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From the Publisher

Liver Pathology: An Atlas and Concise Guide provides pathologists, hepatologists, gastroenterologists, residents and fellows in their respective fields with an up-to-date guide to the differential diagnosis, interpretation and diagnosis of liver specimens. The book guides the reader to understand common histologic patterns and key pathologic features of the more common liver disorders. Liver Pathology: An Atlas and Concise Guide contains over 600 high-quality color images demonstrating the histopathologic and immunohistichemical findings supported by concise text including frequently associated clinical findings, pathologic features (histology, immunohistochemistry, molecular studies), differential diagnoses, and key references.

Liver Pathology: An Atlas and Concise Guide provides the "fundamentals" of liver pathology in a straightforward, problem-oriented presentation of key points and typical differentials based on what you are likely to see.


Liver Pathology: An Atlas and Concise Guide includes


Focus on classic features that every pathologist is likely to see
Differential diagnoses presented in tables for efficient overview
Hundreds of high quality images selected to demonstrate key pathologic features and emphasize differential diagnosis
Selected references and review articles to lead the reader to further investigation when needed
Published: DemosMed on
ISBN: 9781933864945
List price: $139.00
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