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I Know You Know: A Novel

I Know You Know: A Novel


I Know You Know: A Novel

ratings:
4/5 (87 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 18, 2018
ISBN:
9780062867049
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

From New York Times bestselling author Gilly Macmillan comes this original, chilling and twisty mystery about two shocking murder cases twenty years apart, and the threads that bind them.

Twenty years ago, eleven-year-olds Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby were murdered in the city of Bristol, their bodies dumped near a dog racing track. A man was convicted of the brutal crime, but decades later, questions still linger.

For his whole life, filmmaker Cody Swift has been haunted by the deaths of his childhood best friends. The loose ends of the police investigation consume him so much that he decides to return to Bristol in search of answers. Hoping to uncover new evidence, and to encourage those who may be keeping long-buried secrets to speak up, Cody starts a podcast to record his findings. But there are many people who don't want the case—along with old wounds—reopened so many years after the tragedy, especially Charlie's mother, Jess, who decides to take matters into her own hands.

When a long-dead body is found in the same location the boys were left decades before, the disturbing discovery launches another murder investigation. Now Detective John Fletcher, the investigator on the original case, must reopen his dusty files and decide if the two murders are linked. With his career at risk, the clock is ticking and lives are in jeopardy…

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 18, 2018
ISBN:
9780062867049
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Gilly Macmillan is the internationally bestselling author of What She Knew, The Perfect Girl, Odd Child Out, I Know You Know, The Nanny, and To Tell You the Truth. She resides in Bristol, England.

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Reviews

What people think about I Know You Know

3.8
87 ratings / 17 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for a review.I found this book to be very refreshing. It was the perfect combination of thriller and detective novel. I really enjoyed the podcast element too. It added a fresh take on the typical mystery thriller. I will say that I disliked the italics sections as a way to distinguish between timelines. I understand the purpose but reading several pages of just italics was daunting at times. Other than that, I really enjoyed this book!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book. This story is told in 2 different timelines. One is modern day, and the other is 1996. In 1996, two boys were murdered, the storyline goes through the "investigation". Fast forward 20 years and the same two detectives are trying to solve a murder that appears to have also happened 20 years ago. In the meantime, a podcast has been started, investigating the crime of the two murdered boys. Sounds a bit confusing, but this book was put together nicely. I was not lost reading this. I felt the storyline flowed. I did not like Detective Fletcher. He seemed to be doing anything to get ahead, to make a name for himself and to go around the rules. That did not change throughout the entire book. That been said, I did like the other characters. Jess, Jessy or Jessica (depending on the timeline) really grew up. A single teenage mother who wanted affection and to party, until her son was killed. Now she is married with a teenage daughter, and will do what she can to protect her. I was satisfied with the ending. No, it wasn't wrapped up in a neat little now, but it left a bit to the imagination.
  • (3/5)
    It was just okay for me. Not good, not great. I loved Perfect Girl, this one wasn’t near as good for me. The storyline was good, the execution not so much. And the ending was really weak. Characters were all pretty much unlikable and not a lot of development for me there. This Is a 2 1/2 for me.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting read with multiple POV, and layered characters. The ending and resolution felt a bit rushed.
  • (3/5)
    This was the tale of the background of the murder of two small boys that involved a new look twenty years later after another body was found nearby. While there were some interesting characters the action was very slow moving. I liked the use of a podcast as part of the unveiling of the facts behind these cases, but the cases themselves were less satisfying.
  • (5/5)
    I KNOW YOU KNOW is a very compelling read. Props to Gilly Macmilian on producing a fascinating mystery.
  • (3/5)
    Twenty years ago, 11-year-olds Charlie & Scott were murdered. A neighbor of theirs, a mentally challenged young man, was charged & sent to prison for the crime. Cody Swift was best friends with the victims, and by a stroke of luck, was not with them at the time of the murders. Now as an adult and emerging filmmaker, he is haunted by the murders and is not convinced that the man that was sent to prison was the one guilty of the crime. He returns to his hometown of Bristol, England and begins his own podcast, questioning those who may have known something. The book flip-flops between points of view, alternating between three main characters: Cody and his podcast, the primary detective from the case, and Charlie's mother, who at the time of the murders was very irresponsible and evasive as to her whereabouts on the night of her son's murder. The points of view also alternate from past to present, setting the stage for the reader to try to reconstruct and figure out exactly what happened those twenty years ago.As a murder "mystery", this was a decent book, although I wasn't overly impressed with the way it was presented. The podcast thing just didn't work for me -- it seemed kind of corny and unconvincing. The detective's character was also puzzling to me. I think it was supposed to be that way, but I couldn't figure out if he was power hungry, a little ignorant, a bad guy, or a combination of the three. Things were more or less wrapped up at the end, with most of the major questions answered and a few small surprises thrown in. But something about this book's flow bothered me, and I can't exactly put my finger on it. It was an okay read, but nothing to be blown away over. I've read one of Macmillan's earlier novels and I have to say that I enjoyed it more than this one.
  • (3/5)
    I KNOW YOU KNOW is it a mystery. It is not an exciting one and seems pretty bland at times during the first half of the book. But it becomes more and more of a page turner until the last couple of chapters become a delightful surprise. Twenty years ago two boys were murdered. Although someone was found guilty of the murders and put away, was he really responsible? Now a 20-year-old skeleton of a man is unearthed near where these murders occurred. Are they related?Although the subject matter is definitely meant for an adult, the writing style often sounds young adult, which bores this reader. Some adults prefer “easy reading,” so this may not detract you. It is, however, one of the reasons I do not rate I KNOW YOU KNOW highly.I prefer books that are not so easy to put down as this one is. But, because it does become a really good mystery with an unpredictable finish, I am tempted to call I KNOW YOU KNOW a four-star book. In all honesty, though, I have to consider that it bored me in the beginning. So I rate it three.If you are not put off by a book with a YA writing style, consider this, and try I KNOW YOU KNOW.I won this book through librarything.com.
  • (4/5)
    A new author for me, but I think I’ll look for her other books since this one was so good. The use of the podcast was very effective and would make an outstanding audiobook. I liked how there were bits of information that left you wanting more; Tremain sidelining Fletcher’s career and Smail’s downfall. I wanted more, but there was so much going on I didn’t fixate on them. Another thing I liked was the subtle characterization - she left it up to the reader to infer and deduce quite a bit; like Smail’s verbosity - she doesn’t have other characters think or comment about it. She lets it stand and us to figure it out. Nice since I was reading another book simultaneously in which the writer hit us over the head with certain traits of the people in the book. Like she didn’t trust us to get it. Oy vey.The wrongly-convicted mentally challenged guy aspect put me in mind of Disordered Minds by Minette Walters, but this writer took a different approach and while the crusader aspect was there, it wasn’t as structured. It should have occurred to me that the whole podcast thing was a stunt. First the guy making it claimed over and over again to be a filmmaker. Second the whole missing my best friends thing was laid on a bit thick. You were 10. People who disappear from your life at that age do it in memory as well as reality. But I didn’t and the collusion with Felix was a nice twist. When the Fletcher-Felix connection came to light wheels started turning and I felt less and less sympathy for Fletcher. There was a Felix-Jessy connection, too, but my sympathy for her stayed put. Despite a bunch of typos in my ARC, I connected with the writing and there are both some shop-worn cliches (people having a field day for fuck’s sake...can’t we come up with something else??), but also some nice allusions like this one - “...the roots of his childhood were sunk deep into both concrete and disappointment.” p 241
  • (4/5)
    I was completely engrossed in this book from the moment I started it. This book follows a few different characters who all are connected in some way to the murders of two young boys. One of the characters is Cody Swift who was best friends with those two boys. He has started a podcast twenty years later to uncover the truth. Even though someone had been convicted of the crime he is digging up the past to see if the correct person was convicted.I cannot say that I really liked any of the characters. To me the all seemed to have ulterior motives. I still did enjoy reading about them though. I got so sucked into their lives and what had happened to the murdered boys, Scott and Charlie, that I was dying to know the truth. I thought I knew what was going to be revealed in the end but was wrong. Ultimately I was a bit disappointed with who was behind the murders of Scott and Charlie but I did enjoy the twist at the end.I won this book from a Librarything Early Reviewer's giveaway. That does not affect my review in any way.
  • (5/5)
    Best book I’ve read in a long time. Very current.
  • (4/5)
    This tale holds the reader, until the plot thickens and becomes too convoluted. Still, it is worth the read because this is an author who knows how to write suspense. Approximately 20 years earlier, two eleven year old boys were found buried in a space behind a local dog race track. Detective John Fletcher was on scene, and sadly, one of the children died in his arms.Fast forward to current time when the body of a man is found in the same area, and detective Fletcher is anxious to find a thread linking the murder of the boys and the murder of a local near-do-well man who scammed many out of their life savings.Cody Swift was one of the three boys who were constantly at each other's side in a run down, poverty-stricken neighborhood. Two were murdered, and because he disobeyed his mother and was made to stay inside on the night his childhood friends were murdered, his life was spared.Now an adult, and still haunted by the death of his friends, Cody starts a pod cast. Opening up the story of the tragic death of his friends upsets more than a few members of the community, including John Fletcher.A mentally challenged man was charged with the crime of murdering two boys. He hung himself. Cody and others doubt that the man charged was guilty. John Fletcher may know this truth, and hopefully the pod cast will solve who really murdered the young boys.The premise of the book is good; the writing is above average, but still, I was disappointed at the convolution at the end. When I have to go back and read pages because the story is difficult to follow, then, I deem the book wanting. I wish that the end would have been wrapped up in a more clear manner.
  • (4/5)
    I feel uneasy about the end but everything else is fantastic.
  • (3/5)
    Good idea that is very realistic and very relevant to today’s true crime stories and podcasts. Disappointing ending that didn’t resolve everything and left me feeling like I missed something
  • (4/5)
    This was a good listen. I enjoyed the twist at the end!
  • (3/5)
    I liked that the ending was detailed fairly well, and didn't leave it up in the air. I didn't guess the ending at all. I thought the flash backs were hard to follow at times. The detective is like two separate people, I didn't like how the author used him. I would recommend this book for anyone that likes those true crime tv shows, the style is very similar.
  • (4/5)
    A special thank you to Edelweiss and William Morrow for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Twenty years ago, two eleven-year-old boys were murdered in Bristol. The bodies of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby were found near the dog racing track. Sidney Noyce was convicted of the brutal crime and died in prison. Some people perceive him to be the killer and others think he was a convenient scapegoat because he was mentally challenged and could be easily coerced into a confession. There are still lingering questions after all this time. There was a third boy, Cody Swift, who was supposed to be out with Charlie and Scott the night they were killed, but he got in trouble and had to stay home. It turns out that this punishment actually saved his life. He is now an indie filmmaker and has haunted by the death of his best mates all these years. The unanswered questions and loose ends bring him back to Bristol in search of answers. To help document the information, he starts a podcast which are a series of interviews he conducts with individuals attached to the case. It turns out that there are many people who don't want to visit the past. The one who has the most to lose from Swift's fixation is Charlie's mother, Jess. She is forced to take matters into her own hands in order to protect her daughter from hearing about this horrific crime—she doesn't even know she had a half brother, let alone that he was killed. A body that has been dead for quite some time is discovered in the same location where the boys were found. Another investigation is opened and Detective John Fletcher who was on the original case must revisit his files to see if the two crimes are related. This book was absolutely riveting from the first sentence! I have been on a tear of British mystery/suspense books lately and this one did not disappoint. Having reviewed MacMillan's Odd Child Out, I was hoping to check in again with Detective Jim Clemo. But this book, this book was all its own, and in my opinion her best yet (I have also reviewed The Perfect Girl). It was perfectly executed with enough twists to propel the narrative without becoming predictable or clichéd. And as my followers know, any book that mentions Depeche Mode is a winner! This page-turning, clever novel is filled with complex and layered characters. Congratulations, Gilly on another wonderful accomplishment!