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From the Publisher

The Student Leadership Challenge: Facilitation and Activity Guide gives educators the flexible, modularized building blocks for teaching students how to apply Kouzes and Posner's Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership® as outlined in their best-selling book The Student Leadership Challenge .

The Facilitation and Activity Guide includes:

Language and guidance for teaching each leadership practice and its associated leadership behaviors Experiential, reflective, and film activities to bring each leadership practice to life Direction on using the Student Leadership Practices Inventory Advice for working with students using the Student Workbook and Personal Leadership Journal to help them deliberately practice, reflect, and commit to liberating the leader within Curriculum suggestions for various educational contexts

Praise for The Student Leadership Challenge: Facilitation and Activity Guide

"From what, to so what, and now what, this guide helps take educators on a journey of not only understanding The Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership but also specifically on how to apply, practice, and teach the nuances of these exemplary leadership ways of being." —Laura Osteen , professor of higher education, Florida State University, and director, Florida State's Center for Leadership and Civic Education

"The Facilitation and Activity Guide would have helped me not only to develop a better leadership program but to be a better leader myself. For those administering The Five Practices, this guide 'models the way' and will be one of your best coaches." —Sam Eriksmoen , former director, Emerging Leaders Program, University of North Dakota

"Educators working at all levels will benefit from this resource. It is practical, applicable to diverse sectors, and works." —Katie Burke , assistant director, L.E.A.D (Leadership Education & Development), Florida Atlantic University

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9781118602584
List price: $45.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Student Leadership Challenge by James M. Kouzes, Barr...
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