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From the Publisher

Imagine life in an ironically magical world where 144,000 doors separate fiction from reality. A place that can hypnotize even the most grounded philosophy major and deliver a fantastical rhyme to his reason. A place where a best buddy resembles a shaggy carpet, and adventures surpass a boy's dreams...welcome to Castle Perilous. 
Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781497613539
List price: $6.99
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