her fiction has also been selected for The Best American Short Stories 2012, The Best American Mystery Stories 2014, and other anthologies. She is the author of World of Wakanda for Marvel. She lives in Lafayette, Indiana, and sometimes Los Angeles.



Reviews

What people think about Not That Bad

4.5
283 ratings / 17 Reviews
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Critic reviews

  • Been second-guessed or gaslit for speaking up? You're not alone. These stirring essays about rape culture edited by Roxane Gay are a rallying cry for change. Our pervasive cultural attitude that sexual harassment and violence is "not that bad" is just not good enough.

    Scribd Editors
  • The women accusing Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct face a backlash common against victims of sexual assault who speak up: attacks on their credibility. They are not alone. These stirring essays edited by Roxane Gay demonstrate our pervasive cultural attitude that sexual harassment and violence is "not that bad" is just not good enough. A powerful rallying cry for change.

    Scribd Editors

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    What made this book so great is also what made it feel like a chore - these stories sound all too similar and familiar...
  • (4/5)
    Content Note: This book’s subtitle is literally “Dispatches from Rape Culture.”Best for: Those looking for some reassurance and reminders that yes, it really is that bad.In a nutshell: Editor Roxane Gay brings together essays from 30 people (mostly women), all of which address some part of rape culture.Worth quoting:“The part I wanted them to understand is that these equations can implode, constricting your whole life, until one day you’re sitting in a locked steel box breathing through an airhole with a straw and wondering, Now? Now am I safe?”“I wonder if, when it finally stops for good, if it will be too late to relax, if the muscle memory of the harassment will keep me tense on the sidewalk forever.”“Then they will revise backward. They will take every opinion they’ve ever heard from you, every personality train, every action, and recast them in light of what you told them. This will be particularly true of your sexual behavior and your appearance.”Why I chose it:Roxane Gay.Review:I am a writer. I mean, I don’t get paid to write, but I do write. A lot. And I have this essay, still sitting in the ‘ready to pitch’ folder in Scrivener, simply called “Arm Grab,” about the time a random dude grabbed and squeezed my arm and then ran off, and what multiple encounters like that do a person over time. And before reading this book, I probably would have left it in the folder forever because it is just one in a long line of small incidents that I would have described as “not that bad.”This is a book that can be hard to read. It isn’t 30 essays about rape, though — it’s 30 essays about the various ways that rape culture affects women and men. About street harassment, and child abuse, and date rape. Individual stories that are connected by the ways we don’t believe women, or treat them as broken, or at fault, or as liars. The ways we’re taught to be grateful that our experiences don’t matter, don’t affect the ways we navigate this world.The essay that resonated the most with me was “Getting Home,” where author Nicole Boyce talks about how an experience led to her not feeling comfortable walking alone after dark. Like ever. And so much of what she wrote lives in my head. The fear of the sound behind me when I leave the tube station. The keys sticking out through our fingers. My confusion and then sadness when my husband and I go for a walk late in the evening and I don’t want to walk through the park because I wouldn’t do it alone, and I remember that he navigates the world without really having to make those calculations.I’d recommend this to everyone who feels that they’re in a place where they could read it. It’s not light reading, but it wasn’t nearly as challenging a read as I thought it would be.
  • (5/5)
    This book is the best essay collection that I’ve ever read.
  • (4/5)
    This application is very useful for me i like it
  • (4/5)
    Not bad. I like the story. Thought I felt sometimes I could not relate to some essays point of view.
  • (5/5)
    I can’t write in words what this book has meant to me.