Enjoy this title right now, plus millions more, with a free trial

Free for 30 days, then $9.99/month. Cancel anytime.

Three Wishes: A Novel

Three Wishes: A Novel

Written by Liane Moriarty

Narrated by Heather Wilds


Three Wishes: A Novel

Written by Liane Moriarty

Narrated by Heather Wilds

ratings:
4/5 (175 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 19, 2019
ISBN:
9780062944252
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

A New York Times best seller, Three Wishes is the funny, heartwarming, and completely charming first novel from Liane Moriarty, also the author of number one New York Times best sellers The Husband’s Secret and Big Little Lies.

Lyn, Cat, and Gemma Kettle, beautiful 33-year-old triplets, seem to attract attention everywhere they go. Together, laughter, drama, and mayhem seem to follow them. But apart, each is dealing with her own share of ups and downs. Lyn has organized her life into one big checklist, Cat has just learned a startling secret about her marriage, and Gemma, who bolts every time a relationship hits the six-month mark, holds out hope for lasting love.

In this wise, witty, and hilarious novel, we follow the Kettle sisters through their tumultuous 33rd year as they deal with sibling rivalry and secrets, revelations and relationships, unfaithful husbands and unthinkable decisions, and the fabulous, frustrating life of forever being part of a trio.

Publisher:
Released:
Mar 19, 2019
ISBN:
9780062944252
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Liane Moriarty is the number-one New York Times bestselling author of Big Little Lies, The Husband's Secret, and What Alice Forgot, as well as The Hypnotist's Love Story, Three Wishes, The Last Anniversary, and the Nicola Berry series for children. Liane lives in Sydney, Australia, with her husband and two children. www.lianemoriarty.com.au


Related to Three Wishes

Related Audiobooks


Reviews

What people think about Three Wishes

4.0
175 ratings / 40 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I continually love Liane Moriarty because of her plot twist and turns. Three sisters, triplets, two identical, one fraternal and a lifetime of the difference!
  • (4/5)
    Review coming. Like this author for a quick read that is funny and has meaning. Not disappointed.
  • (5/5)
    I adore this book. It is a cleverly written novel about triplets, and about how different you can be even when you're sisters. The story starts with a row the sisters have, one of them throws a fork at the other, and it is very dramatic. The the story switches back to a year before, and the reader learns how the fight could happen. Very credible, humorous and emotional story.
  • (4/5)
    Triplets face their own issues in their 30's. Funny, good characters.
  • (3/5)
    I am about half-way through Three Wishes. I loved Big Little Lies, and enjoyed The Husband's Secret - now, if I can just get through this book. So far, I haven't found the point. I usually enjoy family interactions, but I must say, this book jumps around and I'm having trouble figuring out what's going on. I'll give it to the end probably, but keep waiting to find out what it's about. I do hope it HAS an end and doesn't just stop.

    UPDATE: I just finished Three Wishes - and for me, it got somewhat better, but I never got into the triplet's lives - I never really cared about any of them - and, as I feared, it just sort of ended. Of course, when a book is about relationships and little more (for me anyway), it can do nothing else but end. I usually love books that look deeply into relationships between sisters, friends, mother/daughters, husbands/wives, but this one, sorrowfully didn't do it for me. I certainly was interested enough to complete the book, but I missed feeling a part of it and actually enjoying the process of learning to get to know the characters.

  • (4/5)
    4/5 stars“Opinions were for other people. It was fascinating how upset they got about them.”Having been quite disappointed in my last Moriarty read (Truly Madly Guilty) I was very pleased with Three Wishes. I think this was her debut novel, and man it was good. Probably the funniest one I've read by her. Sure, her other books also have lough out loud moments, but this one was loaded with them. Also, Moriarty needs to write more books because I have only two to go before I've read all of her works. I've just had such a craving for women fiction this year, particularly Liane Moriarty's women fiction . It's only March of 2018, but I've already read 3 of her books. “You're having one of those days of accumulating misery when you argue violently with someone in a position of power: a bank teller, a dry cleaner, a three-year-old.”I don't know why recently I've been having such craving for women fiction. Maybe because I'm getting closer and closer to being thirty, and her books usually focus on women of that age. Maybe because I cannot get enough of family drama, social life problems, motherhood, relationships and anything else that life throws at women in her books. But I inhale simply inhale her books. “The year Lyn turned twenty-two someone switched her life over to fast-forward and forgot to change it back again. That’s how it felt.”The story follows three women, in this case triplets, and their lives - husbands, kids, family relations. Most of Moriarty's books follow this patter, and in some cases it does gets repetitive, but this book felt fresh for some reason. Maybe because it was her first work, when she found her style. Maybe because the way the story was told brought different perspectives, I don't know, but it was very, very enjoyable. Surprisingly I enjoyed all of the characters in this book, all of the female characters at least: Gemma, Lyn and Cat - all brought something to the table that I could either relate to or just learn from. Gemma was probably my favorite though. Three Wishes deals with grief, separation, siblings relations, divorce, infertility and many more issues. I loved how Moriarty never pulled her punches and always wrote things that I thought myself at times, but was too shamed to admit them. She painted her characters real and flowed, and I loved that. There was no magic solution, no over the top happy ending - it was just life. Definitely recommend.
  • (5/5)
    A year in the life of thirty-ish triples. The usual problems, but handled here with both sympathy and fun. Very likeable characters.
  • (4/5)
    This time, I actually sort of did see the twist coming. Well, one of them. And frankly, not as quickly as I probably should have. But still. I'm getting better.

    I believe this was one of Ms. Moriarty's first novels, although it doesn't feel like it. It employs the same convention as many of her other ones - the point of view of three different characters. In this case, the characters are sisters. Triplets actually (a set of identical twins and one fraternal twin). They are interesting, leading fairly ordinary lives (although none of them have money troubles, which doesn't actually seem that ordinary). But they have challenges, and their relationships with each other, their divorced parents, and their partners are all a bit complicated.

    There isn't a ton to say about this book, other than I enjoyed reading it, and it's kind of perfect for right now, when I have a lot going on at work and home but still want to read something on the bus that isn't going to overly tax my brain. However, one area that rubbed me the wrong way was that one of the characters drives drunk. She only does it once, and actually gets caught and there is a repercussion of sorts. But it was treated so ... lightly? I mean, I think it was meant to show us how the character was feeling, that this person would do this, but still. This person could have killed someone, and it was just weird to have it be some sort of character-building moment as opposed to a really serious thing.

    I'd recommend the book if you're heading out on vacation and want something that isn't entirely a pile of fluff but that is still very fun and easy to read.
  • (4/5)
    This story was very well written about the 33 year-old Kettle triplets. Their characters well very well-developed. Lyn was very organized, Kat has marital problems and Gemma is free spirited and leaves relationships at the 6 month point. It deals mostly with their sibling rivalry and their uniques experiences. It is filled with lots of laugh-out-loud moments but there are some serious situations that they need to deal with also. I loved The Husband's Secret by this author and look forward to reading another of her books. I highly recommend this book If you like chick-lit that is very entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    Another great Moriarty read!
  • (4/5)
    The part I thought was most interesting about this novel was the way each sister tried to define herself in tension with her identity as a triplet and how eventually they each had to figure out who they were independent of that identity. There's stuff about marriage and children and intimacy and having three different main characters means those themes get looked at from a wide variety of viewpoints.
  • (4/5)
    The first of Moriarty's adult novels, totalling seven so far. I've now read three. "Three Wishes" is a warm, sweet, sad series of episodes in a complicated, yet familiar, family. There's much to engage the reader as Moriarty has worked out how to let the reader discover the feelings and thoughts of her characters by what they do and say in her scenes. She evokes our senses to enter into her worlds. Quite a gift.
  • (5/5)
    Three Wishes is the first novel by Australian writer, Liane Moriarty. It is the story of the Kettle sisters: triplets Catriona and Lynette (identical) and Gemma (non-identical). The scene opens at their 34th birthday party at a busy Sydney seafood restaurant. The celebration is a champagne-fuelled noisy, happy one until suddenly one of the sisters stands up, shouts “You have both fucking ruined my life!”, the fondue fork she has been wielding lands in her sister’s very pregnant belly, and she then faints from the shock of what she has done, breaking her jaw on the table on her way down. Enough of a scene to entice any reader to read on! As we learn what led to this moment, and what came after it, we share the Kettle family’s ups and downs. Moriarty gives us an original plot, interesting characters and credible dialogue, as well as humour and heartache. She touches on sibling relationships, especially those between triplets, mental cruelty, young parenthood, adultery, surrogacy, dreams and goals in life. A very enjoyable, heart-warming novel.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. It wasn't as light hearted as other chick lit books I've read, but it had its hilarious moments. It also showed that life does go on.
  • (4/5)
    It's a year in the life of three sisters, triplets, who live in Australia. Lots of swearing and low morals. Yet it was good. I liked the sisters and their experiences and feelings were believable.
  • (3/5)
    THREE WISHES by Liane Moriarty, a humorous chick-lit starring Sydney triplets, Cat, Gemma, and Lyn Kettle –full of dysfunction, wit, family drama, dating and marriage issues, with emotions all over the board, from cheating, hangovers, and secrets.

    The book begins at the 34th birthday party dinner, and a review of the triplet’s crazy roller coaster ride of their life. We meet sarcastic marketing executive Cat and her husband Dan’s affair, a miscarriage and a drinking problem. Next, Gemma- a bit of an airhead, house sitter, and a commitment phobic and her new budding relationship with Charlie. Lastly, Lyn, (the most stable of the bunch) wife and mother, a sticker for time management, and a successful entrepreneur; however experiences panic attacks. Their parents (total dysfunction) have been off and on and now divorced, yet sleeping together.

    I have read many of Moriarty’s books and the other are deeper in content, whereas Three Wishes was funny and witty at times; however, after it moved along, it became quite annoying. Assuming since this is a reprint, (first published 2003) of her debut novel, she has most definitely refined her writing since her earlier book.

    If you want some laughs for a day, would recommend; however, would recommend Moriarty’s more recent books, if you want more of a story to dig into to with substance. Definitely not my favorite of her books; however, I listened to the audiobook and the narrator, Heather Wilds offered a nice accent for the drama filled lives.
  • (3/5)
    What is it like to one of a set of 33-year-old triplets? Author Liane Moriarty gives us an idea in this tale of three wildly different siblings. They all have problems, sometimes with each other, but in the end, they can always depend on each other. Maybe. This debut novel is not quite as good as Moriarty's later books, but it is interesting to see how her writing talent developed.
  • (3/5)
    Australian triplets live, love, laugh and cry their way through marriages, divorces, children and jobs. Interspersed with brief commentary from perfect strangers whose lives they've impacted. I picked this up thinking it was something else entirely. Not my cup of tea, but readable enough.
  • (5/5)
    Liane Moriarty did it again. I adored this book. I was immediately drawn into the characters and all their unique and quirky things they had going on. To be in a set of triplets I'm sure would make your life full of craziness and drama. A great read.
  • (4/5)
    Gemma, Cat, and Lyn are triplets. In the opening pages they are celebrating their birthdays at a posh Sydney restaurant and we see the meal unfold through the eyes of other patrons. Gemma is a wild spirit, the dreamy, untethered sister. Cat is the strong, brash one. Lyn is the organized, uptight one. The three are so close, yet so wildly different. The trio makes up a pretty exclusive club, yet they don’t tell each other some of the biggest secrets in their lives. Starting with the opening scene, there are short chapters sprinkled in from the random points of view of people whose paths crossed with the girls in some fleeting way. It was an interesting chance to see them from the point of view of an outsider. The style reminded me a bit of the way Moriarty used the police interviews to break up the story in Big Little Lies (though I think the technique worked better in that novel). One of the things I love about Moriarty's books is the way she portrays women. They are complicated. They can be jealous, selfless, kind, furious, and more without being labels a "good" or "bad" character. In other words, they are like real women. Her men tend to be a little more one-dimensional, either they are bad guys or they are long-suffering supportive husbands. That's not always true, but it seems like more often than not they fall into one group or the other. The women though don't have nearly the same defined motivations and I love that. Each of the sisters comes across as flawed and vulnerable in different ways. BOTTOM LINE: I love Moriarty's books. This is my least favorite so far though and I would recommend picking it up after you've already read The Husband's Secret and Big Little Lies.
  • (5/5)
    I really like Liane Moriarty's writing style. Her characters get into crazy situations and one cannot help but laugh at their antics. In this story, a set of triplets with very different personalities meet to celebrate their birthday - complete with three separate birthday cakes. After they make their wishes something goes wrong with the celebration and they end up in a huge fight. The recounting of their lives, leading up to and after that fateful birthday, are told from the eyes of strangers who witnessed the sisters at varying points in their lives. Fun, quick, light reading.
  • (3/5)
    I think this book should have actually been titled 'Three Bitches'. Seriously.
  • (4/5)
    Three Wishes is a well written and highly emotional book about the lives of triplet sisters Gemma, Lyn and Cat. While I can't dispute that the book probably deserves a higher mark, I have to settle for 3 1/2 stars as the family drama was very difficult to get through. Feel free to call it personal preference, since that's exactly what it is. I don't regret reading it, although I do wish I had waited until I'd been craving an angst-filled family drama.The author has incredible talent and writes extremely realistic family dynamics that yank the feelings right out of you. That's not a bad thing unless the reader spends too much time in the trenches of marital shouting matches (yes, these fights literally scream off the page), or heartbreaking losses of mothers, and my least favorite, betrayed wives of cheating husbands. If you can get through that, there is the uplifting side of courageous women; sisters who fight like tigers, but stick together no matter what. I loved this example, which happened immediately after a particularly vicious argument between these same girls: “Could I trouble you for a lift?”Lyn rolled her eyes. “Of course.”It was always like that. They never said sorry. They just threw down their still-loaded weapons, ready for next time.So, it wasn't all bad. Scenes like this restored my faith in this crazy family and even made me laugh out loud a time or two. It just seemed to take a lot of heartache for these girls to find their place in the world. Then again, life does get ugly at times. Finally recommendation: Well worth the time to read.
  • (2/5)
    This was a reading group book. Although I did get to the end so it's not terrible, this kind of book is so NOT my interest that I was just glad to get there. I found the characters hard to distinguish and generally didn't care much when I could. I know lots of people love this kind of novel which is fine by me but don't ask me to read it.
  • (3/5)
    The story begins with a set of triplets at their birthday party and goes back to the events leading up to it. Lyn struggles with being a mother, wife and buisness woman. Cat who has the perfect marriage, or so she thinks. Gemma who floats along and changes jobs and boyfriends quite often.I have read three other books by Liane Moriarty, The Husbands Secret, Big Little Lies and Truly Madly Guilty, and enjoyed all three. This book is the authors first and I didn't enjoy it is much.The story starts like the other books I have read, in true Liane Moriarty fashion. Then for me the story slowed up while it was setting the scene. For a while it picked up momentum but then went flat again and began to drag. There were some amusing monents at times as the authors humour was present in the book. I feel that as she has progressed with more books she gets better and better.I'm glad that I have read other books first because if I had read this one then I may not have picked up any more and would miss out on what a good author Liane Moriarty is.
  • (5/5)
    It kept my attention. Glad i did an audiobook. I think an actual book would have been easier to put down.
  • (3/5)
    2.5 stars. Anti-climactic and not as humorous as I had hoped for.
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful book, second time I've read it; the audio-reader made the second time very extra cool, particularly with such a variety of Aussie accents. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Not really understanding why this book had such low ratings. Liane Moriarty is one of my favorite authors and this book is on of my favorites. She’s so creative and remains to perfectly balance shock-factor and realistic situations.
  • (3/5)
    I love Liane Moriarty's books. They are like tlistening to a friend's story. They usually start at one place and end at another. This one did the same, but it wasn't one of my favorites. A little too predictable. The one good thing, it got me out of my reading slump. An easy beach read. Very easy to pick up and put down.