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From the Publisher

A practical resource filled with information, tips, and checklists for helping kids with autism

This useful, accessible guide offers teachers and parents a better understanding of children on the autism spectrum and provides them with the kinds of support and intervention they need. Written in an easy-to-read checklist format, the book is filled with up-to-date research, practical advice, and helpful resources on a wide range of topics. The book covers five areas: basic information on autism, checklists for parents, checklists for teachers, effective support strategies, and helpful resources.

Provides vital, accessible information for parents and teachers working with children in the autism spectrum Contains a wealth of useful strategies, information, and resources A volume in the popular Jossey-Bass Checklist series Offers a comprehensive yet affordable resource Kluth is the bestselling author of You're Going to Love This Kid!: Teaching Students with Autism
Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9781118662076
List price: $16.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Autism Checklist by Paula Kluth and John Shouse
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

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