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From the Publisher

Medical journalist Stephanie Marohn eases the pain and trauma of addiction recovery in this guide, one in a series dealing with ailments such as anxiety and depression. In layman's terms she discusses how chemical imbalances in the brain create addiction and withdrawal symptoms, and how they can be restored. Suggestions include: amino acid supplements (to regulate sugar levels), herbs such as chamomile, valerian root (to relax the nervous system), acupuncture, aromatherapy, candle therapy, and so on. Marohn's view of addiction is clear enough to see the big picture, which encompasses everything from crippling drug addiction to minor, apparently harmless habits such as compulsive shopping. According to Marohn, addiction is a problem that effects over 100 million people every year, and needn't be seen as either freakish or a sign of "weakness." Furthermore, there is a way to recover that does not compromise a holistic lifestyle through pharmaceutical medicines, should one choose this path.

Published: Hampton Roads Publishing on
ISBN: 9781612832760
List price: $22.95
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