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From the Publisher

Don't Just Learn Decimals and Percents ...Master Them!

Brimming with fun and educational games and activities, the Magical Math series provides everything you need to know to become a master of mathematics! In each of these books, Lynette Long uses her unique style to help you truly understand mathematical concepts as you play with everyday objects such as playing cards, dice, coins, and paper and pencil.

In Delightful Decimals and Perfect Percents, you'll learn how to read and write decimals, how to change decimals into fractions and percents, and much more. While you play exciting games like the fast-paced Dynamite Decimal Reduction and Here's a Tip, you'll also learn to estimate percentages in your head and even figure out what tip to leave at a restaurant. And with great games like Zeros Exchange, Multiplication War, and Math Review, you'll practice adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing both decimals and percents-- and have fun while you're doing it!

So why wait? Jump right in and find out how easy it is to become a mathematics master!
Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9780471432081
List price: $16.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Delightful Decimals and Perfect Percents by Lynette Long
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

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