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Over the course of his legendary career, Harlan Ellison has defied—and sometimes defined—modern fantasy literature, all while refusing to allow any genre to claim him. A Grand Master of the Science Fiction Writers of America, winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Horror Writers Association as well as winner of countless awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, Edgar Allan Poe, and Bram Stoker, Ellison is as unpredictable as he is unique, irrepressible as he is infuriating.
 
Over thirty titles in Ellison’s brilliant catalog are now available in an elegant new package featuring Ellison himself. Genius never felt so combustible. Again, Dangerous Visions is the classic companion to the most essential science fiction anthology ever published, and includes forty-six original stories edited and with introductions by Harlan Ellison, featuring John Heidenry, Ross Rocklynne, Ursula K. Le Guin, Andrew J. Offutt, Gene Wolfe, Ray Nelson, Ray Bradbury, Chad Oliver, Edward Bryant, Kate Wilhelm, James B. Hemesath, Joanna Russ, Kurt Vonnegut, T. L. Sherred, K. M. O’Donnell (Barry N. Malzberg), H. H. Hollis, Bernard Wolfe, David Gerrold, Piers Anthony, Lee Hoffman, Gahan Wilson, Joan Bernott, Gregory Benford, Evelyn Lief, James Sallis, Josephine Saxton, Ken McCullough, David Kerr, Burt K. Filer, Richard Hill, Leonard Tushnet, Ben Bova, Dean Koontz, James Blish and Judith Ann Lawrence, A. Parra (y Figueredo), Thomas M. Disch, Richard A. Lupoff, M. John Harrison, Robin Scott, Andrew Weiner, Terry Carr, and James Tiptree Jr.

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on Apr 1, 2014
ISBN: 9781497604957
List price: $9.99
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Dangerous Visions by Harlan Ellison were a turning point in science fiction. Ellison sought out stories that broke the old mold of science fiction as pulp fiction and that made a social statement. It was so successful and won so many awards that a sequal, Again, Dangerous Visions was published. Unlike many sequals, this one lived up to the origianl.read more
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A long, long anthology, with quite a few good stories, and a few stories the inclusion of which left me baffled. Ellison's preface and introductions, which I had enjoyed in the original anthology, grew increasingly irritating here, and I gave up on reading them about halfway through. My favorite stories were all by women authors: Joanna Russ' superb "When It Changed" is perhaps the most effective feminist scifi I have ever read; the entries from Kate Wilhelm, James Tiptree, Jr, and Ursula Le Guin were also very strong. I can admire the ambition behind entries from Piers Anthony and Richard Lupoff, even if neither was completely successful.read more
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A mammoth achievement of speculative fiction. ADV is even better than its predecessor and makes it all the worse that The Last Dangerous Visions has not been published (over 40 years after it was promised). Overall, my tastes matched up with Ellison's and I really enjoyed his introductions. I was surprised to find several authors here I already read in ADV.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Dangerous Visions by Harlan Ellison were a turning point in science fiction. Ellison sought out stories that broke the old mold of science fiction as pulp fiction and that made a social statement. It was so successful and won so many awards that a sequal, Again, Dangerous Visions was published. Unlike many sequals, this one lived up to the origianl.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A long, long anthology, with quite a few good stories, and a few stories the inclusion of which left me baffled. Ellison's preface and introductions, which I had enjoyed in the original anthology, grew increasingly irritating here, and I gave up on reading them about halfway through. My favorite stories were all by women authors: Joanna Russ' superb "When It Changed" is perhaps the most effective feminist scifi I have ever read; the entries from Kate Wilhelm, James Tiptree, Jr, and Ursula Le Guin were also very strong. I can admire the ambition behind entries from Piers Anthony and Richard Lupoff, even if neither was completely successful.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A mammoth achievement of speculative fiction. ADV is even better than its predecessor and makes it all the worse that The Last Dangerous Visions has not been published (over 40 years after it was promised). Overall, my tastes matched up with Ellison's and I really enjoyed his introductions. I was surprised to find several authors here I already read in ADV.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read enough of these stories over the past couple of days to remind myself that I don’t really care for science fiction. Most science fiction writers that I have read write as if they are priests of a new religion. I don’t need any new religions. Now, there are a handful that I like – Philip K. Dick and William Gibson spring to mind. In terms of the old school, I enjoy some of Ray Bradbury’s stories as well. The Bradbury story (a poem, actually) in this anthology is unreadable, and I suspect that Bradbury gave it to Harlan Ellison just to get him to go away. In all honesty, the fact that Ellison compiled this volume makes me prejudiced against it to begin with. Ellison is an egomaniacal bore, and he insists on writing annoying introductions to each and every one of the 46 stories included in this volume. Each of the authors is also called upon –for reasons I can’t fathom - to provide an afterword for their story, some of which bear evidence that a certain amount of arm-twisting was involved. This anthology was apparently considered (by Ellison, at least) to be “cutting edge”. This seems to mean that the authors were free to use the F word and describe oversized alien genitalia (oh, thanks for that!).I don’t discount the idea that there are some treasures to be found in this anthology, but I’m not sure how deeply I want to dig around in the muck looking for them. If anyone ever reissues this, I would suggest changing the title to “Enough With The Dangerous Visions, Already”P.S. I usually write my reviews without looking at those of others beforehand. Pleased to see that someone else finds Ellison as irritating as I do.
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