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In the spirit of her blockbuster #1 New York Times bestseller The Happiness Project, Gretchen Rubin embarks on a new project to make home a happier place.
 
One Sunday afternoon, as she unloaded the dishwasher, Gretchen Rubin felt hit by a wave of homesickness. Homesick—why? She was standing right in her own kitchen. She felt homesick, she realized, with love for home itself. “Of all the elements of a happy life,” she thought, “my home is the most important.” In a flash, she decided to undertake a new happiness project, and this time, to focus on home.

And what did she want from her home? A place that calmed her, and energized her. A place that, by making her feel safe, would free her to take risks. Also, while Rubin wanted to be happier at home, she wanted to appreciate how much happiness was there already.
 
So, starting in September (the new January), Rubin dedicated a school year—September through May—to making her home a place of greater simplicity, comfort, and love. 
 
In The Happiness Project, she worked out general theories of happiness. Here she goes deeper on factors that matter for home, such as possessions, marriage, time, and parenthood. How can she control the cubicle in her pocket? How might she spotlight her family’s treasured possessions? And it really was time to replace that dud toaster.
 
Each month, Rubin tackles a different theme as she experiments with concrete, manageable resolutions—and this time, she coaxes her family to try some resolutions, as well. 
 
With her signature blend of memoir, science, philosophy, and experimentation, Rubin’s passion for her subject jumps off the page, and reading just a few chapters of this book will inspire readers to find more happiness in their own lives. 
Published: Crown Publishing Group an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307886804
List price: $11.99
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If you liked the first book, The Happiness Project, you'll like this one, but you won't love it. It adds more to the premise but wasn't quite as innovative as the first one. A good add-on, but get The Happiness Project first.more
The author of the best-selling Happiness Project is back with a new bid for a happier life. I’ve never been a fan of self-help books, but for some reason Rubin’s process hit a nerve for me, in a good way. She talks about improving your life in very simple tangible ways. She sets goals and makes lists and I love that. Instead of a regular review, here’s a list of a few suggestions she made that stuck with me after I finished the book: -Have holiday breakfasts to celebrate with your family. For example, cut toast into a heart and dye peanut butter red for Valentine’s Day. - Appreciate smells, they are a huge part of our life but they aren’t a sense we tend to spend much time on. - Turn your iPhone and laptop off more when you’re with others. - Go on monthly adventures. I tend to do this a lot anyway, but I liked her idea of making date nights adventures instead of just doing the same old thing. - Under react to a problem. - Give the people in your home warm greetings and farewells. - Make the positive argument. If you convince yourself of something in your head (i.e. The Huz intentionally didn’t get that project done this week because he didn’t want to), you’ll come up with a lot of support for that argument. Instead, choose to argue the opposite (i.e. You know, maybe the Huz was really exhausted from work and didn’t have the energy to work on that project. I can offer to help work on it when we have more time this weekend). You’ll find yourself adding support for that new argument in your head. - Follow a threshold ritual, pause for a moment before entering your home to think about all the things in your life that you’re grateful for. Instead of entering your house frustrated by traffic or work, your mood will be lifted before you’ve said a word to anyone. - Use the things in your life; don’t save bubble bath, fancy perfume or a set of dishes for a “special” occasion. Use them and enjoy them! There are other points that made sense to me, but those are a few of the ones that I want to try and apply to my life right now. Like Rubin said in both of her books, I am more than happy with my life but there are little things I can do everyday to make sure I’m not taking it for granted. I don’t think her books would click with everyone. Some people say she’s over doing it by making a check list of things to do every day or she’s pushing too hard to “be happy,” but for me that works. I struggle with many of the things she talks about, like being impatient and easily frustrated. I like that she thinks of actual small steps to try instead of just giving generic advice to “be happier.” I like to constantly try to improve my life and my attitude while at the same time appreciate the wealth of happiness I already have. BOTTOM LINE: The Happiness Project is the stronger of the two books, so if you’re interested I’d recommend starting there. If you really enjoyed that one and wouldn’t mind a bit more on the subject then I think this one would be right up your alley.  more
The author's first book, The Happiness Project, was engaging and enjoyable to read. This book was boring and felt self-indulgent. I found myself skipping over larger and larger sections and finally gave up. Very disappointing.more
Disappointingly self involved and banal. Read her first book, which is useful, but don't bother with this one.more
A peek into the author's 9-month long project to make home a happier place, with philosophy and self-help tips woven throughout. It wasn't quite enough of any one thing to be completely satisfying, and I found some parts a bit clunky, but overall, it's a sweet, thoughtful look at how to make life more satisfying where it matters.more
I absolutely loved Rubin's earlier book, The Happiness Project, so I was excited to read her follow up work. But for me, it didn't deliver like the first read. I felt Rubin promoted herself and her ideas too often and her priorities didn't resonant with me. There are some interesting points in the book but I liked how she included research studies, philosophers' input and blog comments into her first book. Happier at Home was too Rubin-centric for me but I think my expectations were high because I loved her first book.more
Your happiness starts at home. All the great philosophers tell us this. As does happiness guru Gretchen Rubin in her new book, Happier at Home.Rubin narrows her focus on happiness here in this, her second book on happiness, but she also delves more deeply. Another delightful book, part self-help, part memoir.Happily, I recommend it.more
“Yet again, I saw the effect of the resolution to ‘Act the way I want to feel.’ By acting in a thoughtful, loving way, I boosted my feelings of tenderness toward my family. And that contributed more to the happiness of our home than anything else I could do.”I’ve been reading Gretchen Rubin’s The Happiness Project blog for about 6 months now and I am always struck by how practical and normal and simple and approachable it all is. So I was DELIGHTED when I saw that her second happiness-related book was out of NetGalley.In Happier At Home, Rubin undertakes another project – a project to make her home happier (having focussed on herself and her general life in The Happiness Project). It’s still quite general and focusses on truths that Rubin learned during her first project. She tackles various themes (possessions, parenthood, marriage, neighbourhood) on a month-by-month basis and while not everything works out how she had planned, she discovers a number of great changes in her life.“In my mind, the entire globe revolves around a single spot, where a bridge red ‘You Are Here’ arrow hovers undetected above our roof.” The writing does seem a little relentlessly optimistic, and I’m a touch suspicious of the alleged perfect relationships with all family members; but it does come across as authentic and real. I found the chapter on marriage particularly touching – Rubin is not always successful in making the more generous choice, but it is very interesting to see someone with Rubin’s talent for articulating feelings examine intra-familial conflict.“When my days were following their ordinary course, it was hard to remember what was truly important, and my happiness project helped charge my life with more gratitude and contentment.”I did sit and read this straight through over a number of days (that is, I was reading it as a book rather than a reference text), but I’m very tempted to buy the book in hard copy as a reference text – something to dip into now and again for ideas and inspiration and consolation.more
Read all 10 reviews

Reviews

If you liked the first book, The Happiness Project, you'll like this one, but you won't love it. It adds more to the premise but wasn't quite as innovative as the first one. A good add-on, but get The Happiness Project first.more
The author of the best-selling Happiness Project is back with a new bid for a happier life. I’ve never been a fan of self-help books, but for some reason Rubin’s process hit a nerve for me, in a good way. She talks about improving your life in very simple tangible ways. She sets goals and makes lists and I love that. Instead of a regular review, here’s a list of a few suggestions she made that stuck with me after I finished the book: -Have holiday breakfasts to celebrate with your family. For example, cut toast into a heart and dye peanut butter red for Valentine’s Day. - Appreciate smells, they are a huge part of our life but they aren’t a sense we tend to spend much time on. - Turn your iPhone and laptop off more when you’re with others. - Go on monthly adventures. I tend to do this a lot anyway, but I liked her idea of making date nights adventures instead of just doing the same old thing. - Under react to a problem. - Give the people in your home warm greetings and farewells. - Make the positive argument. If you convince yourself of something in your head (i.e. The Huz intentionally didn’t get that project done this week because he didn’t want to), you’ll come up with a lot of support for that argument. Instead, choose to argue the opposite (i.e. You know, maybe the Huz was really exhausted from work and didn’t have the energy to work on that project. I can offer to help work on it when we have more time this weekend). You’ll find yourself adding support for that new argument in your head. - Follow a threshold ritual, pause for a moment before entering your home to think about all the things in your life that you’re grateful for. Instead of entering your house frustrated by traffic or work, your mood will be lifted before you’ve said a word to anyone. - Use the things in your life; don’t save bubble bath, fancy perfume or a set of dishes for a “special” occasion. Use them and enjoy them! There are other points that made sense to me, but those are a few of the ones that I want to try and apply to my life right now. Like Rubin said in both of her books, I am more than happy with my life but there are little things I can do everyday to make sure I’m not taking it for granted. I don’t think her books would click with everyone. Some people say she’s over doing it by making a check list of things to do every day or she’s pushing too hard to “be happy,” but for me that works. I struggle with many of the things she talks about, like being impatient and easily frustrated. I like that she thinks of actual small steps to try instead of just giving generic advice to “be happier.” I like to constantly try to improve my life and my attitude while at the same time appreciate the wealth of happiness I already have. BOTTOM LINE: The Happiness Project is the stronger of the two books, so if you’re interested I’d recommend starting there. If you really enjoyed that one and wouldn’t mind a bit more on the subject then I think this one would be right up your alley.  more
The author's first book, The Happiness Project, was engaging and enjoyable to read. This book was boring and felt self-indulgent. I found myself skipping over larger and larger sections and finally gave up. Very disappointing.more
Disappointingly self involved and banal. Read her first book, which is useful, but don't bother with this one.more
A peek into the author's 9-month long project to make home a happier place, with philosophy and self-help tips woven throughout. It wasn't quite enough of any one thing to be completely satisfying, and I found some parts a bit clunky, but overall, it's a sweet, thoughtful look at how to make life more satisfying where it matters.more
I absolutely loved Rubin's earlier book, The Happiness Project, so I was excited to read her follow up work. But for me, it didn't deliver like the first read. I felt Rubin promoted herself and her ideas too often and her priorities didn't resonant with me. There are some interesting points in the book but I liked how she included research studies, philosophers' input and blog comments into her first book. Happier at Home was too Rubin-centric for me but I think my expectations were high because I loved her first book.more
Your happiness starts at home. All the great philosophers tell us this. As does happiness guru Gretchen Rubin in her new book, Happier at Home.Rubin narrows her focus on happiness here in this, her second book on happiness, but she also delves more deeply. Another delightful book, part self-help, part memoir.Happily, I recommend it.more
“Yet again, I saw the effect of the resolution to ‘Act the way I want to feel.’ By acting in a thoughtful, loving way, I boosted my feelings of tenderness toward my family. And that contributed more to the happiness of our home than anything else I could do.”I’ve been reading Gretchen Rubin’s The Happiness Project blog for about 6 months now and I am always struck by how practical and normal and simple and approachable it all is. So I was DELIGHTED when I saw that her second happiness-related book was out of NetGalley.In Happier At Home, Rubin undertakes another project – a project to make her home happier (having focussed on herself and her general life in The Happiness Project). It’s still quite general and focusses on truths that Rubin learned during her first project. She tackles various themes (possessions, parenthood, marriage, neighbourhood) on a month-by-month basis and while not everything works out how she had planned, she discovers a number of great changes in her life.“In my mind, the entire globe revolves around a single spot, where a bridge red ‘You Are Here’ arrow hovers undetected above our roof.” The writing does seem a little relentlessly optimistic, and I’m a touch suspicious of the alleged perfect relationships with all family members; but it does come across as authentic and real. I found the chapter on marriage particularly touching – Rubin is not always successful in making the more generous choice, but it is very interesting to see someone with Rubin’s talent for articulating feelings examine intra-familial conflict.“When my days were following their ordinary course, it was hard to remember what was truly important, and my happiness project helped charge my life with more gratitude and contentment.”I did sit and read this straight through over a number of days (that is, I was reading it as a book rather than a reference text), but I’m very tempted to buy the book in hard copy as a reference text – something to dip into now and again for ideas and inspiration and consolation.more
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