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In his New York Times bestselling novel, David Levithan introduces readers to what Entertainment Weekly calls a "wise, wildly unique" love story about A, a teen who wakes up every morning in a different body, living a different life.

Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.

It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

With his new novel, David Levithan, bestselling co-author of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, and Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist, has pushed himself to new creative heights. He has written a captivating story that will fascinate readers as they begin to comprehend the complexities of life and love in A’s world, as A and Rhiannon seek to discover if you can truly love someone who is destined to change every day.

Published: Random House Kids an imprint of Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780307975638
List price: $9.99
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This is a riveting, well-paced, inventive story. It goes on my short list of modern YA fiction I'd recommend for classroom discussions or book club reading. There are SO MANY topics introduced which should engage young people and help them examine their predjudices and attitudes. Highly recommended.more
A is a 16 year old who wakes up in the body of a different teenager of similar age and geography every day. Since this has been going on for as long as A can remember, A has adjusted and for the most part moves through life reading, playing video games, and trying not to have too big of an effect on those whose lives A occupies. That is, until A meets Rhiannon and everything changes.One can't help but root for A as they deal with all of the trappings of first love with the additional unusual problems that accompanies A's peculiar circumstances. Every Day provides an excellent consideration of identity and authenticity, which we all begin to deal with around that time in our lives. My reading of this public library book was colored by the fact that a teenager had read and annotated the book entirely through the lens of some kind of personal love triangle happening in her life between herself, her best friend/crush, and her present boy friend. She underlined all of the passages in the book about love (a fair amount), sometimes making notes about which of the young men to which each pertained. At the end she wrote in a dramatic, "Good Bye, Wes." I suppose we always bring our own experiences to bear as we read fiction, but it was very interesting (and occasionally exasperating) to read this particular story of teenage love and angst through the lens of another's love triangle.more
Interesting premise. The theme is perspective-taking. Fantasy.more
In this fun Young Adult novel, a sixteen year old young man wakes up every day in a different sixteen year old body - sometimes a young man, sometimes a young woman, sometimes straight, sometimes queer, sometimes hot, sometimes not. Each day he finds himself with new parents, a new house, new siblings - an entirely new reality, somewhere in Maryland. He has both the memories and understanding of his borrowed person for a day, and those of his own perpetually reincarnating self.

The protagonist's situation is a lot like being sixteen years old, and struggling to discover who you really are in a shape shifting growing body/self. The book grabbed me right away with its premise and sparkly writing. When the protagonist meets a special young woman and seeks to prolong his relationship with her in spite of having a new body in a different town each day... a fine YA novel ensues. I enjoyed it.

Thankfully, the author offers no explanation for this strange phenomenon - that's just the way it is in this world. Whether or not there is a way out of the gilgul is something that is left for the last pages, and comes in a satisfyingly unexpected form.

I would characterize this as a romantic adventure written for young men, from a young man's point of view. I am not an expert on YA fiction, but I think that this male perspective makes it somewhat unusual within the romantic adventure genre. While readable and enjoyable by either gender, obviously, and while very exploratory with gay, lesbian, transgender and straight characters, on balance the protagonist's heterosexual love interest and young male perspective are at the center of the novel.

I almost think my almost sixteen year old son would enjoy it. It certainly captures a lot about how emerging sexualty and love and relationships and parents and friends feel at that age.

I recommend it for actual sixteen year olds and former sixteen year olds who would like to re-experience what it was like to live in a body so new they barely knew it at all.

~

Fun Questions Raised by Every Day

Does love outlast the body? Is love always embodied?

How much of a person is inside of him/her, and how much is carried, held, by all the people around him/her?

If you were inside of your love's brain/soul, would your love be there too? Or would that get a little crowded?

What would you remember, and what would your love remember of inhabiting the same body, once you no longer did? How would that morning after conversation go?

Could you sustain a relationship with a unified person who serially inhabited arbitrary, (although age constant?!) bodies? (And how many realities is THAT a metaphor for?)

Could you recognize your love if he or she approached you clothed in a completely different body? (Heh heh, a fine excuse: "That WASN'T you last night? I was sure I recognized the glint in your eyes. I see. You were waiting for me to come home. Well, this IS embarrassing.")

All these implicit questions and more, from a mere YA novel...more
"A" is a 16-year-old who, for as long as he/she (doesn't identify with one gender or another) can remember, has woken in the body of a different person each day. The person whose body A inhabits for a 24-hour period is always the same general age and lives in a geographic area of about a 100 mile radius, but other than those parameters, A might wake up as a male, female, gay, straight, Asian, Latino, Caucasian, Black, in a myriad of functional and dysfunctional family situations. A has gotten used to the lack of connectivity with others that this allows-- until s/he meets Rhiannon. When s/he inhabits the body of Rhiannon's loser boyfriend Justin for a day, s/he is smitten, and can't get her out of his/her head or heart. As A inhabits other teens, s/he keeps finding excuses to meet Rhiannon again, until finally s/he tells Rhiannon his/her secret. At first, Rhiannon doesn't believe it, but she is convinced over time and must then come to terms with whether she can love someone strictly for what's on the inside, when the outside changes every day.

Levithan does a marvelous job with the voices of his characters (including the varied ones whom A becomes for a day), and with the thought-provoking situations that arise as A moves from one body to another. When one of the teens, Nathan, realizes that he has been "inhabited" and claims that Satan possessed his body, it quickly makes the news, and a preacher who is overly interested in Nathan's story turns out to play an important part in the decisions that A and Rhiannon ultimately reach.more
picked this book up from the library on a whim. I volunteer there twice a week, so I spend a lot of time walking past books, and this one caught my eye. The author wrote another book that a friend of mine has been telling me to read and the summary on the back sounded good, so I borrowed it. I was glad I did because even though it is a “young adult” book and a quick read, I enjoyed it.The premise of Every Day is that the protagonist, a 16 year old who has taken the name A, wakes up in a new body (of zir own age) every day. Ze (ze is a gender neutral pronoun) can “access” the host body’s memories and generally tries to go about zirs day without disrupting the life of the body’s owner. A’s life has been like this for as long as ze can remember. Furthermore, A has no idea why or how this happens, just that it does. A also doesn’t know what zir original body is: boy or girl, straight or gay. A has experienced all types of genders and doesn’t feel anymore at home in one type of body than another. Each chapter of Every Day tells us what day A is on. The book opens with day 5994 with A inhabiting a boy named Justin. This leads A to Rihannon, Justin’s girlfriend, with whom ze immediately falls in love. On that day, A breaks zirs own rules and disrupts Justin’s life, skipping class with Rihannon to drive to the beach and get to know each other. The next day, A is desperate to meet Rihannon again. Luckily, A seems to stay within a relatively small geographical area so on any given day our protagonist isn’t too far away from the love interest. The book chronicles A’s efforts to meet her and get her to see A’s inner self, apart from the physical trappings. They deal with issues of attraction and sexuality and try to figure out what it means to be with someone who is a different person every day.I felt that it had some strong themes that would be good for teenagers who are still trying to figure out who they are. Feeling like you’re a totally different person every day is not uncommon for a lot of teenagers (or, let’s be real, 20-somethings) and Every Day plays with that concept quite literally. At one point, A tells the reader, “Part of growing up is making sure your sense of reality isn’t entirely grounded in your own mind” and I have to agree. You can always spot the mature children based on how aware they are of things that go on that have nothing to do with them. And from a perspective of advanced reality-awareness, being able to navigate the world around you without basing all your decision on your immediate feelings or hormone situation really is the secret to being a level-headed adult.Another identity-related theme is our protagonists attitudes about sexuality. I know that not everyone is going to agree with this sentiment, but there is a part in the book where A expresses that zir preferences aren’t based on what sex organs people have, but on the person as an individual. Or, as I like to put it: love the person, not the parts. Again, I know that not everyone will feel this way, but I feel like for young LGBTQI (especially for the “questioning” part), the message that it’s not a big deal which gender the people you like are is an important one. It’s okay to just like people for themselves and not based on your considerations of how to have sex.As a practically inevitable counterpoint to A’s genderless attraction preferences, ze is thrown into contact with some people who strongly disagree with those ideas. A ruminates on the family of one boy whose body he inhabits; the children are homeschooled in the extreme Christian way (not the cool, learn what you want and experience life way) and the mother goes berzerk when he catches her son (so it seems) kissing a girl–the beloved Rihannon. A remarks on the lecture ze received about “the sins of the flesh” and comments, “I want to tell [the mother] that ‘sins of the flesh’ is just a control mechanism–if you demonize a person’s pleasure, then you can control his or her life.” Speaking as an ex-Mormon, I find this to be totally true. Control of one’s sexuality is an all too common tactic that religions use to keep people down. Even though A feels this way, ze also expresses a lot of empathy for people who go to church. As a by product of zir life, A has been to all kinds of religious services. A emphasizes to the reader that religions have about 98% in common, and it’s that other 2% that everyone wants to focus on. Even though I am not a religious person, I liked that bit of perspective. It is a good point and I think that we do focus on the differences when we disagree with someone, rather than on the vast amounts we might have in common. And that’s really the point of Every Day. A wants us to focus on the commonalities of human experience as a way to come together, rather than dwell on the minute differences and let ourselves be dragged apart.As a fan of science fiction and fantasy, I enjoyed the premise (a new body every day), but I did want there to be more to it. Of course, that would make it a dedicated genre novel, rather than more of a YA work. The way I see it, there are two ways to interpret A’s condition: either ze is some kind of “soul” that isn’t linked to a body, or A body swaps every day, with the essence of the host body going to A’s body somewhere. Based on A’s description of how the mind of zir host works (the host seems to remember the day how A wants him/her to remember it, A can access memories of the host’s life), the latter interpretation seems unlikely; however, it is the better launching point for telling an alternate perspective of this story. Imagine, A’s body somewhere waking up everyday confused and alarmed. Parents come in and ask “What’s wrong, Liam?” (or whatever A’s possible “real” name is). The guest consciousness panics, “Liam? Who’s Liam? My name is Ashley. Wait … who are you and WHERE AM I?” You’d get various levels of hysteria from different personalities. Frustrated, Liam’s parents seek professional help, seeing a new doctor every week it seems like. Every day, Liam is someone else and the people are so detailed. Liam is so young, where does he get these ideas? Even worse, Liam never recognizes his parents. Eventually, unable to cope, Liam’s parents send him to a psychiatric institution. Every day, the psych tech wakes Liam up and sometimes she’s frustrated and sometimes she laughs at him. He sees the doctors who ask, “Who are you today?” Every day, Liam is someone new. I think that is a story that would be fun to write, perhaps I will look into that, although it’s likely that the premise has been used before. Even though Every Day didn’t delve deep into the genre stuff, I still liked the system created around A’s talent, if you will. It was consistent and it was interesting. This book might be disappointing if you’re looking for serious science fiction or fantasy, but if you think the premise sounds interesting and you like young adult literature, you will probably enjoy this book.------------------------To comment or read more reviews, visit digitalmanticore.commore
One thing I love about Levithan's work is how unique it is. I can't imagine how daunting creating a different physical character with a different life for every day that A has to inhibit that person's life and still make a continuous narrative that overlays on those other stories. The structure highlights just how much of our personality and the life we create is individual and universal.
Levithan also is not afraid to tackle some BIG topics, like identity, gender, personal responsibility, love, attraction. For other authors it would be too much, but Levithan is great with incorporating these elements without overwhelming the reader.
I also appreciate that he doesn't try to wrap up his stories in pretty bows. He leaves things ambiguous and open which as a reader can be frustrating but it more authentic, especially in this kind of story.
Not my favorite of his but still incredibly well written and unique read.more
I didn't have a lot of time to finish this before book club. I had today off, and I figured I'd be able to make a sizable dent in it, because people had told me it was a quick read. Well, I ended up finishing it in just a few hours.

I really liked it. It was a fascinating concept - can you love someone who is a different person (on the outside) every single day? I really liked the way the author set about answering that question, and I liked the answer that he came to. I thought the book ended just the way it should. And he also raised a lot of other interesting issues about physical appearance, gender, sexuality, family, the way we treat others, and the meaning of a life.more
Fascinating, fascinating concept. And utterly lonely. Think about it: you are not anchored by anything or anyone. You are an island. Anytime you make friends, they are gone the next day. Anytime you react to something, all other people will think it is the body's owner reacting. A tragedy. Truly.

As usual, Every Day is gorgeously written by Levithan. And he invokes fascinating thoughts about gender, sexuality, drug addiction, what is good, how much a person should interfere, etc., etc. But the larger question is how much should A get to own his life.

What I most applaud about this book are the boundaries Levithan set up for A's "ability." There are rules to what happens when the clock strikes midnight. And Levithan acknowledges and plays along with these rules - as he should. A is old enough to have figured some things out. It would be almost inexcusable if A didn't have SOME answers about what happens to him. But A has also figured out how to mess with the rules. And I think that's also great. And wonderful. The fact he has an email account delights me.

When it comes to the bigger questions Levithan asks about A's interference into the lives of others and religion and whether there are others like A out there, it's pretty nebulous. I expect it will invoke some strong opinions one way or the other.

All in all, a great book - gorgeously written, strong characters, fast-paced plot. The best part, though, was how many different questions and thoughts it generated in ME. Meaning it probably would make a fascinated book for an (open minded and awesome) book club.more
I wasn't sure I was going to like this but it was so much better than the last book I read with this premise and I really did like it.more
I liked Quantum Leap many years ago and this has a similar concept so I thought that it would be fun to read. So disappointed! I didn't like the ending at all and felt that the author was trying to push the gay agenda in an overly preachy way. I also didn't think the characters were very well-developed. I guess having A change bodies every day made that more difficult but that made the character development feel flat and lifeless.more
Every Day chronicles the life of sixteen-year-old A, who wakes up each morning in a different person's body. A does his best to respect each person's life, going along with their daily schedule until he meets, and immediately falls in love with, a young girl named Rhiannon. Suddenly, A has to decide how to maintain his body's normal life and get the attention of the girl he loves.

This novel is well written and has a unique premise, but is rather heavy-handed when dealing with its message. There are great sections that move through A's feelings towards Rhiannon and really capture the emotional intensity of incipient love. However, there were other sections that did little to progress the plot or develop the characters and served mostly just to reiterate the idea that lifestyles of any race, gender, or sexuality should be accepted. Now, as far as messages are concerned, this is certainly a good one, but its always preferable if an author lets the story develop its message naturally instead of hammering it into its readers.

The book also jumped the gun slightly on starting its love story. It felt almost like Levithan didn't realize just how unique and interesting his premise was, so, rather than providing a couple chapters to introduce the complexities of A's life, he dove straight into the love story in the first chapter.

But, criticisms out of the way, this is not a book that anyone will regret reading. It is entertaining and captivating, and provides an appealing, creative view of every day life (even if it doesn't flesh itself out as much as it could).

In the end, this book is a fun, interesting, and easy read even though it doesn't entirely reach its potential.more
Oh my goodness. This is beautiful and so cleverly done. Shades of the time traveller's wife, teens and adults will love this.more
My aunt and I recently went to the 2012 National Book Festival in DC, and during the trip, I talked to her about the authors I wanted to see. I mentioned David Levithan and that I had just started to read Every Day. My aunt said, “Oh, it sounds interesting. I’ll have to check it out.” And I replied, “The premise should not logistically work but oh my god it does and it’s brilliant.” Yes, there were moments when my brain stopped to ask how this should actually work, but it’s just so well done, I kicked my brain and carried on.

And to be fair, I did knock the premise of the book at first, mostly because I’m a little tired of “My life is mundane (even by fantastical standards) but LO I HAVE MET [LOVE INTEREST] AND MY LIFE IS CHANGED SUNSHINE SPARKLES AND RAINBOWS.” But when it’s well-done, I can roll with it, and that is exactly what Levithan does. I liked that A has questioned the implications of what they do even if they don’t really influence the actions of the person they’re inhibiting at the moment. (Note: It is really hard not to describe A with specific gender pronouns. Just saying.) I also loved that A’s had to grapple with the fact that they don’t get a ‘tomorrow’ before, and that meeting Rhiannon just brings that idea up again. And I loved that the whole conflict is summed up so perfectly by using a line from “Running Up That Hill” (a song I love btw) and it just fits so well into the whole book and such a fantastic metaphor.

A could have been a frustrating character in that they don’t really have a set personality—not that A takes on the full personality whatever person they’re inhibiting, but A doesn’t really define themselves by being just one thing. I liked that even though a large part of A’s development is that they can make a difference in the lives they inhibit, particularly with Kelsea, but it never feels too preachy or overstated. I liked that A generally does accept the bodies they wake up in and just rolls with the punches. The only time I had an issue with that is when A wakes up in the body of an overweight boy and freaks out about “Omg I’m so disgusting I can’t let Rhiannon see me like this” and that whole day comes off as pitying that boy. It felt a little too fat-shaming to me. But I did like that A has to deal with the physical and mental problems of each person they inhibit—the whole day with Kelsea being my standout. It takes a lot to deal with that kind of depression and just how A and Rhiannon deal with it…heart-breaking. I loved that A gets confronted with their own perception of how people can be. This shows up more whenever A confronts Rhiannon about how her boyfriend treats her, and Rhiannon flat-out says that A’s got a biased perception of the situation.

I really liked Rhiannon. She felt like a normal girl, not a free spirit or a popular person or emo kid, just normal. And she’s caught in between a boyfriend with whom all the passion has kinda dimmed and some kid who’s experiencing new things every day. I liked that she genuinely cares about people, like when she checks up on some of the other teens A’s gone into to see if they’re doing all right. I even liked that she still loves Justin and calls A out on their biased opinion of Justin being a douchebag. (Well, Justin is but not all the time. That definitely felt realistic.) Rhiannon could have been too goody-two-shoes Mary Sue, but she never falls into that role.

And from what we did get of the other kids, I really liked them. Loved Nathan—he’s not the only one A uses in order to see Rhiannon, but he’s the one who gets the brunt of the effects. And I liked that he’s pissed off about it, and does confront A about what happened. Nathan’s reasoning of what happened feels a little too fantastical, but it felt like a logical leaped conclusion, and I also liked that even Nathan has to reconcile his ideas of what happened that day with A’s reasons. I loved the little glimpses we got into everyone’s lives, even if we never got the sense of their personalities. It’s especially interesting when A runs into their previous bodies and gets to see the reactions to their missing days. And I liked that there’s a hint that A isn’t the only person who jumps. It’s not brought out in too much detail, but I liked that we got to see that A isn’t an anomaly.

This is a book that could have failed if anyone else had written it, if the focus was too narrow (see my aforementioned misgiving), if A was too bland or too snarky or had too much personality—there’s a lot of what ifs. But Levithan manages to take a premise that’s complicated and raises too many questions and turns it into this beautiful novel and just…I can’t say enough. Definitely one of the best books I’ve read this year.
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A Quantum-Leap-esque main character, but with some differences. He's been doing it since birth, so "he" isn't even a he - he feels equally at home as a boy and as a girl. He always inhabits bodies of kids about the same age he would be. He doesn't time travel, or jump around in space too much (a few hours away maybe).

Levithan uses this young narrator as a way to explore medical issues, mental illness, obesity, and the fundamental ways we connect with one another.

So good. I expected the ending, but in a way, didn't... but I won't talk about that here. ;)more
Due to copy and paste, formatting has been lost.I feel like Every Day was written just for people who are romantic. People want to believe in true love, along with loving the same person even when they're in different bodies. What's my problem with that, you ask? Nothing. I want to believe it too. But I had a hard time believing it in this book. Our main characters, A and Rhiannon, simply fell in love way too fast. Page 22, first day meeting each other for A, and 5 days later for Rhiannon. I do not believe in love at first site, so that was a little off the grid for me.Rhiannon was a little off the grid for me too. She seems nice and fun, but she doesn't have enough development as a character to really work for me. Neither does A, in a sense.However, I was willing to play along with that. And I learned that A is apparently not a teenager, because no teen that I know talks metaphorically. He (I say he) thinks philosophers' thoughts, which makes him kind of unbelievable. I just have issues with that kind of telling, because no teenager says things like that! At least, none I know.Which brings me to my third point-- we get to see so many different lives, and yet it's not like we're experiencing it. It's like we're being told about all the things going on. I never really felt like I could get immersed in the story, which was unfortunate. It kept me reading, though. I did really want to know what happened, because the premise was just so unique!I feel like the ending was perfect. It all worked out so fantastically, which makes me oh-so-happy! I was really afraid that A was going to do something stupid, but it turns out that he didn't, so yay! It all worked out, even if it wasn't exactly the way that I expected.All in all, I enjoyed Every Day, but I expected a little more.more
This book will break your heart. This book will get you excited about writing. This book will make you want to stop writing because you will never write this well.“A” exists in a life that we cannot imagine. Every morning, “A” wakes up in a different person’s body. “A” lives a different life every day. Never knowing where it will be or who it will be. Sometimes “A” is female, sometimes male. Fat, thin, a-grade student, drug addict, nerd, jock, goth, happy, depressed, abused, loved. Whatever comes “A”’s way there are rules to live by. Then “A” meets Rhiannon while in the body of her boyfriend Justin and in an instant everything changes.All of a sudden, “A” is attached. “A” continues to have contact with her after he has moved on – against all the rules. For the first time “A” has found someone to stick around for and there is no way of staying.This is a breathtaking piece of writing. It is a story that is like no other. The closest comparison I can make for anyone who wants one is to The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. Even then, it really does not prepare you for “A”’s life. Rhiannon becomes “A”’s reason for existence – a beautiful, sensitive and unattainable. In his pursuit of her, all his rules for living in other people are cast to the wind and he becomes increasingly careless with the lives of those he inhabits – with some dire consequences. “A” is wise and world-weary, but not as worldly as he/she imagines. Rhiannon is constantly telling “A” that the real world, the world of those of us who live every day where we are, is more complex than “A” can understand because “A” only experiences life 24 hours at a time, and it is always different, always shifting.Worlds collide and then break apart in this accomplished novel.I was completely swept into “A”’s world, and Rhiannon’s, and I was very pleased that Levithan wrote the ending the way he did (no spoilers here). Antyhing else would have been untrue to the story.A philosophically challenging and mind-bending book. I loved it.more
I have very mixed feelings about this book. It says some very good things about acceptance, sexuality, and gender identity. It also says some very bad things about how to pursue a love interest. Every morning, A wakes up in the body of a different person, able to access their memories but not their emotions or consciousness. (Note: though A has no gender and inhabits both male and female bodies with equal ease, I will use male pronouns to make typing less cumbersome.) The body is always roughly his same age, and he lives in it only until midnight before moving on. (Though the switch happens at midnight, A always wakes up the next morning, implying that these kids never stay up past midnight or something.) He has no control over these switches, and mostly acts in order to make as little impact on the body's life as possible - until one day when he inhabits the body of Justin, boyfriend of Rhiannon. A falls in love with Rhiannon, becomes convinced that she loves him too, and turns the lives of his subsequent hosts upside-down in his attempts to win her over, pretty much stalking her until she gives in. A few times I wanted to shout at A, "Just leave her alone already!" It was like A was completely incapable of having a conversation with Rhiannon that didn't focus on his love for her and how Justin wasn't good enough for her and blah blah blah. Yes, I know that teenagers are obsessive like that, but it got kind of tiresome. I wish the story had done more with Nathan and the Reverend, exploring the science fiction side of A's existence as a wandering soul, but its narrow focus on the complicated romance rarely wavered. On the bright side, the writing was superb, and A's experiences in so many different kinds of lives (from drug addict to immigrant house cleaner to transgendered person) were compelling, believable, and memorable. I also did really appreciate A's views of gender identity and unconditional love, and Rhiannon's reactions were quite realistic. Yes, there are people out there who could fall in love with someone who looked completely different every single day, but could you? The ending was dissatisfying, though I suppose it was good that A finally appeared to mature a little bit, even if he still couldn't seem to muster any respect for his host bodies. I kind of hope there's a sequel, if only to explore the premise a bit more and lay off the teen romance a tad.more
Don't worry, you'll be enraptured by this book too (which was introduced to me by my fellow teen librarians who gave it a Mock Printz Award). You'll voraciously read it wanting to know how it will all work out. The romance is great but not overbearing, and it's realistic. The fantasy-twist to the main character keeps it all very interesting and exciting. But remember, this is a "realistic" romance, even if the fact the main character switches to another person's body every day. Anyone watch anime? If you do, you know how the endings often suck. Yup. This book has an anime ending. To quote Hitomi after finally getting to be with Van: "I'll never forget you, even when I'm old!" Eff you, stupid endings. Eff you. But despite that, I still give this 5 stars. Totes read it.more
This is a very unusual read. I tried to imagine myself switching bodies every day as I read the book. My daughter gave this book to me and I liked it very much.more
I don't normally like Levithan's individual efforts as much as his fans do (although I generally like his co-written novels quite well) but this one is well worth the read. It's quick, it has an interesting premise, and offers much to think about/debate. Would pair well with AM Jenkins Repossessed. Would make a great book for book groups. I particularly liked this thought/description by A, the book's narrator, about one of the people whose body he wakes up in: "Living within the definition of his own truth, just like me. He knows who he wants to be. Most people our age don't have to do that. They stay within the realm of the easy. If you want to live within the definition of your truth, you have to choose to go through the initially painful and ultimately comforting process of finding it." I would argue the "process" is not necessarily age-specific and it never has to end . . .more
There are books, and then sometimes there are books. And, Every Day, my friends? Is a book. It's a story that I guarantee (for most) won't leave you. Ever.Every day A wakes up as a new person. A lives their life with the goal of just making it through the day going unnoticed, making sure the person's life A is borrowing goes as smoothly as possible. And then there's Rhiannon. She makes A want to break the rules. A starts to disrupt the lives of people he lives as to see her and be with her. And then A makes a mistake. He left his email connected to a computer of one of the people he lived as. Using A's email, Nathan makes it his goal to find and expose A to the public. Between A's developing feelings for Rhiannon, and dealing with Nathan's accusations, A has a mess to deal with. A has to suss out what's right and wrong, and ultimately what's fair for not only himself, but for each new life he controls the next day.I put off writing a review for this book for so long for a few reasons. Mainly it has been really hard to put in to words how I feel about this book. Obviously, for the most part, it's all positive. This book makes you consider who you are as a person, and what makes the person, without gender binaries strictly guiding one's life. Once you've stripped someone of their strict gender identity, what's left? What makes a person? This is just one of the bigger questions I considered while reading this novel. Who is A? A is a culmination of every person A has ever lived as, taking bits and pieces of them, while striving to be a separate entity. A may live as another person, but A is still an individual being with thoughts, feelings, and emotions.As for characters (because I'm a character-driven reader) I have to say I really loved A (as if my last paragraph didn't show that enough). To make my life easier I'm going to call A a "he" -- I know this is sort of a cop-out since A is genderless... but it'll make writing this review a little easier. I enjoy A's insight, and how he handles the different challenges that are thrown his way. You experience the story through A's eyes (so... same mind, but different eyes each day). You get to see other people's lives form an outsider's perspective as he's forced to be an insider. It's just... fascinating. Some people complain that you're supposed to just automatically feel bad for A, and ignore the fact that he's taking over other people's lives. I don't think that's true. A makes you think about the people he "takes over" for a day as well, sometimes in quite a lot of depth. While reading I did feel bad for A, but I also felt bad for the people that lose a day of their lives. I think A does a good job in regards to thinking people he "invades," and does his best to make it as easy as possible for them. And then there's Rhiannon. I really wanted to like her a lot... but it's difficult. I felt she was developed okay, and for all intents and purposes as a character she does what she's supposed to do. I guess if anything I liked that she didn't necessarily just jump in to everything... but at the same time I found her kind of dull, and at times I had a hard time figuring out why A was so enamored with her (so I guess it's good that the book was from A's perspective because I'm not so sure how I'd fare if it had been from Rhiannon's). There were times that I really wanted to shake her (mostly in regards to her thought processes and how she dealt with A). But ultimately? She's human, and I think her role in the novel was done well -- all her actions and thoughts accurately reflected how I think many would feel if they were in her situation.In the end I really loved this novel. It made me question what it means to be human, let alone a ton of other things too. I thought it was beautifully written, and ultimately just wonderful. I was recommending this book to a bunch of my friends before I had even finished it (which says a lot, at least for me, really). This book will pull at your heart strings and make you question. And that makes it a great book, in my opinion. (Warning, if you're like me, you'll probably need some tissues along the way... tears did happen.)more
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live someone else's life, even if only for a day? A has never lived any other way, being transported into someone new's life every day, never to return to the same person twice. Exactly why or where A originated is a mystery. All that A knows is that's always how its been.On one particular day, A is living the life of a 16 year old boy, and not a particularly nice or remarkable boy at that. The boy's girlfriend, however, is another matter--A feels a connection with her and as the days pass, as A becomes other people, A cannot stop thinking of her. Suddenly A's rules to avoid getting attached, to never interfere and to avoid getting noticed fly out the window. A will do anything to see her again and seeks out a way for them to be together.I cannot tell you how much I loved this book. David Levithan had me at the first line of the novel, and I really really really did not want to see it end. Over the course of the book, A jumps into the lives of several different people, each one unique and with their own flaws and issues. For the most part, A tries to navigate the people's lives so as not to cause any damage or make life altering changes. A has a good heart ultimately, and it comes across in A's dealing with a suicidal girl and a drug addict. A gets sloppy, however, as A's efforts to spend time with Rhiannon becomes a priority. It really is no wonder A falls for Rhiannon. She is kind and thoughtful, sometimes confident while other times being much more timid, especially where her boyfriend, Justin, is concerned. She isn't sure she can love someone like A--someone who changes appearances every day, one day being a boy and the other being a girl. Do appearances matter? Does gender matter? Or is it the person within the body that we fall in love with?Then there is Nathan who remembers bits and pieces of A's presence in his life. He struck me as a lonely young man. I felt sorry for him more than upset with him as he sought out answers for what happened, flinging accusations and crying devil. I can't help but wonder where he is now, what happened to him, and if he is okay.Every Day is funny and sad; it is tragic and romantic; and it is a must read. The ending will put off some readers, those who like everything wrapped up neatly in the end and tied with a bow. I, however, thought the ending was perfect--very fitting given the story. David Levithan is a great storyteller and I will definitely be reading more by him in the future.more
An excellent, thoughtful reading experience, better than many YA novels about love and relationships and embracing diversity. Started reading and didn't put it down until I'd read the entire book.more
Following is just a collection of things I wrote or copied down as I read this one...still not entirely sure how I felt about it. It's fascinating, and has so much to offer to a book discussion (which IS happening!), yet I felt strangely removed from the whole story, which may have been intentional. Of note, though: while we experience a multitude of lives with A, his/her situation is such that there's not a huge impact with the really devastating ones. Most often, it's a horrible situation to be endured for a day, then forgotten, with the exception of the girl struggling with depression. That, incidentally, was one of the best descriptions of what depression feels like, as pointed out by a coworker of mine.****A lives in the moment, lives day-to-day, and yet is unhappy. So much advice urges you to 'forget the past', but this ensures that A makes no connections to anyone. "After awhile you have to be at peace with the fact that you simply are. There is no way to know why." Pg 2"Some people think mental illness is a matter of mood, a matter of personality. They think depression is simply a form of being sad, that OCD is a form of being uptight. They think the soul is sick, not the body. It is, they believe, something that you have some choice over. I know how wrong this is." Pg 119. "It is a hard cycle to conquer. The body is working against you. And because if this, you feel even more despair. Which only amplifies the unbalance." pg 119"I have to keep reminding myself - this is not me. It is chemistry. It is biology. It is not who i am. It is not who any of them are." Pg 120"Not getting what you want can make you cruel." Pg 187 IdentityEthicsGenderLoveResponsibilityBelonging@Kearsten: @MeriJenBen No, actually. I felt weirdly removed, which may have been intentional? Like I was a guest in A's life as A was in others'.more
Well for me this was a fantastic way to wrap up some of 2012- I loved this book~ What an original idea* This book was hard to put down and I flew through it in three sittings. There were some sad moments and laugh out loud moments. Great Characters*** This book would be perfect for a gift for Christmas- for anyone to read. I'm glad I had a chance to read Every Day! This is my first book by David Levithan and won't be my last.... Overall this book was Perfect and worth the read and has taken the number on spot for 2012. If you have not read Every Day I highly recommend that you do :)more
I’ve always liked David Levithan’s books. He is very creative in his writing and this book is no exception. The book is romance and there are some important messages about love to be found, but I also think the book is about not taking for granted what you have. Imagine living a new life every day. As A can do, you can see life as a whole, see patterns between people and families, and see the commonalities more than the differences. But A also misses out on so much more by not being able to stay in a body for longer than a day. I feel very bad for A. The one thing the book doesn’t explain is why this is happening to A. But I feel that the book doesn’t necessarily need an answer either. However if there was ever a sequel to this book I’d snatch it up in a minute. In lieu of that I will just have to go read more by Levithan. I recommend his books to anyone.more
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Reviews

This is a riveting, well-paced, inventive story. It goes on my short list of modern YA fiction I'd recommend for classroom discussions or book club reading. There are SO MANY topics introduced which should engage young people and help them examine their predjudices and attitudes. Highly recommended.more
A is a 16 year old who wakes up in the body of a different teenager of similar age and geography every day. Since this has been going on for as long as A can remember, A has adjusted and for the most part moves through life reading, playing video games, and trying not to have too big of an effect on those whose lives A occupies. That is, until A meets Rhiannon and everything changes.One can't help but root for A as they deal with all of the trappings of first love with the additional unusual problems that accompanies A's peculiar circumstances. Every Day provides an excellent consideration of identity and authenticity, which we all begin to deal with around that time in our lives. My reading of this public library book was colored by the fact that a teenager had read and annotated the book entirely through the lens of some kind of personal love triangle happening in her life between herself, her best friend/crush, and her present boy friend. She underlined all of the passages in the book about love (a fair amount), sometimes making notes about which of the young men to which each pertained. At the end she wrote in a dramatic, "Good Bye, Wes." I suppose we always bring our own experiences to bear as we read fiction, but it was very interesting (and occasionally exasperating) to read this particular story of teenage love and angst through the lens of another's love triangle.more
Interesting premise. The theme is perspective-taking. Fantasy.more
In this fun Young Adult novel, a sixteen year old young man wakes up every day in a different sixteen year old body - sometimes a young man, sometimes a young woman, sometimes straight, sometimes queer, sometimes hot, sometimes not. Each day he finds himself with new parents, a new house, new siblings - an entirely new reality, somewhere in Maryland. He has both the memories and understanding of his borrowed person for a day, and those of his own perpetually reincarnating self.

The protagonist's situation is a lot like being sixteen years old, and struggling to discover who you really are in a shape shifting growing body/self. The book grabbed me right away with its premise and sparkly writing. When the protagonist meets a special young woman and seeks to prolong his relationship with her in spite of having a new body in a different town each day... a fine YA novel ensues. I enjoyed it.

Thankfully, the author offers no explanation for this strange phenomenon - that's just the way it is in this world. Whether or not there is a way out of the gilgul is something that is left for the last pages, and comes in a satisfyingly unexpected form.

I would characterize this as a romantic adventure written for young men, from a young man's point of view. I am not an expert on YA fiction, but I think that this male perspective makes it somewhat unusual within the romantic adventure genre. While readable and enjoyable by either gender, obviously, and while very exploratory with gay, lesbian, transgender and straight characters, on balance the protagonist's heterosexual love interest and young male perspective are at the center of the novel.

I almost think my almost sixteen year old son would enjoy it. It certainly captures a lot about how emerging sexualty and love and relationships and parents and friends feel at that age.

I recommend it for actual sixteen year olds and former sixteen year olds who would like to re-experience what it was like to live in a body so new they barely knew it at all.

~

Fun Questions Raised by Every Day

Does love outlast the body? Is love always embodied?

How much of a person is inside of him/her, and how much is carried, held, by all the people around him/her?

If you were inside of your love's brain/soul, would your love be there too? Or would that get a little crowded?

What would you remember, and what would your love remember of inhabiting the same body, once you no longer did? How would that morning after conversation go?

Could you sustain a relationship with a unified person who serially inhabited arbitrary, (although age constant?!) bodies? (And how many realities is THAT a metaphor for?)

Could you recognize your love if he or she approached you clothed in a completely different body? (Heh heh, a fine excuse: "That WASN'T you last night? I was sure I recognized the glint in your eyes. I see. You were waiting for me to come home. Well, this IS embarrassing.")

All these implicit questions and more, from a mere YA novel...more
"A" is a 16-year-old who, for as long as he/she (doesn't identify with one gender or another) can remember, has woken in the body of a different person each day. The person whose body A inhabits for a 24-hour period is always the same general age and lives in a geographic area of about a 100 mile radius, but other than those parameters, A might wake up as a male, female, gay, straight, Asian, Latino, Caucasian, Black, in a myriad of functional and dysfunctional family situations. A has gotten used to the lack of connectivity with others that this allows-- until s/he meets Rhiannon. When s/he inhabits the body of Rhiannon's loser boyfriend Justin for a day, s/he is smitten, and can't get her out of his/her head or heart. As A inhabits other teens, s/he keeps finding excuses to meet Rhiannon again, until finally s/he tells Rhiannon his/her secret. At first, Rhiannon doesn't believe it, but she is convinced over time and must then come to terms with whether she can love someone strictly for what's on the inside, when the outside changes every day.

Levithan does a marvelous job with the voices of his characters (including the varied ones whom A becomes for a day), and with the thought-provoking situations that arise as A moves from one body to another. When one of the teens, Nathan, realizes that he has been "inhabited" and claims that Satan possessed his body, it quickly makes the news, and a preacher who is overly interested in Nathan's story turns out to play an important part in the decisions that A and Rhiannon ultimately reach.more
picked this book up from the library on a whim. I volunteer there twice a week, so I spend a lot of time walking past books, and this one caught my eye. The author wrote another book that a friend of mine has been telling me to read and the summary on the back sounded good, so I borrowed it. I was glad I did because even though it is a “young adult” book and a quick read, I enjoyed it.The premise of Every Day is that the protagonist, a 16 year old who has taken the name A, wakes up in a new body (of zir own age) every day. Ze (ze is a gender neutral pronoun) can “access” the host body’s memories and generally tries to go about zirs day without disrupting the life of the body’s owner. A’s life has been like this for as long as ze can remember. Furthermore, A has no idea why or how this happens, just that it does. A also doesn’t know what zir original body is: boy or girl, straight or gay. A has experienced all types of genders and doesn’t feel anymore at home in one type of body than another. Each chapter of Every Day tells us what day A is on. The book opens with day 5994 with A inhabiting a boy named Justin. This leads A to Rihannon, Justin’s girlfriend, with whom ze immediately falls in love. On that day, A breaks zirs own rules and disrupts Justin’s life, skipping class with Rihannon to drive to the beach and get to know each other. The next day, A is desperate to meet Rihannon again. Luckily, A seems to stay within a relatively small geographical area so on any given day our protagonist isn’t too far away from the love interest. The book chronicles A’s efforts to meet her and get her to see A’s inner self, apart from the physical trappings. They deal with issues of attraction and sexuality and try to figure out what it means to be with someone who is a different person every day.I felt that it had some strong themes that would be good for teenagers who are still trying to figure out who they are. Feeling like you’re a totally different person every day is not uncommon for a lot of teenagers (or, let’s be real, 20-somethings) and Every Day plays with that concept quite literally. At one point, A tells the reader, “Part of growing up is making sure your sense of reality isn’t entirely grounded in your own mind” and I have to agree. You can always spot the mature children based on how aware they are of things that go on that have nothing to do with them. And from a perspective of advanced reality-awareness, being able to navigate the world around you without basing all your decision on your immediate feelings or hormone situation really is the secret to being a level-headed adult.Another identity-related theme is our protagonists attitudes about sexuality. I know that not everyone is going to agree with this sentiment, but there is a part in the book where A expresses that zir preferences aren’t based on what sex organs people have, but on the person as an individual. Or, as I like to put it: love the person, not the parts. Again, I know that not everyone will feel this way, but I feel like for young LGBTQI (especially for the “questioning” part), the message that it’s not a big deal which gender the people you like are is an important one. It’s okay to just like people for themselves and not based on your considerations of how to have sex.As a practically inevitable counterpoint to A’s genderless attraction preferences, ze is thrown into contact with some people who strongly disagree with those ideas. A ruminates on the family of one boy whose body he inhabits; the children are homeschooled in the extreme Christian way (not the cool, learn what you want and experience life way) and the mother goes berzerk when he catches her son (so it seems) kissing a girl–the beloved Rihannon. A remarks on the lecture ze received about “the sins of the flesh” and comments, “I want to tell [the mother] that ‘sins of the flesh’ is just a control mechanism–if you demonize a person’s pleasure, then you can control his or her life.” Speaking as an ex-Mormon, I find this to be totally true. Control of one’s sexuality is an all too common tactic that religions use to keep people down. Even though A feels this way, ze also expresses a lot of empathy for people who go to church. As a by product of zir life, A has been to all kinds of religious services. A emphasizes to the reader that religions have about 98% in common, and it’s that other 2% that everyone wants to focus on. Even though I am not a religious person, I liked that bit of perspective. It is a good point and I think that we do focus on the differences when we disagree with someone, rather than on the vast amounts we might have in common. And that’s really the point of Every Day. A wants us to focus on the commonalities of human experience as a way to come together, rather than dwell on the minute differences and let ourselves be dragged apart.As a fan of science fiction and fantasy, I enjoyed the premise (a new body every day), but I did want there to be more to it. Of course, that would make it a dedicated genre novel, rather than more of a YA work. The way I see it, there are two ways to interpret A’s condition: either ze is some kind of “soul” that isn’t linked to a body, or A body swaps every day, with the essence of the host body going to A’s body somewhere. Based on A’s description of how the mind of zir host works (the host seems to remember the day how A wants him/her to remember it, A can access memories of the host’s life), the latter interpretation seems unlikely; however, it is the better launching point for telling an alternate perspective of this story. Imagine, A’s body somewhere waking up everyday confused and alarmed. Parents come in and ask “What’s wrong, Liam?” (or whatever A’s possible “real” name is). The guest consciousness panics, “Liam? Who’s Liam? My name is Ashley. Wait … who are you and WHERE AM I?” You’d get various levels of hysteria from different personalities. Frustrated, Liam’s parents seek professional help, seeing a new doctor every week it seems like. Every day, Liam is someone else and the people are so detailed. Liam is so young, where does he get these ideas? Even worse, Liam never recognizes his parents. Eventually, unable to cope, Liam’s parents send him to a psychiatric institution. Every day, the psych tech wakes Liam up and sometimes she’s frustrated and sometimes she laughs at him. He sees the doctors who ask, “Who are you today?” Every day, Liam is someone new. I think that is a story that would be fun to write, perhaps I will look into that, although it’s likely that the premise has been used before. Even though Every Day didn’t delve deep into the genre stuff, I still liked the system created around A’s talent, if you will. It was consistent and it was interesting. This book might be disappointing if you’re looking for serious science fiction or fantasy, but if you think the premise sounds interesting and you like young adult literature, you will probably enjoy this book.------------------------To comment or read more reviews, visit digitalmanticore.commore
One thing I love about Levithan's work is how unique it is. I can't imagine how daunting creating a different physical character with a different life for every day that A has to inhibit that person's life and still make a continuous narrative that overlays on those other stories. The structure highlights just how much of our personality and the life we create is individual and universal.
Levithan also is not afraid to tackle some BIG topics, like identity, gender, personal responsibility, love, attraction. For other authors it would be too much, but Levithan is great with incorporating these elements without overwhelming the reader.
I also appreciate that he doesn't try to wrap up his stories in pretty bows. He leaves things ambiguous and open which as a reader can be frustrating but it more authentic, especially in this kind of story.
Not my favorite of his but still incredibly well written and unique read.more
I didn't have a lot of time to finish this before book club. I had today off, and I figured I'd be able to make a sizable dent in it, because people had told me it was a quick read. Well, I ended up finishing it in just a few hours.

I really liked it. It was a fascinating concept - can you love someone who is a different person (on the outside) every single day? I really liked the way the author set about answering that question, and I liked the answer that he came to. I thought the book ended just the way it should. And he also raised a lot of other interesting issues about physical appearance, gender, sexuality, family, the way we treat others, and the meaning of a life.more
Fascinating, fascinating concept. And utterly lonely. Think about it: you are not anchored by anything or anyone. You are an island. Anytime you make friends, they are gone the next day. Anytime you react to something, all other people will think it is the body's owner reacting. A tragedy. Truly.

As usual, Every Day is gorgeously written by Levithan. And he invokes fascinating thoughts about gender, sexuality, drug addiction, what is good, how much a person should interfere, etc., etc. But the larger question is how much should A get to own his life.

What I most applaud about this book are the boundaries Levithan set up for A's "ability." There are rules to what happens when the clock strikes midnight. And Levithan acknowledges and plays along with these rules - as he should. A is old enough to have figured some things out. It would be almost inexcusable if A didn't have SOME answers about what happens to him. But A has also figured out how to mess with the rules. And I think that's also great. And wonderful. The fact he has an email account delights me.

When it comes to the bigger questions Levithan asks about A's interference into the lives of others and religion and whether there are others like A out there, it's pretty nebulous. I expect it will invoke some strong opinions one way or the other.

All in all, a great book - gorgeously written, strong characters, fast-paced plot. The best part, though, was how many different questions and thoughts it generated in ME. Meaning it probably would make a fascinated book for an (open minded and awesome) book club.more
I wasn't sure I was going to like this but it was so much better than the last book I read with this premise and I really did like it.more
I liked Quantum Leap many years ago and this has a similar concept so I thought that it would be fun to read. So disappointed! I didn't like the ending at all and felt that the author was trying to push the gay agenda in an overly preachy way. I also didn't think the characters were very well-developed. I guess having A change bodies every day made that more difficult but that made the character development feel flat and lifeless.more
Every Day chronicles the life of sixteen-year-old A, who wakes up each morning in a different person's body. A does his best to respect each person's life, going along with their daily schedule until he meets, and immediately falls in love with, a young girl named Rhiannon. Suddenly, A has to decide how to maintain his body's normal life and get the attention of the girl he loves.

This novel is well written and has a unique premise, but is rather heavy-handed when dealing with its message. There are great sections that move through A's feelings towards Rhiannon and really capture the emotional intensity of incipient love. However, there were other sections that did little to progress the plot or develop the characters and served mostly just to reiterate the idea that lifestyles of any race, gender, or sexuality should be accepted. Now, as far as messages are concerned, this is certainly a good one, but its always preferable if an author lets the story develop its message naturally instead of hammering it into its readers.

The book also jumped the gun slightly on starting its love story. It felt almost like Levithan didn't realize just how unique and interesting his premise was, so, rather than providing a couple chapters to introduce the complexities of A's life, he dove straight into the love story in the first chapter.

But, criticisms out of the way, this is not a book that anyone will regret reading. It is entertaining and captivating, and provides an appealing, creative view of every day life (even if it doesn't flesh itself out as much as it could).

In the end, this book is a fun, interesting, and easy read even though it doesn't entirely reach its potential.more
Oh my goodness. This is beautiful and so cleverly done. Shades of the time traveller's wife, teens and adults will love this.more
My aunt and I recently went to the 2012 National Book Festival in DC, and during the trip, I talked to her about the authors I wanted to see. I mentioned David Levithan and that I had just started to read Every Day. My aunt said, “Oh, it sounds interesting. I’ll have to check it out.” And I replied, “The premise should not logistically work but oh my god it does and it’s brilliant.” Yes, there were moments when my brain stopped to ask how this should actually work, but it’s just so well done, I kicked my brain and carried on.

And to be fair, I did knock the premise of the book at first, mostly because I’m a little tired of “My life is mundane (even by fantastical standards) but LO I HAVE MET [LOVE INTEREST] AND MY LIFE IS CHANGED SUNSHINE SPARKLES AND RAINBOWS.” But when it’s well-done, I can roll with it, and that is exactly what Levithan does. I liked that A has questioned the implications of what they do even if they don’t really influence the actions of the person they’re inhibiting at the moment. (Note: It is really hard not to describe A with specific gender pronouns. Just saying.) I also loved that A’s had to grapple with the fact that they don’t get a ‘tomorrow’ before, and that meeting Rhiannon just brings that idea up again. And I loved that the whole conflict is summed up so perfectly by using a line from “Running Up That Hill” (a song I love btw) and it just fits so well into the whole book and such a fantastic metaphor.

A could have been a frustrating character in that they don’t really have a set personality—not that A takes on the full personality whatever person they’re inhibiting, but A doesn’t really define themselves by being just one thing. I liked that even though a large part of A’s development is that they can make a difference in the lives they inhibit, particularly with Kelsea, but it never feels too preachy or overstated. I liked that A generally does accept the bodies they wake up in and just rolls with the punches. The only time I had an issue with that is when A wakes up in the body of an overweight boy and freaks out about “Omg I’m so disgusting I can’t let Rhiannon see me like this” and that whole day comes off as pitying that boy. It felt a little too fat-shaming to me. But I did like that A has to deal with the physical and mental problems of each person they inhibit—the whole day with Kelsea being my standout. It takes a lot to deal with that kind of depression and just how A and Rhiannon deal with it…heart-breaking. I loved that A gets confronted with their own perception of how people can be. This shows up more whenever A confronts Rhiannon about how her boyfriend treats her, and Rhiannon flat-out says that A’s got a biased perception of the situation.

I really liked Rhiannon. She felt like a normal girl, not a free spirit or a popular person or emo kid, just normal. And she’s caught in between a boyfriend with whom all the passion has kinda dimmed and some kid who’s experiencing new things every day. I liked that she genuinely cares about people, like when she checks up on some of the other teens A’s gone into to see if they’re doing all right. I even liked that she still loves Justin and calls A out on their biased opinion of Justin being a douchebag. (Well, Justin is but not all the time. That definitely felt realistic.) Rhiannon could have been too goody-two-shoes Mary Sue, but she never falls into that role.

And from what we did get of the other kids, I really liked them. Loved Nathan—he’s not the only one A uses in order to see Rhiannon, but he’s the one who gets the brunt of the effects. And I liked that he’s pissed off about it, and does confront A about what happened. Nathan’s reasoning of what happened feels a little too fantastical, but it felt like a logical leaped conclusion, and I also liked that even Nathan has to reconcile his ideas of what happened that day with A’s reasons. I loved the little glimpses we got into everyone’s lives, even if we never got the sense of their personalities. It’s especially interesting when A runs into their previous bodies and gets to see the reactions to their missing days. And I liked that there’s a hint that A isn’t the only person who jumps. It’s not brought out in too much detail, but I liked that we got to see that A isn’t an anomaly.

This is a book that could have failed if anyone else had written it, if the focus was too narrow (see my aforementioned misgiving), if A was too bland or too snarky or had too much personality—there’s a lot of what ifs. But Levithan manages to take a premise that’s complicated and raises too many questions and turns it into this beautiful novel and just…I can’t say enough. Definitely one of the best books I’ve read this year.
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A Quantum-Leap-esque main character, but with some differences. He's been doing it since birth, so "he" isn't even a he - he feels equally at home as a boy and as a girl. He always inhabits bodies of kids about the same age he would be. He doesn't time travel, or jump around in space too much (a few hours away maybe).

Levithan uses this young narrator as a way to explore medical issues, mental illness, obesity, and the fundamental ways we connect with one another.

So good. I expected the ending, but in a way, didn't... but I won't talk about that here. ;)more
Due to copy and paste, formatting has been lost.I feel like Every Day was written just for people who are romantic. People want to believe in true love, along with loving the same person even when they're in different bodies. What's my problem with that, you ask? Nothing. I want to believe it too. But I had a hard time believing it in this book. Our main characters, A and Rhiannon, simply fell in love way too fast. Page 22, first day meeting each other for A, and 5 days later for Rhiannon. I do not believe in love at first site, so that was a little off the grid for me.Rhiannon was a little off the grid for me too. She seems nice and fun, but she doesn't have enough development as a character to really work for me. Neither does A, in a sense.However, I was willing to play along with that. And I learned that A is apparently not a teenager, because no teen that I know talks metaphorically. He (I say he) thinks philosophers' thoughts, which makes him kind of unbelievable. I just have issues with that kind of telling, because no teenager says things like that! At least, none I know.Which brings me to my third point-- we get to see so many different lives, and yet it's not like we're experiencing it. It's like we're being told about all the things going on. I never really felt like I could get immersed in the story, which was unfortunate. It kept me reading, though. I did really want to know what happened, because the premise was just so unique!I feel like the ending was perfect. It all worked out so fantastically, which makes me oh-so-happy! I was really afraid that A was going to do something stupid, but it turns out that he didn't, so yay! It all worked out, even if it wasn't exactly the way that I expected.All in all, I enjoyed Every Day, but I expected a little more.more
This book will break your heart. This book will get you excited about writing. This book will make you want to stop writing because you will never write this well.“A” exists in a life that we cannot imagine. Every morning, “A” wakes up in a different person’s body. “A” lives a different life every day. Never knowing where it will be or who it will be. Sometimes “A” is female, sometimes male. Fat, thin, a-grade student, drug addict, nerd, jock, goth, happy, depressed, abused, loved. Whatever comes “A”’s way there are rules to live by. Then “A” meets Rhiannon while in the body of her boyfriend Justin and in an instant everything changes.All of a sudden, “A” is attached. “A” continues to have contact with her after he has moved on – against all the rules. For the first time “A” has found someone to stick around for and there is no way of staying.This is a breathtaking piece of writing. It is a story that is like no other. The closest comparison I can make for anyone who wants one is to The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. Even then, it really does not prepare you for “A”’s life. Rhiannon becomes “A”’s reason for existence – a beautiful, sensitive and unattainable. In his pursuit of her, all his rules for living in other people are cast to the wind and he becomes increasingly careless with the lives of those he inhabits – with some dire consequences. “A” is wise and world-weary, but not as worldly as he/she imagines. Rhiannon is constantly telling “A” that the real world, the world of those of us who live every day where we are, is more complex than “A” can understand because “A” only experiences life 24 hours at a time, and it is always different, always shifting.Worlds collide and then break apart in this accomplished novel.I was completely swept into “A”’s world, and Rhiannon’s, and I was very pleased that Levithan wrote the ending the way he did (no spoilers here). Antyhing else would have been untrue to the story.A philosophically challenging and mind-bending book. I loved it.more
I have very mixed feelings about this book. It says some very good things about acceptance, sexuality, and gender identity. It also says some very bad things about how to pursue a love interest. Every morning, A wakes up in the body of a different person, able to access their memories but not their emotions or consciousness. (Note: though A has no gender and inhabits both male and female bodies with equal ease, I will use male pronouns to make typing less cumbersome.) The body is always roughly his same age, and he lives in it only until midnight before moving on. (Though the switch happens at midnight, A always wakes up the next morning, implying that these kids never stay up past midnight or something.) He has no control over these switches, and mostly acts in order to make as little impact on the body's life as possible - until one day when he inhabits the body of Justin, boyfriend of Rhiannon. A falls in love with Rhiannon, becomes convinced that she loves him too, and turns the lives of his subsequent hosts upside-down in his attempts to win her over, pretty much stalking her until she gives in. A few times I wanted to shout at A, "Just leave her alone already!" It was like A was completely incapable of having a conversation with Rhiannon that didn't focus on his love for her and how Justin wasn't good enough for her and blah blah blah. Yes, I know that teenagers are obsessive like that, but it got kind of tiresome. I wish the story had done more with Nathan and the Reverend, exploring the science fiction side of A's existence as a wandering soul, but its narrow focus on the complicated romance rarely wavered. On the bright side, the writing was superb, and A's experiences in so many different kinds of lives (from drug addict to immigrant house cleaner to transgendered person) were compelling, believable, and memorable. I also did really appreciate A's views of gender identity and unconditional love, and Rhiannon's reactions were quite realistic. Yes, there are people out there who could fall in love with someone who looked completely different every single day, but could you? The ending was dissatisfying, though I suppose it was good that A finally appeared to mature a little bit, even if he still couldn't seem to muster any respect for his host bodies. I kind of hope there's a sequel, if only to explore the premise a bit more and lay off the teen romance a tad.more
Don't worry, you'll be enraptured by this book too (which was introduced to me by my fellow teen librarians who gave it a Mock Printz Award). You'll voraciously read it wanting to know how it will all work out. The romance is great but not overbearing, and it's realistic. The fantasy-twist to the main character keeps it all very interesting and exciting. But remember, this is a "realistic" romance, even if the fact the main character switches to another person's body every day. Anyone watch anime? If you do, you know how the endings often suck. Yup. This book has an anime ending. To quote Hitomi after finally getting to be with Van: "I'll never forget you, even when I'm old!" Eff you, stupid endings. Eff you. But despite that, I still give this 5 stars. Totes read it.more
This is a very unusual read. I tried to imagine myself switching bodies every day as I read the book. My daughter gave this book to me and I liked it very much.more
I don't normally like Levithan's individual efforts as much as his fans do (although I generally like his co-written novels quite well) but this one is well worth the read. It's quick, it has an interesting premise, and offers much to think about/debate. Would pair well with AM Jenkins Repossessed. Would make a great book for book groups. I particularly liked this thought/description by A, the book's narrator, about one of the people whose body he wakes up in: "Living within the definition of his own truth, just like me. He knows who he wants to be. Most people our age don't have to do that. They stay within the realm of the easy. If you want to live within the definition of your truth, you have to choose to go through the initially painful and ultimately comforting process of finding it." I would argue the "process" is not necessarily age-specific and it never has to end . . .more
There are books, and then sometimes there are books. And, Every Day, my friends? Is a book. It's a story that I guarantee (for most) won't leave you. Ever.Every day A wakes up as a new person. A lives their life with the goal of just making it through the day going unnoticed, making sure the person's life A is borrowing goes as smoothly as possible. And then there's Rhiannon. She makes A want to break the rules. A starts to disrupt the lives of people he lives as to see her and be with her. And then A makes a mistake. He left his email connected to a computer of one of the people he lived as. Using A's email, Nathan makes it his goal to find and expose A to the public. Between A's developing feelings for Rhiannon, and dealing with Nathan's accusations, A has a mess to deal with. A has to suss out what's right and wrong, and ultimately what's fair for not only himself, but for each new life he controls the next day.I put off writing a review for this book for so long for a few reasons. Mainly it has been really hard to put in to words how I feel about this book. Obviously, for the most part, it's all positive. This book makes you consider who you are as a person, and what makes the person, without gender binaries strictly guiding one's life. Once you've stripped someone of their strict gender identity, what's left? What makes a person? This is just one of the bigger questions I considered while reading this novel. Who is A? A is a culmination of every person A has ever lived as, taking bits and pieces of them, while striving to be a separate entity. A may live as another person, but A is still an individual being with thoughts, feelings, and emotions.As for characters (because I'm a character-driven reader) I have to say I really loved A (as if my last paragraph didn't show that enough). To make my life easier I'm going to call A a "he" -- I know this is sort of a cop-out since A is genderless... but it'll make writing this review a little easier. I enjoy A's insight, and how he handles the different challenges that are thrown his way. You experience the story through A's eyes (so... same mind, but different eyes each day). You get to see other people's lives form an outsider's perspective as he's forced to be an insider. It's just... fascinating. Some people complain that you're supposed to just automatically feel bad for A, and ignore the fact that he's taking over other people's lives. I don't think that's true. A makes you think about the people he "takes over" for a day as well, sometimes in quite a lot of depth. While reading I did feel bad for A, but I also felt bad for the people that lose a day of their lives. I think A does a good job in regards to thinking people he "invades," and does his best to make it as easy as possible for them. And then there's Rhiannon. I really wanted to like her a lot... but it's difficult. I felt she was developed okay, and for all intents and purposes as a character she does what she's supposed to do. I guess if anything I liked that she didn't necessarily just jump in to everything... but at the same time I found her kind of dull, and at times I had a hard time figuring out why A was so enamored with her (so I guess it's good that the book was from A's perspective because I'm not so sure how I'd fare if it had been from Rhiannon's). There were times that I really wanted to shake her (mostly in regards to her thought processes and how she dealt with A). But ultimately? She's human, and I think her role in the novel was done well -- all her actions and thoughts accurately reflected how I think many would feel if they were in her situation.In the end I really loved this novel. It made me question what it means to be human, let alone a ton of other things too. I thought it was beautifully written, and ultimately just wonderful. I was recommending this book to a bunch of my friends before I had even finished it (which says a lot, at least for me, really). This book will pull at your heart strings and make you question. And that makes it a great book, in my opinion. (Warning, if you're like me, you'll probably need some tissues along the way... tears did happen.)more
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live someone else's life, even if only for a day? A has never lived any other way, being transported into someone new's life every day, never to return to the same person twice. Exactly why or where A originated is a mystery. All that A knows is that's always how its been.On one particular day, A is living the life of a 16 year old boy, and not a particularly nice or remarkable boy at that. The boy's girlfriend, however, is another matter--A feels a connection with her and as the days pass, as A becomes other people, A cannot stop thinking of her. Suddenly A's rules to avoid getting attached, to never interfere and to avoid getting noticed fly out the window. A will do anything to see her again and seeks out a way for them to be together.I cannot tell you how much I loved this book. David Levithan had me at the first line of the novel, and I really really really did not want to see it end. Over the course of the book, A jumps into the lives of several different people, each one unique and with their own flaws and issues. For the most part, A tries to navigate the people's lives so as not to cause any damage or make life altering changes. A has a good heart ultimately, and it comes across in A's dealing with a suicidal girl and a drug addict. A gets sloppy, however, as A's efforts to spend time with Rhiannon becomes a priority. It really is no wonder A falls for Rhiannon. She is kind and thoughtful, sometimes confident while other times being much more timid, especially where her boyfriend, Justin, is concerned. She isn't sure she can love someone like A--someone who changes appearances every day, one day being a boy and the other being a girl. Do appearances matter? Does gender matter? Or is it the person within the body that we fall in love with?Then there is Nathan who remembers bits and pieces of A's presence in his life. He struck me as a lonely young man. I felt sorry for him more than upset with him as he sought out answers for what happened, flinging accusations and crying devil. I can't help but wonder where he is now, what happened to him, and if he is okay.Every Day is funny and sad; it is tragic and romantic; and it is a must read. The ending will put off some readers, those who like everything wrapped up neatly in the end and tied with a bow. I, however, thought the ending was perfect--very fitting given the story. David Levithan is a great storyteller and I will definitely be reading more by him in the future.more
An excellent, thoughtful reading experience, better than many YA novels about love and relationships and embracing diversity. Started reading and didn't put it down until I'd read the entire book.more
Following is just a collection of things I wrote or copied down as I read this one...still not entirely sure how I felt about it. It's fascinating, and has so much to offer to a book discussion (which IS happening!), yet I felt strangely removed from the whole story, which may have been intentional. Of note, though: while we experience a multitude of lives with A, his/her situation is such that there's not a huge impact with the really devastating ones. Most often, it's a horrible situation to be endured for a day, then forgotten, with the exception of the girl struggling with depression. That, incidentally, was one of the best descriptions of what depression feels like, as pointed out by a coworker of mine.****A lives in the moment, lives day-to-day, and yet is unhappy. So much advice urges you to 'forget the past', but this ensures that A makes no connections to anyone. "After awhile you have to be at peace with the fact that you simply are. There is no way to know why." Pg 2"Some people think mental illness is a matter of mood, a matter of personality. They think depression is simply a form of being sad, that OCD is a form of being uptight. They think the soul is sick, not the body. It is, they believe, something that you have some choice over. I know how wrong this is." Pg 119. "It is a hard cycle to conquer. The body is working against you. And because if this, you feel even more despair. Which only amplifies the unbalance." pg 119"I have to keep reminding myself - this is not me. It is chemistry. It is biology. It is not who i am. It is not who any of them are." Pg 120"Not getting what you want can make you cruel." Pg 187 IdentityEthicsGenderLoveResponsibilityBelonging@Kearsten: @MeriJenBen No, actually. I felt weirdly removed, which may have been intentional? Like I was a guest in A's life as A was in others'.more
Well for me this was a fantastic way to wrap up some of 2012- I loved this book~ What an original idea* This book was hard to put down and I flew through it in three sittings. There were some sad moments and laugh out loud moments. Great Characters*** This book would be perfect for a gift for Christmas- for anyone to read. I'm glad I had a chance to read Every Day! This is my first book by David Levithan and won't be my last.... Overall this book was Perfect and worth the read and has taken the number on spot for 2012. If you have not read Every Day I highly recommend that you do :)more
I’ve always liked David Levithan’s books. He is very creative in his writing and this book is no exception. The book is romance and there are some important messages about love to be found, but I also think the book is about not taking for granted what you have. Imagine living a new life every day. As A can do, you can see life as a whole, see patterns between people and families, and see the commonalities more than the differences. But A also misses out on so much more by not being able to stay in a body for longer than a day. I feel very bad for A. The one thing the book doesn’t explain is why this is happening to A. But I feel that the book doesn’t necessarily need an answer either. However if there was ever a sequel to this book I’d snatch it up in a minute. In lieu of that I will just have to go read more by Levithan. I recommend his books to anyone.more
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