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From the Publisher

The Psychic Vampire Codex is the first book to examine the phenomenon and experience of modern vampirism completely from the vampire’s perspective. A fellow psychic vampire writes in the foreword that Michelle Belanger’s system "introduced a breath of fresh air into the vampire subculture. It freed us to look at ourselves in a new light, and it also helped those outside our community to view us differently. No longer were we parasites or predators . . . we could use our inborn abilities to help people heal." Psychic vampires are people who prey on the vital, human life energies of others. They are not believed to be undead. They are mortal people whose need for energy metaphorically connects them to the life-stealing predators of vampire myth.

In The Psychic Vampire Codex, Michelle Belanger, author and psychic vampire, introduces readers to the fascinating system of energy work used by vampires themselves and provides the actual codex text widely used by the vampire community for instruction in feeding and other techniques. Belanger also examines the ethics of vampirism and offers readers methods of protection from vampires.

The Psychic Vampire Codex
explodes all preconceptions and myths about who and what psychic vampires really are and reveals a vital and profound spiritual tradition based on balance, rebirth, and an integral relationship with the spirit world.

Topics: Vampires, Magic, Psychic, Spirituality , Paganism, Psychological, Informative, and How-To Guides

Published: Red Wheel Weiser on
ISBN: 9781609251390
List price: $22.95
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