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Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings: 2nd Edition

Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings: 2nd Edition

Written by Philip A. Fisher

Narrated by Christopher Grove


Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings: 2nd Edition

Written by Philip A. Fisher

Narrated by Christopher Grove

ratings:
3.5/5 (116 ratings)
Length:
13 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 20, 2019
ISBN:
9781469075532
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Widely respected and admired, Philip Fisher is among the most influential investors of all time. His investment philosophies, introduced almost forty years ago, are not only studied and applied by today's financiers and investors, but are also regarded by many as gospel. This book is invaluable for investors and has been since it was first published in 1958. This updated edition retains the investment wisdom of the original edition and includes the perspectives of the author's son Ken Fisher, an investment guru in his own right, in an expanded preface and introduction.

Publisher:
Released:
Aug 20, 2019
ISBN:
9781469075532
Format:
Audiobook

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What people think about Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings

3.5
116 ratings / 6 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    4.5 stars rounded up. A classic that is a few spots is definitely showing its age (other than talking about prices in 1/8's).

    The fundamental message: choose a few stocks, choose them wisely after much investigation and comparison, with all your research and evaluation aimed at owning great companies that will perform outstandingly for the long haul (at least 3 years, minimum; left open-ended so as to be "forever" elsewhere; in one or two places put as "3 to 5 years".) And that's it.

    That right there is the thesis of "growth investing." Which is usually take as one camp sort-of-in-opposition to "value investing." But I have a strong feeling Fisher would argue that true growth investing is (future) value investing.

    If I had to pick/summarize his negative thesis, it would be, "Be an investor; don't be a trader."

    Also, interesting comments in the last 1/3 (and particularly in the last section, which is actually titled "Is The Market Efficient?") on his (very dim) view of Efficient Market Theory as it was coming into vogue but before its heyday.
  • (1/5)
    Too many words, nothing useful at all. I am dissapointed
  • (4/5)
    This is the classic - standard - book on investing. It is a testament to the definitive treatment investing receives here that this book, written in the mid-1940s, is still considered to be one of the most important books an investor could read. This is particularly true for the modern investor, who is able to conduct virtually all stock transactions at home, via computer and the internet, without having to turn to a stock broker to perform all trades.Fisher's "15 points" are an excellent summary of what to look for if you want to make serious, long-term, profitable investments in business. The book is not for the "day trader," or the investor who is out to make a quick killing in the market - it is for the serious investor, the one who wants to own part of a company, and through that ownership produce long-term income and wealth.The book has been updated (by Fisher's son, no less), and some of the companies discussed as examples may be somewhat out of date, but - on the whole - the principles apply at all times and for all companies one might be considering investing in.It is a lively - if sometimes a bit wordy - discussion. Fisher clearly knew what he was writing about, and was clearly trying to pass on important information to the reader. If you want to take on the stock market, you had best be familiar with the principles espoused in this text.
  • (3/5)
    One of the classics of stock market advice written by legendary Philip A. Fisher.Good read.
  • (4/5)
    Philip Fisher does not have the following of Ben Graham, Warren Buffett, or Peter Lynch, but there is nevertheless a lot of wisdom about the investment process to savor and digest in this small volume. Like Graham and Dodd's "Security Analysis," the fact that this book was written more than a half-century ago does not diminish the value of the insights it contains. I particularly liked the chapter “The Fifteen Points to Look For in a Common Stock,” which provides a great outline for how to analyze the competitive strategy and operations of a company. Beyond that, Fisher’s discussion of “When to Sell” is quite useful; this is a topic that is often given cursory treatment but one that is arguably more important to preserving an investor’s wealth than deciding what to buy.
  • (3/5)
    It's rare of me to give a business/economics book a decent review, but Fisher's saving grace is that he gave "scuttlebut" and "insider information" proper due without bullshipping people about analysis and trends.