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A saga about one of the oldest and most romantic enterprises in the land—America’s railroads—The Men Who Loved Trains introduces some of the most dynamic businessmen in America. Here are the chieftains who have run the railroads, including those who set about grabbing power and big salaries for themselves, and others who truly loved the industry.

As a journalist and associate editor of Fortune magazine who covered the demise of Penn Central and the creation of Conrail, Rush Loving often had a front row seat to the foibles and follies of this group of men. He uncovers intrigue, greed, lust for power, boardroom battles, and takeover wars and turns them into a page-turning story for readers.

Included is the story of how the chairman of CSX Corporation, who later became George W. Bush’s Treasury secretary, was inept as a manager but managed to make millions for himself while his company drifted in chaos. Men such as he were shy of scruples, yet there were also those who loved trains and railroading, and who played key roles in reshaping transportation in the northeastern United States. This book will delight not only the rail fan, but anyone interested in American business and history.

Published: Indiana University Press on May 21, 2006
ISBN: 9780253000644
List price: $24.99
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This is a good book to find out the railroads in the northeastern part of the United States merged together to become Penn Central. Penn Central foundred and became a government owned entity named Conrail (Consolidated Rail Corporation). Eventually Conrail was split up and taken over by CSX (successor to the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad) and Norfolk Southern (successor to the Norfolk and Western Railroad. Although the author never really describes it this way, a process that really began in the 1930's when the the two strongest Poconontas rairoads (C & O and the N & W) were urged to separately merge with the stongest eastern railroads, the New York Central and the Pennsylvania. Rush Loving is vrey good in tracking down the human element in all of this, not as good at seeing the sociological side of the story. But it is a story that needed to be written. I have not followed the story over the years as well as I should have, and Rush puts it all together quite well.read more
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Reviews

This is a good book to find out the railroads in the northeastern part of the United States merged together to become Penn Central. Penn Central foundred and became a government owned entity named Conrail (Consolidated Rail Corporation). Eventually Conrail was split up and taken over by CSX (successor to the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad) and Norfolk Southern (successor to the Norfolk and Western Railroad. Although the author never really describes it this way, a process that really began in the 1930's when the the two strongest Poconontas rairoads (C & O and the N & W) were urged to separately merge with the stongest eastern railroads, the New York Central and the Pennsylvania. Rush Loving is vrey good in tracking down the human element in all of this, not as good at seeing the sociological side of the story. But it is a story that needed to be written. I have not followed the story over the years as well as I should have, and Rush puts it all together quite well.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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