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At last, one husband reveals the answersto some of mankind's greatest mysteries.Why do men hog the remote? Refuse to stop and ask for directions? Have such a hard time sharing their emotions? Why can’t they drop their socks in the laundry basket instead of near it? What does a man mean when he says “uh-huh”? (No, it doesn’t always mean he’s not listening.) In this wickedly observant collection of essays, Stephen Fried, widely praised as an investigative journalist, turns his attention to the subject of marriage—his own and others. The result is a daring, provocative, often hilarious read that throws incisive light on mysteries that have long plagued womankind: the inner workings of the male mind. Originally published as a series of popular columns in Ladies’ Home Journal—and now compiled in one volume at the request of his enthusiastic readers—Fried’s pitch-perfect essays fearlessly tackle the realities of love, sex, and marriage with both wit and tenderness. Drawing from candid conversations with fellow husbands as well as with his own wife, Husbandry will surprise, disarm, entertain—and tell you more about the man in your life than you could ever learn by asking him.
Published: Random House Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
List price: $12.00
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Availability for Husbandry by Stephen Fried
    I guess, as a not-man, I can't know for sure how accurate or universal these pieces are, but it felt realistic enough. And it was fun to read, if insubstantial. These were originally magazine columns, and probably didn't go over two pages. Much like reading one of the many blogs turned into books. Since the original magazine was Ladies' Home Journal, the pieces stay cleaner than usual works on this genre, which are mostly by stand-up comics. I didn't mind that at all. I'm interested in taking notes on how other couples divvy up household chores, but I don't want details on their sex lives. He did a more balanced job than most at making both members of the marriage sound like generally competent, reasonable people. The rationalization of jealousy was a little creepy, and the female reluctance to learn technology is really just a Boomer and older thing, but most of the rest rang pretty true.more

    Reviews

    I guess, as a not-man, I can't know for sure how accurate or universal these pieces are, but it felt realistic enough. And it was fun to read, if insubstantial. These were originally magazine columns, and probably didn't go over two pages. Much like reading one of the many blogs turned into books. Since the original magazine was Ladies' Home Journal, the pieces stay cleaner than usual works on this genre, which are mostly by stand-up comics. I didn't mind that at all. I'm interested in taking notes on how other couples divvy up household chores, but I don't want details on their sex lives. He did a more balanced job than most at making both members of the marriage sound like generally competent, reasonable people. The rationalization of jealousy was a little creepy, and the female reluctance to learn technology is really just a Boomer and older thing, but most of the rest rang pretty true.more
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