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From the Publisher

"Kingma deals with love so directly...that Coming Apart brings immediate comfort to anyone in pain." -LA Weekly

Next to the death of a loved one, the ending of a relationship is the most painful experience most people will ever go through. Coming Apart is a first-aid kit for getting through the ending. It is a tool that will enable you to live through the end of your relationship with your self esteem intact.

Daphne Rose Kingma, the undisputed expert on matters of the heart, explores the critical facets of relationship breakdowns:Love myths: why we are really in relationshipsThe life span of loveThe emotional and unconscious processes of partingHow to get through the endingHow to create a personal workbook for finding resolution

Originally published in 1987 and continuously in print since then, with more than half a million copies sold, Coming Apart has been an important resource for hundreds of thousands of readers experiencing the pain and stress of a break-up. For anyone going through the ending of a relationship Kingma is a caring, sensitive guide.

This re-packaged edition includes a new introduction by the author.

Published: Red Wheel Weiser on
ISBN: 9781609255466
List price: $16.95
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