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NEW EDITION, REVISED AND UPDATED

There just isn't enough time for everything on our "To Do" list—and there never will be. Successful people don't try to do everything. They learn to focus on the most important tasks and make sure they get done.

There's an old saying that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing that it's probably the worst thing you'll do all day. Using “eat that frog” as a metaphor for tackling the most challenging task of your day—the one you are most likely to procrastinate on, but also probably the one that can have the greatest positive impact on your life—Eat That Frog! shows you how to zero in on these critical tasks and organize your day. You'll not only get more done faster, but get the right things done.

Bestselling author Brian Tracy cuts to the core of what is vital to effective time management: decision, discipline, and determination. In this fully revised and updated second edition, he provides brand new information on how to keep technology from dominating your time. He details twenty-one practical and doable steps that will help you stop procrastinating and get more of the important tasks done—today!

Topics: Productivity, How-To Guides, Career, and Leadership

Published: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc. on
ISBN: 9781605095332
List price: $15.95
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This book has lots of good ideas for time management and goal setting. Though there wasn't really any new information, it was a really nice refresher. The chapters were pretty short, so I felt like I was making progress every time I picked up this book to read some. I like the idea of "eating the frog" first.

A few years ago, I mentioned this book (based only on what I read about it on Amazon or Barnes & Noble's website) during a short talk I gave at t Junior League board meeting about time management. I remember that the "eat the frog" part made several people chuckle. Now I wish I'd read the book beforehand, especially since I know now that it was a pretty quick read.more
Surprisingly non-awful. The closest thing to a motivational self-help book I want to read. Lots of good practical ideas, and it's short.more
I got to say when i looked as this very small book i was worried that was useless. But actually i read it in one hour and really liked the concise information. It is really a very good little book on ideas to help with procrastinationmore
The book has much good advice, but only when looked at from a high level: don’t procrastinate; don’t perform meaningless tasks, take a long-term view of your life. Tracy get to applying this very common wisdom he reveals his flawed biases. He claims, for example, his system is equally applicable to both professional and private life, when it’s really only helpful to people who work in white collar corporate settings. Here’s his problem: He believes that everyone has the ability to choose what they want to do next, and the problem with most people’s lives is that they routinely choose to perform low-value tasks like responding to emails instead of eating that frog and getting the biggest, ugliest, most high-value task out of the way first thing. Makes sense.This is, however, only helpful to people, like me, whose jobs are filled with so many meaningless tasks that I have the freedom to choose what I want to do next. I can routinely put off eating frogs and although I won’t get ahead in my profession, I won’t necessarily lose my job, either. If I had a real job (e.g., doctor, teacher, car mechanic, homemaker) I wouldn’t have the luxury of choosing what task I do next. Their client dictates it (e.g., I promised to fix their car, the sick person needs comfort, the baby’s diaper needs to be changed). People who have real jobs must routinely submit themselves to the actual needs of others, and have objective standards of performance they must live up to. People with real jobs don’t have the luxury to choose to eat that frog, because their clients constantly give them frogs throughout their workdays. (btw, preparing a spreadsheet or presentation for your boss is not submitting to someone’s needs nor does it have objective quality standards.)Debilitating procrastination only exists when your life is filled with a bunch of meaningless stuff to do. Since most of our white collar jobs are meaningless, this book is great for most people. But even there, encouraging people to master their sinking ships well isn’t really wise advice. In general, people don’t need to eat that frog every day, they need to find jobs where there’s nothing but frogs to eat.The details of his advice shouldn’t be helpful for your family life either since putting your own aspirations and desires first is not the way to live fully in personal relationships. Rather our lives should be directed through submission to the needs of others who come to us in need. (Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.)more
Read for a workshop. Didn't particularly find any new ideas, but they were certainly presented in a memorable way.more
A great simple book that summarizes what you need to do to be productive and successful.more
The basic premise of this book is that you take the least favourite task you have to do in a given day and do it first thing. Get it over with. Quite good advice if you can follow it. There's more similar advice in this book on goal setting, achieving objectives and so on, but it does all feel a bit unoriginal.more
Read it and you`ll see why i rated with 5 stars.more
One of the best book I've ever read!more
Don't really know how to write a review yet. more
This was not really about procrastination. I read about half of the book and stopped when I realized he wasn't going to get into anything. It's just a bunch of general statements. For example, do your most important task and get rid of the nonessential ones.

Who are all the people giving this book four and five stars? Did they really stop procrastinating as a result of this book?

The book is written in a confident, readable tone. I can see how someone reading this would start to feel like they are going to get it together now.

It's kind of like people are great in job interviews and make the interviewer feel like they can do the job. But actually they're not good at it at all.

He starts to give life advice too, for example by talking about setting goals. As if all you need to do to succeed is to write some goals down and make a list. As already stated, it's all very general and quite frankly just regurgitated ideas from other books.

Hollow and 100% filler.

He takes an "eat the frog analogy" and just repeats it. Doesn't develop it. If you've heard the saying before, you already know what's in this book. You're better off just contemplating on that image when you're trying to get out of a procrastination state.

more
Very easy to read and understand with valuable insights. I like how there are "eat that frog!" exercises after every chapter. This book can really help you stop procrastinating if you simply apply the knowledge found inside. Great book!more
Cool nice reading more
it's really small and intersting book to read for time managementmore
Eat That Frog is one of the best books ever written on personal management. Without using any management jargon, Brian Tracy simplistically summarises the best practices and provides action plans which are easy to understand and implement. A must read for all those who want to be more productive in every area of life. more
this in a small book with 60 plus pages but it has really helped me in organising my life. but its only possible when you take a pencil and diary and note the points and read one topic a day and apply it to yourself then step by step you move. one of best book on time management more
Brian Tracy certainly puts structure around the adage we've all been told, "How do you eat an elephant (or frog in this case)? Excellent theory and applicable "how to's".more
These are practical steps presented in a lucid manner for enjoyable reading and taking action immediately. One area of concern though is where the constraints to getting things done appear insurmountable at the moment and only time and patience can change the situation. There is also a trade off between speed or a sense of urgency and efficiency. Better be effective than be efficient, do the right things rather than do things right. Thank you.more
Has a lot of good tips, but i had the feeling to be reading the same, page after page :D !! I have implemented most of things in here!!
more
Read all 23 reviews

Reviews

This book has lots of good ideas for time management and goal setting. Though there wasn't really any new information, it was a really nice refresher. The chapters were pretty short, so I felt like I was making progress every time I picked up this book to read some. I like the idea of "eating the frog" first.

A few years ago, I mentioned this book (based only on what I read about it on Amazon or Barnes & Noble's website) during a short talk I gave at t Junior League board meeting about time management. I remember that the "eat the frog" part made several people chuckle. Now I wish I'd read the book beforehand, especially since I know now that it was a pretty quick read.more
Surprisingly non-awful. The closest thing to a motivational self-help book I want to read. Lots of good practical ideas, and it's short.more
I got to say when i looked as this very small book i was worried that was useless. But actually i read it in one hour and really liked the concise information. It is really a very good little book on ideas to help with procrastinationmore
The book has much good advice, but only when looked at from a high level: don’t procrastinate; don’t perform meaningless tasks, take a long-term view of your life. Tracy get to applying this very common wisdom he reveals his flawed biases. He claims, for example, his system is equally applicable to both professional and private life, when it’s really only helpful to people who work in white collar corporate settings. Here’s his problem: He believes that everyone has the ability to choose what they want to do next, and the problem with most people’s lives is that they routinely choose to perform low-value tasks like responding to emails instead of eating that frog and getting the biggest, ugliest, most high-value task out of the way first thing. Makes sense.This is, however, only helpful to people, like me, whose jobs are filled with so many meaningless tasks that I have the freedom to choose what I want to do next. I can routinely put off eating frogs and although I won’t get ahead in my profession, I won’t necessarily lose my job, either. If I had a real job (e.g., doctor, teacher, car mechanic, homemaker) I wouldn’t have the luxury of choosing what task I do next. Their client dictates it (e.g., I promised to fix their car, the sick person needs comfort, the baby’s diaper needs to be changed). People who have real jobs must routinely submit themselves to the actual needs of others, and have objective standards of performance they must live up to. People with real jobs don’t have the luxury to choose to eat that frog, because their clients constantly give them frogs throughout their workdays. (btw, preparing a spreadsheet or presentation for your boss is not submitting to someone’s needs nor does it have objective quality standards.)Debilitating procrastination only exists when your life is filled with a bunch of meaningless stuff to do. Since most of our white collar jobs are meaningless, this book is great for most people. But even there, encouraging people to master their sinking ships well isn’t really wise advice. In general, people don’t need to eat that frog every day, they need to find jobs where there’s nothing but frogs to eat.The details of his advice shouldn’t be helpful for your family life either since putting your own aspirations and desires first is not the way to live fully in personal relationships. Rather our lives should be directed through submission to the needs of others who come to us in need. (Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.)more
Read for a workshop. Didn't particularly find any new ideas, but they were certainly presented in a memorable way.more
A great simple book that summarizes what you need to do to be productive and successful.more
The basic premise of this book is that you take the least favourite task you have to do in a given day and do it first thing. Get it over with. Quite good advice if you can follow it. There's more similar advice in this book on goal setting, achieving objectives and so on, but it does all feel a bit unoriginal.more
Read it and you`ll see why i rated with 5 stars.more
One of the best book I've ever read!more
Don't really know how to write a review yet. more
This was not really about procrastination. I read about half of the book and stopped when I realized he wasn't going to get into anything. It's just a bunch of general statements. For example, do your most important task and get rid of the nonessential ones.

Who are all the people giving this book four and five stars? Did they really stop procrastinating as a result of this book?

The book is written in a confident, readable tone. I can see how someone reading this would start to feel like they are going to get it together now.

It's kind of like people are great in job interviews and make the interviewer feel like they can do the job. But actually they're not good at it at all.

He starts to give life advice too, for example by talking about setting goals. As if all you need to do to succeed is to write some goals down and make a list. As already stated, it's all very general and quite frankly just regurgitated ideas from other books.

Hollow and 100% filler.

He takes an "eat the frog analogy" and just repeats it. Doesn't develop it. If you've heard the saying before, you already know what's in this book. You're better off just contemplating on that image when you're trying to get out of a procrastination state.

more
Very easy to read and understand with valuable insights. I like how there are "eat that frog!" exercises after every chapter. This book can really help you stop procrastinating if you simply apply the knowledge found inside. Great book!more
Cool nice reading more
it's really small and intersting book to read for time managementmore
Eat That Frog is one of the best books ever written on personal management. Without using any management jargon, Brian Tracy simplistically summarises the best practices and provides action plans which are easy to understand and implement. A must read for all those who want to be more productive in every area of life. more
this in a small book with 60 plus pages but it has really helped me in organising my life. but its only possible when you take a pencil and diary and note the points and read one topic a day and apply it to yourself then step by step you move. one of best book on time management more
Brian Tracy certainly puts structure around the adage we've all been told, "How do you eat an elephant (or frog in this case)? Excellent theory and applicable "how to's".more
These are practical steps presented in a lucid manner for enjoyable reading and taking action immediately. One area of concern though is where the constraints to getting things done appear insurmountable at the moment and only time and patience can change the situation. There is also a trade off between speed or a sense of urgency and efficiency. Better be effective than be efficient, do the right things rather than do things right. Thank you.more
Has a lot of good tips, but i had the feeling to be reading the same, page after page :D !! I have implemented most of things in here!!
more
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