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From the Publisher

From casual to formal, the kimono shape has endured for centuries as an internationally recognized icon of Japanese life and culture. With 18 original designs, each a knitted interpretation of a traditional kimono style, this handbook makes knitting homemade kimonos deceptively easy. Projects are based on rectangular forms that require very little shaping, and are ideal first-garment projects for knitters wanting to venture beyond scarves. Clever details in stitch patterns and edgings, such as the use of silk, linen, and bamboo yarns, add sophistication and elegance to even the simplest designs. The flattering drape and luxurious style of the kimono will appeal to veteran and beginning knitters alike.

Published: F&W, a Content and eCommerce Company on
ISBN: 9781620332184
List price: $19.95
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