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From the Publisher

Lazarus was his name, an evil which "rose from the dead" off a slave ship to control the Georgia plantation with fear and the obeah: the evil instruments of conjure. Does his evil and his anger extend beyond the grave beyond space and time? Elizabeth Franklin Jefferson, called "Frankie" by her friends, is a descendant of slave owners and sensitive to the world beyond. But now Frankie and her cousin, Julian, have awakened an evil long thought put to rest: Lazarus and his deadly obeah. Now everyone in Frankie's family has started to die--will Frankie be next? 
Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781497614215
List price: $4.99
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