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The Man Who Walked Through Time: The Story of the First Trip Afoot Through the Grand Canyon

The Man Who Walked Through Time: The Story of the First Trip Afoot Through the Grand Canyon

Written by Colin Fletcher

Narrated by Matthew Josdal


The Man Who Walked Through Time: The Story of the First Trip Afoot Through the Grand Canyon

Written by Colin Fletcher

Narrated by Matthew Josdal

ratings:
3/5 (90 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 21, 2020
ISBN:
9781494546595
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In 1963 Colin Fletcher became the first man to walk the length of Grand canyon, below the Rim. It began with a dream, when he and a friend detoured from a cross-country trip to take a hurried look at the great natural wonder.

Standing on the Rim, surrounded by the profound and almost mystical silence, Fletcher knew that something had happened to the way he looked at things. He also knew that the Canyon, with its depths and distances, cliffs, buttes, and hanging terraces, beckoned to him, calling him on a journey that would challenge both his body and his mind.

Publisher:
Released:
Jan 21, 2020
ISBN:
9781494546595
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

A lifelong interest in local history was sparked by a village schoolmaster when the author was eight years old. He had led his pupils on a short walk from the school to the rather fine church where the group gathered in the shade of a yew tree. No doubt Mr Barnes pointed out important architectural details, but the author only remembers the excitement he felt when told he was standing in the very spot where the roundhead soldiers had stood an unimaginable three centuries earlier, as they attacked the decorated stonework of the church. During a long life, mostly connected to farming in Ontario, Western Australia and Wiltshire, the fascination with history never faded. An understanding of recent centuries merely raised further questions of even earlier times; the succession of questions seemed to become one huge enquiry. Yet this has been a practical life, pursued for the most part in sunshine or rain, long hours of physical labour while caring for farm animals. The pleasure of writing fiction was a late discovery; now an ancient novice is hoping to share that pleasure.


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What people think about The Man Who Walked Through Time

3.2
90 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Colin Fletcher's account of walking the length of the Grand Canyon (or at least that part of it that lies in the National Park) is less about the physical details of his journey and more about his quest for a change of perspective among the Canyon's solitude, and in particular his attempt to understand, fully and viscerally, the immense age of the Canyon's rocks. At times his philosophical musings may seem a bit repetitive or unoriginal, but they are appealingly honest and, I believe, quite valid. And some passages are highly evocative, vividly painting a mental picture of the vast evolutionary web of life, or recalling strongly to my mind the sensations and emotions of my own, infinitely less ambitious, desert hiking experiences.One thing that is a bit disappointing, though, is the lack of pictures. Fletcher correctly points out that relying only on sight gives one a woefully incomplete feel for a landscape like the Grand Canyon's, and that taking pictures can be a bad distraction from actually living your experiences. But he does mention taking photos during the course of his trip, so the reason why they fail to appear in this 1967 paperback is almost certainly economic rather than philosophical. And it's a shame, as I think they would have helped to enhance the reader's sense of making that journey with him.
  • (2/5)
    I thought I'd like this and at the very beginning, I did. But really, although the author did something pretty cool, it wasn't overly daunting. There was not the amount of danger you come across in some other extreme nature challenges (or if there was, he didn't clearly give that impression. And really, it wasn't a book so much about the canyon, but about Colin Fletcher's own quest...and he annoyed me a little. He went into so much detail about what he was carrying and little things he saw - he went into detail about how annoyed he was when he saw signs of man in the canyon at times, but he doesn't go into detail about what happened to all the trash he generated from supplies grabbed at arranged air drops. And there's no way he was carrying it out. Beyond that, there was just a tone that ended up grating against my nerves. I could imagine he wouldn't be the best travel companion. I'd take Bill Bryson over this any day for the humor, or other more serious travel adventure for the level of talent in the writing and the lack of egotism.
  • (4/5)
    A great look at some on who spent a life walking while considering philosophy, history, and methodologies.One of my favorite saying from Colin is: Hell is where the police are Italian, the politicians are French and the cooks are English......
  • (5/5)
    One of my all time favorites ... early Colin Fletcher; deepened my desire to explore the Grand Canyon.
  • (4/5)
    When I first read this book I thought it was wonderful and potentially life-changing. But that was fifty years ago; I've gone elsewhere in the intervening half-century.Fletcher's book is more about his mental journey than the actual walk. I'm pretty sure there are more pages devoted to his rest days than to the actual walk, though I've no intention of checking that statement. What is certainly true is that his mental state is often his actual subject; he's not so much communing with nature as he's contemplating the meaning of life. Or lives, I suppose; he's often musing about the differences between everyday life outside the canyon with his in-the-canyon freedom from that life.A good book, still, and an interesting account of a journey. But I liked it better in 1970, when I was a youngster in an army uniform, stationed on Mount Tamalpias north of San Francisco.