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From the Publisher

Of the 17 million Americans who have diabetes, approximately 9.3 of that number are women. And it appears that number of women with diabetes is increasing each year. Diabetes is particularly difficult for women in large part due to the hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle, changes that affect blood sugar levels. As a consequence women with diabetes have higher rates of chest pain, heart attack, coronary heart disease and stroke. And women with diabetes face special challenges.

The Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes provides advice, tips, and research from a diverse community of women living with diabetes. It provides practical insight and references for the optimal management of diabetes from women living with the disease as well as doctors, nurses, nutritionists, and educators. Personal anecdotes from nearly one hundred women throughout the book reveal both the good and the bad of living with diabetes, including the frustration, sense of shame, sense of isolation as well as the capacity for strength and the opportunity for growth.

The Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes lets you know that you are not alone but rather it will make you feel like you are sitting in your favorite coffee shop with your friends who share the same disease.

Special Features of Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes include:

Personal anecdotes on a wide variety of topics are in every chapter Authentic advice from women living with diabetes Expert tips from female endocrinologists, educators, and nutritionists who are also living with diabetes Comprehensive in scope this books examines all the challenges and issues women with diabetes face Research and statistics are provided for each topic
Published: Demos Health on
ISBN: 9781617050701
List price: $16.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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