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The Awe Factor: How a Little Bit of Wonder Can Make a Big Difference in Your Life

The Awe Factor: How a Little Bit of Wonder Can Make a Big Difference in Your Life

Written by Allen Klein

Narrated by Brian Troxell


The Awe Factor: How a Little Bit of Wonder Can Make a Big Difference in Your Life

Written by Allen Klein

Narrated by Brian Troxell

ratings:
4/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 4, 2021
ISBN:
9781094418063
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Editor's Note

Lower your stress…

Want to lower your stress? Boost your creativity? Feel more connected to others? Allen Klein shares the science-backed benefits of getting more awe in your life and shows readers how to open up to the wonders all around you. Awesome (we couldn’t resist!) tips and techniques for counteracting the doom and gloom of our COVID era.

Description

Bestselling author and Mr. Jollytologist Allen Klein's latest book will helps readers escape the everyday ruts of our lives and help them open their eyes and find the awe around them.

Publisher:
Released:
May 4, 2021
ISBN:
9781094418063
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Allen Klein, aka “Mr. Jollytologist”®, previous uplifting and motivational books have sold over 600,000 copies. In addition, the author is the recipient of a number of national awards including both the Best New Book of the Year Award and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor, a Communication and Leadership Award from Toastmasters, as well as being a Hunter College, The City University of New York, Hall of Fame honoree. Through his books, workshops and keynote presentations, the author has devoted over 30 year of his life to encouraging people to lighten up, to embrace a positive attitude, and to take back their power. This book will further that goal and validate what comedian Jerry Lewis said about the author: Allen Klein is “a noble and vital force watching over the human condition.” www.allenklein.com


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Reviews

What people think about The Awe Factor

4.1
21 ratings / 2 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    Just a bunch of stories that don’t go really go into what “awe” really is. Waste of time.
  • (1/5)

    5 people found this helpful

    I tried to listen to this. I really really did. I suffer from some pretty awful disabilities that cause major chronic pain 24/7 and for which I take some pretty heavy duty pain medications. I thought maybe this would help. BUT...

    The first chapter--the ENTIRE chapter -- is a bunch of quotes. (Well, as far as I could get before skipping ahead to the next chapter to quiet my rising irritation.) While most of them on their own are fine, together in a long long LONG list they are just annoying. Especially with hardly any space between them for one to contemplate them. This does not inspire awe. If something is awe-some you need time to let it sit with you.

    If a quote inspires awe, ya really ought give it time to soak in.

    So I skipped ahead to chapter 2. More irritation and annoyance, Rising stress expressed in my neck and shoulders. Nope. I do not need nor want to listen to something that annoys me that much, especially since it is SUPPOSED to calm me.

    I have never read nor listened to "Chicken Soup for the Soul" or any other "Chicken Soup..." book. Why? Because I can't stand what I call "happy sappy" quotes and stories.

    Those do NOTHING for me because they are like fairy tales. Well, to be accurate -- because real fairy tales have a lot of doom and gloom in them -- they are like Disney style fairy tales. Historically speaking, REAL fairy tales -- like you find in the collections of the Grimms Brothers -- for which the name "Grimm" is a pretty accurate summation, inspire the kind of awe that leave you shaking with fear. Now, of course, the Grimms' fairy tales are not appropriate to the occasion/purpose of this book.

    The Disney versions are what I would call white washed or "blood washed" stories. Sappy happy stories. Yes, there is a place for those, but that place is not in the heart of someone who has experienced extreme tragedies in her life.

    I do like Hans Christian Anderson fairy tales. They aren't as grim as the Grimms' versions. I especially love The Snow Queen. I enjoy stories -- fairy tale or otherwise -- that have happy endings. But the happy endings come after the main character has conquered many difficult challenges. What is awe-inspiring is how the main character figures out how to solve a very difficult problem. In the end, the monsters are vanquished and the heroes/heroines are celebrated.

    I have spent 72 years having to solve problems that involve "monsters" for me to conquer. And I have had to deal with some doozies -- the kind that can send you into wanting to die, and on a few occasions, trying to hurry that along. Living for 72 years with those kinds of challenges is quite remarkable, really. Something to truly celebrate. Truly awe-inspiring stories that are harbingers of better things to come, because the character becomes stronger, more resilient, and more full of wisdom. Character-building stories where the protagonist comes to a deeper understanding of life and love. And yes even joy.

    Maybe those kinds of stories are in this book. I don't know. I stopped listening--out o sheer frustration. (I have audio versions of books because it is hard for me to concentrate on reading) after about 10 minutes. Why would I not give it more time?

    Because I cannot stand the sound of the narrator's voice. It grates on my nerves. It is not the kind of soothing voice I expected, since the topic is "awe." There's a timbre to it...a tone...a,,,, oh never mind. I can't describe it, other than to say it irritated me. Now, my dad used to read stories to us -- five children -- when we were small. Among other things, he read--yes--Hans Christian Anderson, as well as Mark Twain (Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn), and books whose authors I forget--classics like Black Beauty, for instance. He had a voice that made the scenes and characters come alive. A soothing voice that, in spite of that liveliness, could send the small, sleepy ones among us nodding off to Never Never Land. That's a pretty neat trick, ya know. Having a voice that keeps the older ones on the edges of their seats, but puts the younger ones to sleep.

    I may have missed some good stories. I don't know. Maybe I'll take a look at the text version (which, thanks to ScribD, I can get without paying extra other than my monthly membership fee). But the audio version? No way will I listen to more of it.

    I need to go do some deep breathing to get rid of this tension. Meanwhile, google my name and "fairy tales."

    5 people found this helpful