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Silent Spring

Silent Spring

Written by Rachel Carson

Narrated by Susie Berneis


Silent Spring

Written by Rachel Carson

Narrated by Susie Berneis

ratings:
4.5/5 (60 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Released:
Nov 19, 2018
ISBN:
9781974930333
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Conservationist Rachel Carson spent over six years documenting the effects on DDT—a synthetic organic compound used as an insecticide—on numerous communities. Her analysis revealed that such powerful, persistent chemical pesticides have been used without a full understanding of the extent of their potential harm to the whole biota, including the damage they’ve caused to wildlife, birds, bees, agricultural animals, domestic pets, and even humans.

In this audiobook, Carson discusses her findings and expresses passionate concern for the future of the planet and all the life inhabiting it, calling on us all to act responsibly, carefully, and as stewards of the living earth. Additionally, she suggests that all democracies and liberal societies must operate in a way that allows individuals and groups to question what their governments have permitted to be put into the environment.

An instant bestseller that was read by President Kennedy during the summer of 1962, this classic remains one of the best introductions to the complicated and controversial subject.

Released:
Nov 19, 2018
ISBN:
9781974930333
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Rachel Carson (1907–1964) spent most of her professional life as a marine biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. By the late 1950s, she had written three lyrical, popular books about the sea, including the best-selling The Sea Around Us, and had become the most respected science writer in America. She completed Silent Spring against formidable personal odds, and with it shaped a powerful social movement that has altered the course of history.



Reviews

What people think about Silent Spring

4.5
60 ratings / 37 Reviews
What did you think?
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    My first read of this classic. It wasn't at all what I had expected. Based on environmental books that are popular today, I had expected lyrical descriptive nature writing. No. There's a little of that, but this is more like a compendium of dozens and dozens of investigative reports like you might find in the NY Times or Washington Post. All about chemical poisoning. That can be tedious, but it is also scary how regulation fails and can be suborned. I should probably start eating organic vegetables. Carson advocates strongly for importing insects to combat invasive insects, and she touts as a success when one introduced species is firmly established as a bulwark against an invasive species. As a non-expert, I'm not sure this perspective stands up well to time. Carson makes a good case for paying attention to the bigger picture, and not just going with the flow.
  • (4/5)
    Five stars for what it did in creating alarm about pesticides and indiscriminate spraying. 31/2 stars for the actual read. A dry read especially when dealing with the chemical breakdowns and dealing with those aspects of this story. I can see how this book opened the eyes of many people not familiar with what was happening with pesticides and farming, Many interesting facts in this book.
  • (4/5)
    A 1962 expose on the long-term costs of humanity’s abuse of the environment. Rachel Carson worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and she saw firsthand what pesticides, herbicides, and invasive insects were doing to animals, humans, and the ecosystem.This book was also for the book club I run for zoo volunteers. We had a very good discussion about it. The statistics and anecdotes were very shocking, though 57 years later none of us were exactly sure where society stands on any of the specific cases Carson discussed. Many of our current environmental problems are ones she could not have imagined – there’s no way to know what she would have thought of GMOs or organic panic or plastic vs. paper straws. Some of the solutions Carson proposed seem shockingly nearsighted to me, such as introducing invasive non-native predators to areas with invasive non-native pests. Noooooo! But it was still fascinating to read the origin of so much of our current knowledge about the environment.
  • (5/5)
    the first real book about protecting the environment, Rachel goes into what she and others did to remove poison from the earth and our food. she is one of the big reasons why DDT was banned. Anybody who cares about the earth and what you eat should read this
  • (3/5)
    Anniversary addition of the classic if controversial work. This includes a new introduction with a helpful brief biography of Rachel Carson and an afterword by Edward O. Wilson.
  • (5/5)
    Despite of what Rush Limbaugh says, this book is a classic in so far as bringing environmental pollution to the public discourse. I never forgot about the dieing robins in Minneapolis.