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Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction

Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction

Written by David Enrich

Narrated by BJ Harrison


Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction

Written by David Enrich

Narrated by BJ Harrison

ratings:
4/5 (47 ratings)
Length:
13 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 18, 2020
ISBN:
9780062878847
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

"In Dark Towers, David Enrich tells the story of how one of the world's mightiest banks careened off the rails, threatening everything from our financial system to our democracy through its reckless entanglement with Donald Trump. Darkly fascinating and yet all too real, it's a tale that will keep you up at night." (John Carreyrou, Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times best-selling author of Bad Blood)

A searing exposé of the most scandalous bank in the world, including its shadowy ties to Donald Trump's business empire

On a rainy Sunday in 2014, a senior executive at Deutsche Bank was found hanging in his London apartment. Bill Broeksmit had helped build the 150-year-old financial institution into a global colossus, and his sudden death was a mystery, made more so by the bank's efforts to deter investigation. Broeksmit, it turned out, was a man who knew too much.

In Dark Towers, award-winning journalist David Enrich reveals the truth about Deutsche Bank and its epic path of devastation. Tracing the bank's history back to its propping up of a default-prone American developer in the 1880s, helping the Nazis build Auschwitz, and wooing Eastern Bloc authoritarians, he shows how in the 1990s, via a succession of hard-charging executives, Deutsche made a fateful decision to pursue Wall Street riches, often at the expense of ethics and the law.

Soon, the bank was manipulating markets, violating international sanctions to aid terrorist regimes, scamming investors, defrauding regulators, and laundering money for Russian oligarchs. Ever desperate for an American foothold, Deutsche also started doing business with a self-promoting real estate magnate nearly every other bank in the world deemed too dangerous to touch: Donald Trump. Over the next 20 years, Deutsche executives loaned billions to Trump, the Kushner family, and an array of scandal-tarred clients, including convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Dark Towers is the never-before-told saga of how Deutsche Bank became the global face of financial recklessness and criminality —the corporate equivalent of a weapon of mass destruction. It is also the story of a man who was consumed by fear of what he'd seen at the bank—and his son's obsessive search for the secrets he kept.

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 18, 2020
ISBN:
9780062878847
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

David Enrich is the Business Investigations Editor at the New York Times. He previously was the Financial Enterprise Editor of the Wall Street Journal, heading a team of investigative reporters. Before that, he was the Journal’s European Banking Editor, based in London, and a Journal reporter in New York. He has won numerous journalism awards, including the 2016 Gerald Loeb Award for feature writing. His first book, The Spider Network: How a Math Genius and Gang of Scheming Bankers Pulled Off On of The Greatest Scams in History was short-listed for the Financial Times Best Book of the Year award. Enrich grew up in Lexington, Massachusetts, and graduated from Claremont McKenna College in California. He currently lives in New York with his wife and two sons.


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Reviews

What people think about Dark Towers

4.2
47 ratings / 8 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Fascinating account of a murky area and shows why legal investigators should drag all this into the light.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Of all the tell-all Trump books, this one gets closest to revealing the details of his habit of borrowing from and stiffing lenders. The author shows how a mid-level German institution, the very same one that funded the building of Auschwitz and other Nazi horrors, gets seduced by the massive profits of the warped destructos on Wall Street and tries to emulate them. Caught up in the frenzy is a well-meaning internal regulator, Bill Broeksmit, who fails to put a stop to the Libor rate setting scandal of 2005-2009 that netted the mastermind a cool $100 million bonus (and five years in jail plus permanent banishment from banking). After Broeksmit's suicide, his n'er-do-well son Val tries to find out why his stepfather kept leaving and returning to Deutsche in various audit roles despite his fear of investigation and prosecution and his troubled conscience. Val contacts author Enrich (what an ironic name) and shares the information he finds, including the suicide notes. Enrich, in his role as Finance Editor for the New York Times, had already been looking into Deutsche's singular role as the ONLY bank that would lend to Donald Trump. Enrich also shares some details on the connection between the timing of the resignation of former SCOTUS Justice Anthony Kennedy, his longtime Deutsche executive son Justin Kennedy, Ivanka Trump, and Brett Kavanaugh, but this depths of this travesty remains unrevealed. And so do Trump's tax returns, no thanks to Deutsche lying about whether or not they had them, which they certainly would have in order to have loaned him $300 million. Other travesties include Trump's evil influence over all the departments in the government that are supposed to monitor financial institutions, including the CFPB and the Justice Department, where two prosecutors were previously employed by Deutsche are charged with investigating that same bank.All in all, there's a lot of information shared in a very readable fashion, but Enrich does not scream loud enough for me.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Very in depth, but made me very distrustful of banking industry!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    dull book, he does nothing with the son of the hero. who remains a drug obsesssed boy 'until the end. and who cannot turn his fathers private notes over to anyone who knows how to use them,
  • (5/5)

    4 people found this helpful

    Quite a story. Helps explain relationship of DJT and Russia.

    4 people found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    3 people found this helpful

    I can’t wait until part II plays out! Whether you like the facts or not, This a well researched book for a change.

    3 people found this helpful

  • (1/5)
    Complete mainstream brainwashing author. Its crazy how everyone can create a narrative and sell It in a book.
  • (1/5)
    Liberal. Not interested. In another political coup, had enough of democrats investigations, rather read about their corruption