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On the one hand, we have traditional science, based on the premises of materialism, reductionism, and randomness, with a belief that reality consists solely of matter and energy, that everything can be measured in the laboratory or observed by a telescope. If it can’t, it doesn’t exist. On the other hand, we have traditional religious dogma concerning God that fails to take into account evolution, a 4.6 billion-year-old Earth, and the conflicting claims of the world’s religions.

In The God Theory, Bernard Haisch discards both these worldviews and proposes a theory that provides purpose for our lives while at the same time is completely consistent with everything we have discovered about the universe and life on Earth. To wit, Newton was right — there is a God — and wrong — this is not merely a material world. Haisch proposes that science will explain God and God will explain science. Consciousness is not a mere epiphenomenon of the brain; it is our connection to God, the source of all consciousness. Ultimately it is consciousness that creates matter and not vice versa. New discoveries in physics point to a background sea of quantum light underlying the universe. The God Theory offers a worldview that incorporates cutting-edge science and ancient mystical knowledge. This is nothing less than a revolution in our understanding.

Topics: Spirituality , Existentialism, Physics, Philosophical, Essays, and Cosmos

Published: Red Wheel Weiser on Apr 1, 2009
ISBN: 9781609250140
List price: $16.95
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Explanation by astrophysicist on why he finds it more reasonable to believe that matter is a product of consiciousness rather than consciousness being a product of matter. He appeals in part to the theory that the electromagnetic zero-point energy field is the primary cause of mass, a theory of which he is one of the two initial proponents. The book written for non-scientists is a fairly straight forward argument against the materialistic worldview that still dominates the thinking of most physicists and biologists.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm reading this more for the cogent explanations of scientific theory than for the theology, which I'm finding fairly trite and New Age-ish. I agree with his gut feelings, but not his conclusions, and I'm appalled that he considers Neale Donald Walsch, author of Conversations With God, as a formative influence on his beliefs.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Haisch is an astrophysicist with a discomfort regarding the idea of a meaningless universe, and a gift for explaining scientific theory in simple terms. He was raised a strict Catholic, but lasted through only a year of Seminary, after which his interests turned to science.Although he outgrew fundamentalist Christian beliefs, he’s never been able to embrace the impersonal universe pictured by most of his fellow scientists. Science today is based on the premises of materialism (the belief that reality consists solely of matter and energy), reductionism (the idea that complex things can be explained by breaking them down into constituent parts) and randomness (the conviction that all natural processes follow the laws of chance). Haisch begs to differ, arguing that the only logical conclusion of these assumptions is that an infinite number of universes exist, which he finds nonsensical and “morally repugnant.” He accepts current scientific theory as a given—such as the Big Bang, a 4.6 billion-year-old-earth, and evolution—but simply feels the evidence argues against random universes, and leans more toward an “infinite conscious intelligence.” This intelligence he labels God, for lack of a better name.The God Theory, then, is Haish’s attempt to answer fundamental questions about human nature in the light of modern science. It’s based on the simple premise that we are, quite literally, one with God, and God is, quite literally, one with us. His discussion leads to some fascinating and important corollaries:[1] The God of his theory cannot require anything from us for his own happiness.[2] The God of his theory cannot dislike, and certainly cannot hate, anything that we do or are.[3] The God of his theory will never punish us (forget about heaven and hell) because that would ultimately amount to self-punishment.Haish touches on cosmology and the inflation theory, the consciousness debate, the implications of quantum mechanics, the “zero-point field inertia hypothesis” (that one’s a mouthful) and more, but never treads where an inquisitive non-scientist can’t follow, as he lays out his argument for a purposeful universe.I found the book thought-provoking and a lot of fun.read more
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Explanation by astrophysicist on why he finds it more reasonable to believe that matter is a product of consiciousness rather than consciousness being a product of matter. He appeals in part to the theory that the electromagnetic zero-point energy field is the primary cause of mass, a theory of which he is one of the two initial proponents. The book written for non-scientists is a fairly straight forward argument against the materialistic worldview that still dominates the thinking of most physicists and biologists.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm reading this more for the cogent explanations of scientific theory than for the theology, which I'm finding fairly trite and New Age-ish. I agree with his gut feelings, but not his conclusions, and I'm appalled that he considers Neale Donald Walsch, author of Conversations With God, as a formative influence on his beliefs.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Haisch is an astrophysicist with a discomfort regarding the idea of a meaningless universe, and a gift for explaining scientific theory in simple terms. He was raised a strict Catholic, but lasted through only a year of Seminary, after which his interests turned to science.Although he outgrew fundamentalist Christian beliefs, he’s never been able to embrace the impersonal universe pictured by most of his fellow scientists. Science today is based on the premises of materialism (the belief that reality consists solely of matter and energy), reductionism (the idea that complex things can be explained by breaking them down into constituent parts) and randomness (the conviction that all natural processes follow the laws of chance). Haisch begs to differ, arguing that the only logical conclusion of these assumptions is that an infinite number of universes exist, which he finds nonsensical and “morally repugnant.” He accepts current scientific theory as a given—such as the Big Bang, a 4.6 billion-year-old-earth, and evolution—but simply feels the evidence argues against random universes, and leans more toward an “infinite conscious intelligence.” This intelligence he labels God, for lack of a better name.The God Theory, then, is Haish’s attempt to answer fundamental questions about human nature in the light of modern science. It’s based on the simple premise that we are, quite literally, one with God, and God is, quite literally, one with us. His discussion leads to some fascinating and important corollaries:[1] The God of his theory cannot require anything from us for his own happiness.[2] The God of his theory cannot dislike, and certainly cannot hate, anything that we do or are.[3] The God of his theory will never punish us (forget about heaven and hell) because that would ultimately amount to self-punishment.Haish touches on cosmology and the inflation theory, the consciousness debate, the implications of quantum mechanics, the “zero-point field inertia hypothesis” (that one’s a mouthful) and more, but never treads where an inquisitive non-scientist can’t follow, as he lays out his argument for a purposeful universe.I found the book thought-provoking and a lot of fun.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Quite readable, though written by a brilliant astrophysicist and colleague of Puthoff. The Theory is basically that God created the Universe as a way to experience Himself. Prior to the Big Bang, He was simply potential. Everything in the Universe, including us, is God, experiencing himself. This fits quite well with my own philosophical musings, and it solves the “if there is a God, why does He allow pain” conundrum. There are hints that we are capable of rather quite a bit more than science currently acknowledges. The book soundly trounces the Reductionist scientific establishment, the dogmatic believers in scientism who would rather believe that consciousness is simply a result of chemical interactions than admit the evidence of their own hearts. A book that deserves a much larger audience.
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