Enjoy millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more, with a free trial

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

The Picture of Dorian Gray: Classic Tales Edition
The Picture of Dorian Gray: Classic Tales Edition
The Picture of Dorian Gray: Classic Tales Edition
Audiobook8 hours

The Picture of Dorian Gray: Classic Tales Edition

Written by Oscar Wilde

Narrated by B.J. Harrison

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

3/5

()

About this audiobook

Dorian Gray embodies every artistic element for artist, Basil Hallward. But when Lord Henry reveals the phenomenal world experienced only to the young and beautiful, Dorian makes a devious deal.

Thus begins Dorian Gray's extensive journey into dissipation, while somehow maintaining every element of his youth and innocence. What is his secret? And why does he keep Basil Hallward's painting hidden from prying eyes?

LanguageEnglish
Release dateFeb 12, 2014
ISBN9781937091989
The Picture of Dorian Gray: Classic Tales Edition
Author

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. His novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, and stage comedies Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband, and The Importance of Being Earnest, established his reputation. In 1895, following his libel action against the Marquess of Queensberry, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment for homosexual conduct, as a result of which he wrote "The Ballad of Reading Gaol," and his epistolary essay De Profundis. On his release from prison in 1897 he lived in obscurity in Europe, and died in Paris in 1900.

Related to The Picture of Dorian Gray

Related audiobooks

Related articles

Reviews for The Picture of Dorian Gray

Rating: 3.060002177937493 out of 5 stars
3/5

9,183 ratings271 reviews

What did you think?

Tap to rate

Review must be at least 10 words

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    I was really surprised by this book. It was better than I thought it would be I really enjoyed it.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    People get older and lose their looks. Don't whine about it. Moral of the story.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Waited a long time to read this book. Glad I did.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    A brilliantly written novel enclosing important life lessons. A bit dragged out towards the end though.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    exellent timeless classic...!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    A fascinating study of beauty gone evil.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    I think Oscar Wilde was a genius, but some of his passages were too weighty for me.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    A fantastic plot buried under too many words (mostly coming from the mouth of Lord Henry). It would have made a gripping and terrifying novella or short story. To alter an accusation from Dorian and turn it back on Wilde, "You would sacrifice any reader, Oscar, for the sake of an epigram."
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    I have read this book 3 times. Every time I swear that I didn't read it - I just remember the synopsis - and then I get halfway through and realize I'm rereading it.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    There's something in nineteenth-century British literature that I am drawn to—there is a certain musicality or lyricism to it that I love, despite its inspirations often being delusional, fantastical and at times even fetishistic. So it is of little surprise that I found The Picture of Dorian Gray a sweeping read, and one that I had little dissatisfactions with, stylistically.When painter Basil Hallward first sets his eyes upon Dorian Gray, he is a young, captivating soul of speechless beauty. Combined with his social standing, his allure sets his name aflame across countless of social spheres within England. The story begins when Basil makes Dorian his muse, and asks him to sit for a portrait that, little do they both know, will become much more than the painter's magnum opus. Lord Henry, a wealthy friend of Basil, quickly enters the scene, instilling in the Adonis a roaring, dizzying passion for life: “the few words that Basil’s friend had said to him…had touched some secret chord that had never been touched before, but that he felt now was vibrating and throbbing to curious pulses” (21). It is the whimsical, at times paradoxical musings of Lord Henry that transform Dorian Gray, whose adoration for his own portrait become the root of the story’s unfoldment.This was my first proper exposure to Wilde’s work, and it surely was a pleasant experience. I do not know the reason as to why this was his only novel, but it certainly encapsulates his interest in the Aesthetic Movement (“Art for Art’s Sake”). Filled with a rather spiritualistic love for art, humor, and thrill it makes for a lovely (and easy) read, though it lacks the depth, the grittiness, that I was looking for. But this may very well be as a consequence of its loyalty to the values of Wilde’s movement, where art existed free of social, moral and even logical obligations. This novel lacks substance or a core, but ultimately our own conclusions, our own thoughts emerge out of it to ap