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From the Publisher

This book provides the tools you need to raise a child with epilepsy, to support his/her social development, provide effective discipline, and negotiate the educational system.Each stage in your child's life presents unique issues and problems, ranging from finding day care to school programming to driving. This book is organized so that you can go to the information that you need when you need it, returning for updates as your child grows and new issues emerge. In her 20 years of working with children with epilepsy, Dr. Blackburn has been continually impressed by the fact that no two children with epilepsy are the same. Each child and each family has unique needs. Because of this, she works with a team. The unique talents of each team member let the group meet the unique needs of each patient. This book will help you build the resource team for your child. In addition to providing you with basic tools, the book identifies resources, places you can contact, additional materials you can read, and the kinds of professionals that may be in your community to help you and your child. Every parent is busy, and parents of children with epilepsy may be even busier than most. This book has been organized with the busy parent in mind. The first four chapters are a "must read" for every parent. They provide the basic tools for understanding epilepsy, behavior management and school programming. The final chapter summarizes parenting of a child with epilepsy, providing an easy to remember checklist. Issues for parenting a toddler with epilepsy are far different than issues for parenting an adolescent. You can go to the information that you need,when you need it, returning to the book for an update as your child grows and new issues emerge. You can select the section that is important to you in understanding your child, reading the other chapters when you have time and/or want to know more about the brain in general. Childhood epilepsy may provide speed-bumps in the road to adulthood, but it does not have to be a barricade. For 20 years, Dr. Blackburn has helped parents negotiate the speed bumps, creating an owner's manual for their child. Now, she helps you make this journey.";The Basic Tools; Understanding Epilepsy; The Challenges of Living with Epilepsy; Dealing with the Demon at the Dinner Table ; Epilepsy Goes to School; Effects of Focal Epilepsy: A Guide to Brain Organization; The Frontal Lobes; The Temporal Lobes; The Occipital and Parietal Lobes; Changing Challenges; Changing Age; Epilepsy During the First Two Years; Epilepsy in the Preschool Years; Epilepsy in the Elementary School Years; Epilepsy in the Adolescent Years; Some Final Words for Parents; Appendices; Appendix A: Model Individual Education Plan for Children with Epilepsy; Appendix B: Driving and Epilepsy.;"""This book is an excellent reference to recommend to parents of children with epilepsy."" -- Child Neuropsychology ""Growing Up with Epilepsy will appeal to busy parents who want a quick reference guide, [the] basic tools to help their kids through all manner of concerns. An important tool for everyday living."" --The Midwest Book Review""The book was written for parents in easy, comprehensible language. The author does not shirk from using medical terms but always provides a clear and simple explanation for complicated medical or neuropsychological terminology...This book would be a great help to parents of children with epilepsy. The concise format and easy readability should make it an excellent addition to the literature on special parenting needs."" -- Doody's Review"
Published: Demos Health on
ISBN: 9781888799743
List price: $19.95
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