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From the Publisher

Inspiration Whenever You Need It

We have all experienced it: the jolt of an insight arriving like a thunderclap, unexpectedly and without warning. But what if insights could be accessed more reliably? Drawing on years of research, reflection, and experiences with colleagues, friends, and clients, Charles Kiefer and Malcolm Constable present a thorough, pragmatic approach for dependably generating fresh thoughts and perspectives. Guided by their user-friendly practices and helpful exercises (both in the book and online at www.TAOI-Online-Learning.com), you'll develop your own personal approach to cultivating a mindset where insights come so readily that new or long-standing problems are solved with confidence and ease.

“Creating insights isn't a magical process-this book provides a practical framework for generating insights for yourself and your organization. We've used many of these techniques with our innovation teams and they work.”
-Wayne Delker, Chief Innovation Officer and Senior Vice President, The Clorox Company

“Conventional wisdom holds insights to be elusive and mysterious. Kiefer and Constable turn conventional wisdom on its head with this marvelous addition to the libraries of all those devoted to improving the quality of their thinking.”
-Len Schlesinger, President, Babson College, and former Vice Chairman, Limited Brands

“In my forty-five years in business, I have found insights to be invaluable in strategy formulation and vital in forming best-in-class products and services. This book provides a simple road map of how to achieve such insights.”
-Dick Kovacevich, retired Chairman and CEO, Wells Fargo & Company
Published: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc. on
ISBN: 9781609948115
List price: $17.95
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