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A radio broadcaster and journalist for Edward R. Murrow at CBS, William Shirer was new to the world of broadcast journalism when he began keeping a diary while in Europe during the 1930s. It was in 1940, still a virtual unknown, that Shirer wondered whether his reminiscences of the collapse of the world around Nazi Germany could be of any interest or value as a book.

Shirer’s Berlin Diary, which is considered the first full record of what was happening in Germany during the rise of the Third Reich, first appeared in 1941. The book was an instant success. But how did Shirer get such a valuable firsthand account? He had anonymous sources willing to speak with him, provided their identity remained protected and disguised so as to avoid retaliation from the Gestapo. Shirer recorded his and others’ eyewitness views to the horror that Hitler was inflicting on his people in his effort to conquer Europe. Shirer continued his job as a foreign correspondent and radio reporter for CBS until Nazi press censors made it virtually impossible for him to do his job with any real accuracy. He left Europe, taking with him the invaluable, unforgettable (and horrific) contents of his Berlin Diary.

Berlin Diary brings the reader as close as any reporter has ever been to Hitler and the rise of the Third Reich. Shirer’s honest, lucid and passionate reporting of the brutality with which Hitler came to power and the immediate reactions of those who witnessed these events is for all time.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

William Shirer (1904-1993) was originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and was the first journalist hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a team of journalists for CBS radio. Shirer distinguished himself and quickly became known for his broadcasts from Berlin during the rise of the Nazi dictatorship through the first year of World War II. Shirer was the first of “Edward R. Murrow’s Boys” - broadcast journalists - who provided news coverage during World War II and afterward. It was Shirer who broadcast the first uncensored eyewitness account of the annexation of Austria. Shirer is best known for his books The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich which won the National Book Award and Berlin Diary.

Topics: World War II, Nazis, Adolf Hitler, German History, The Holocaust, War, Dark, Dramatic, Passionate, Gripping, Investigative Journalism, 1930s, 1940s, Germany, Berlin, Essays, and Transcribed Interviews

Published: RosettaBooks on Jan 1, 1970
ISBN: 9780795316982
List price: $9.99
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A detailed and first hand account of Germany during the rise of the Nazi party and Hitler. Detailed and very interesting, difficult to put down once you start.read more
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A must read for people who want to know the inside stories of Berlin during WWII. Absolutely wonderful. Shirer was a reporter in Berlin during this time.read more
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Excellent account of the conditions in Berlin leading up to WWII written in diary form by William Shirer correspondent for CBS. Mixing of world events, important figures and the common daily activities all make for a very readable slice of WWII history.read more
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A detailed and first hand account of Germany during the rise of the Nazi party and Hitler. Detailed and very interesting, difficult to put down once you start.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A must read for people who want to know the inside stories of Berlin during WWII. Absolutely wonderful. Shirer was a reporter in Berlin during this time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Excellent account of the conditions in Berlin leading up to WWII written in diary form by William Shirer correspondent for CBS. Mixing of world events, important figures and the common daily activities all make for a very readable slice of WWII history.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I've read this book twice now (and am considering a third time through). What fascinates me about this book is the immediacy, the electric current of "this is happening NOW" that runs through it. Yes, it's full of facts and observations of Germany during the rise of the Nazis, but it's also a glimpse into the life of a man creating a new form of communication -- the radio news broadcast, which Shirer is credited with practically inventing along with Edward R. Murrow. The highest recommendation I can give this book is that, both times that I read it, at the end I spend a few seconds worried about who would win WWII.
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Excellent. Fascinating account of the movement of Germany towards and into war - through the eyes of American radio correspondent. Particularly strong on immediate build up to war - Munich etc - and phoney war. Also interesting on censorship of the press, and lack of French resistance to German invasion.
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Diary of William L. Shirer in Berlin in the years leading up to the U.S. entrance into WW II. Interesting observations.
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