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Never Tell: A Novel

Never Tell: A Novel

Written by Lisa Gardner

Narrated by Kirsten Potter


Never Tell: A Novel

Written by Lisa Gardner

Narrated by Kirsten Potter

ratings:
4.5/5 (109 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Released:
Feb 19, 2019
ISBN:
9781536609523
Format:
Audiobook

Description

#1 New York Times bestseller Lisa Gardner returns with an unpredictable thriller that puts fan favorites D. D. Warren and Flora Dane on a shocking new case that begins with a vicious murder and gets darker from there. A man is dead, shot three times in his home office. But his computer has been shot twelve times, and when the cops arrive, his pregnant wife is holding the gun. D. D. Warren arrives on the scene and recognizes the woman--Evie Carter--from a case many years back. Evie's father was killed in a shooting that was ruled an accident. But for D.D., two coincidental murders is too many. Flora Dane sees the murder of Conrad Carter on the TV news and immediately knows his face. She remembers a night when she was still a victim--a hostage--and her captor knew this man. Overcome with guilt that she never tracked him down, Flora is now determined to learn the truth of Conrad's murder. But D.D. and Flora are about to discover that in this case the truth is a devilishly elusive thing. As layer by layer they peel away the half-truths and outright lies, they wonder: How many secrets can one family have?

Released:
Feb 19, 2019
ISBN:
9781536609523
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Lisa Gardner is the #1 New York Times and internationally bestselling author of more than twenty novels, including seven thrillers in the D.D. Warren series. With more than twenty-two million books in print, she is published in thirty countries and counting. Lisa lives in New England with her family, as well as two highly spoiled dogs and one extremely neurotic three-legged cat.

Related to Never Tell

Titles In This Series (1)

Reviews

What people think about Never Tell

4.4
109 ratings / 14 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    As with all of her books you just have to keep listening. The story demands it and keeps on the edge until it's over.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good story... but you definitely have to suspend reality a bit to believe it.
  • (4/5)
    I hate the series is complete love DD Warren series
  • (3/5)
    Not as great as other Lisa Gardner books but still enjoyable.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent story line. I really enjoyed the plot. Loved the characters and the suspense of who did it! Great book!
  • (5/5)
    Lisa Gardner is the queen of psychological thrillers for a reason. Her stories are always well-written and paced, filled with wonderful characters and plot twists, and delve deeply into the human psyche. NEVER TELL is all that and more. The story revolves around three women: the iconic series character homicide detective D.D. Warren, victim turned activist and confidential informant Flora Dane, and, the focus of this case, Evie Carter. Evie has a history. Everyone knows that as a teenager, she killed her father with a shotgun. An accident, maybe. Now her husband is shot to death, and oddly, his computer is riddled with bullet holes, and Evie is caught red, as in blood, handed. Is this history repeating itself or is the truth something much darker? D.D. and crew must work with Flora, wealthy and charming true crime buff Keith Edgar, FBI SSA Kimberly Quincy, and Evie herself to peel away the layers of these two perplexing crimes. Their search for the truth spirals through many dark alleys, real and psychological. An excellent story, well told.DP Lyle, award-winning author of the Jake Longly thriller series
  • (5/5)
    Never TellByLisa GardnerWhat it's all about...Pregnant Evie walks into her husband’s study and finds him dead. She picks up the gun left there and fires 12 shots into his computer. The next night this house burns to the ground. Flora has escaped from a sex driven madman who kept her hostage for over 400 days. There is a connection with Evie’s husband and her captor...but...what is this connection? Also...Evie was acquitted over 16 years ago of shooting her father...but did she really? This book is a realm of questions! Why I wanted to read it...I picked up this book from my towering pile of TBR’s and after reading the first few pages could not put it down. It became more intense and captivating with every page I read. What made me truly enjoy this book...The characters were unique and often hard core. Why did Evie agree to say she murdered her father? What is wrong with Evie’s well kept mother? What will it take for Flora to forget and get past her abduction? Why you should read it, too...Readers who love a well written fast paced story will really enjoy this book! It has its creepy bits but they only add to this story. I received an advance reader’s copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley and Amazon. It was my choice to read it and review it.
  • (2/5)
    My feelings towards this book surprised me. This is because the last prior books I enjoyed a lot and this included the recent short story that was to hold me until the release of this book. D.D. Warren is a big reason why I liked the prior books. While, I liked her in this book, she could not hold the whole story alone strong enough to keep my attention. In fact, I struggled to find a emotional connection towards the characters and the story as the whole package. Despite, the lack of emotional connection towards the characters, I did keep reading the book and finished it. Sadly, nothing truly came out and grabbed my attention. I can't remember a lot of details about the story. While, this book missed the mark with me, I did look forward to reading the next book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Another incredible outing by Gardner, another interesting case for D. D. Warren. Plus, the very scarred Flora is back, now looking for answers from her time held captive. Two deaths, sixteen years apart, the common denominator a young pregnant woman. All three will connect in a very unusual way.Such a good series, and some terrific characters added to keep the series fresh. This is a tangled weave of a case, one that proves dangerous for a few of the characters. Suspenseful, I couldn't figure out where it was going, but avidly followed along. I love the brief looks into D. D. Warren's personal life, her young son, and young puppy. Adds an element of humor.ARC from Dutton.
  • (5/5)
    Never Tell from Lisa Gardner is the new D.D. Warren (and Flora Dane) novel. I was quickly drawn in by the different viewpoints (three perspectives are used alternately) and loved the ride.This is one of those novels that will generate a lot of the "I knew who did it" comments. They are right, and wrong. Here is why. Most novels of this type offer several suspects and at different times things seem to point to different suspects. As we read further we acknowledge that some are stronger suspects, we may even feel that if we had to decide based on limited evidence we would choose a certain one. Sometimes we're right on that. But that is different from making the big blustery pseudo-intellectual comment "I knew who did it half way through." No, no you didn't. You would be a horrible detective if you made an actual final judgement before other suspects had been ruled out. That said, for those of us who aren't so narcissistic, we "knew" just as early as these people, but we also know that early judgements are often wrong and so we continued doing the detective work, also called reading, until we could eliminate the other suspects as well as confirm one of them. So, that little bit aside, this novel does a wonderful job of presenting several viable possibilities as well as nuances within the possibilities (such as who also had knowledge, who helped or at least didn't hinder, etc). Even when you're pretty sure whodunit, you'll still be looking to see who, if anyone, helped. In other words, don't be a crappy detective and claim you "know" the ending when you don't, it is poor detective work and it shows incredibly sub par reading ability.If you're sometimes thrown off by different perspectives in each chapter, give this one a try anyway. The three characters are distinctively different so you won't have many, if any, situations where you try to remember which character had a particular thought or did a particular action. I like multi-perspective work but I found this one to be one of the better ones.I would definitely recommend this to readers of crime novels, procedurals, and those already familiar with Gardner's work. This can easily be read as a standalone. This focused a little less on Warren so I would also suggest reading some of the earlier volumes in the series to get a more nuanced view of her.Reviewed from a copy made available through Goodreads First Reads.
  • (4/5)
    This was a real page turner, and I liked all the investigators. It was a little dark and I am glad I didn't read the earlier instalment about Flora. The whole plot was borderline believable, but the pace carried me along, apart from the very end: I find it laughable that SPOILERa hitman would refuse to be called off - surely they'd take the money and stay in and watch TV.
  • (5/5)
    An unbeatable combination

    DD Warren and Flora Dane pair up again in Lisa Gardner's new book and it's as good as promised. Both DD and Flora have grown and changed throughout the series, and might even like and respect each other by now. At it's heart, this is a book about mothers and their children, but doesn't skimp on suspense.
  • (5/5)
    I am glad to say that I am not tiring of the D. D. Warren series at all! As with the last few books Flora Dane is a significant character and much of the thriller had her at the center. Never Tell seamlessly presents a link between a current murder and Flora's experience at the hands of Jacob Ness.The title refers to the secrets kept within one family. The protagonist/murder suspect is a liar in deed and by omission. Her parents kept secrets; her husband did the same. These lies and secrets are revealed as the story unfolds.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Lisa Gardner's thriller, "Never Tell," has three central female characters and, in alternating chapters, we observe their reactions to a series of bizarre events. D. D. Warren is a detective sergeant in the Boston Police Department; thirty-two-year-old Evie Carter is a pregnant high school math teacher who was suspected of accidentally shooting her dad when she was a teenager; and Flora Dane was victimized by Jacob Ness, a sadistic predator who held her captive for more than a year. The book opens with the shooting death of Evie's husband, Conrad. Warren along with Flora (who is D. D.'s unpaid confidential Informant and an amateur sleuth), are on the case. A representative from the FBI, Special Agent Kimberly Quincy, and Keith Edgar, a true-crime enthusiast and computer geek, add their expertise to this multi-faceted investigation.

    Gardner earns a great deal of sympathy for Evie and Flora, both of whom have endured unspeakable trauma. Evie's mother, Joyce, a functioning alcoholic, smothers her daughter with unwanted attention, but all Evie wants is the truth. What really happened sixteen years ago when she and her mom came home to find Evie's father, Earl Hopkins, dead? Furthermore, what clandestine activities was Conrad engaged in before he died? Some of the men and women in this book keep secrets and tell lies for reasons that are not immediately apparent. In addition, we are thrust into the murky world of the Dark Web—a portion of the Internet inhabited by criminals eager to communicate with like-minded individuals. Gardener throws in a serial firebug, explores various complex and troubled relationships, and concludes with twists that show us how little we know about the people who are closest to us.

    Although this popular author has written some interesting works of fiction over the years, she piles on the melodrama too thickly here. Moreover, aside from its excessive length (more than four hundred pages that drag, especially during the second half), "Never Tell" irritates us with its painfully slow disclosure of information. Meanwhile, we get to share Evie and Flora's heartbreaking memories, which are all the more poignant because they convey their agony in the first person. Unfortunately, this tale has a number of glaring holes and far-fetched coincidences. It is unlikely that a competent law enforcement officer would allow Flora, a loose cannon if ever there was one, anywhere near an official investigation. Nor does Keith, a civilian, have any business being involved in these proceedings, no matter how intelligent he is and how helpful he tries to be. The story concludes with a dour and heavy-handed resolution that feels tacked on for its shock value. "Never Tell" will likely please Gardner's ardent fans, but it has too many flaws to earn a wholehearted recommendation.

    1 person found this helpful