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Huxley’s bleak future prophesized in Brave New World was a capitalist civilization which had been reconstituted through scientific and psychological engineering, a world in which people are genetically designed to be passive and useful to the ruling class. Satirical and disturbing, Brave New World is set some 600 years ahead, in “this year of stability, A.F. 632”--the A.F. standing for After Ford, meaning the godlike Henry Ford. “Community, Identity, Stability,” is the motto. Reproduction is controlled through genetic engineering, and people are bred into a rigid class system. As they mature, they are conditioned to be happy with the roles that society has created for them. The rest of their lives are devoted to the pursuit of pleasure through sex, recreational sports, the getting and having of material possessions, and taking a drug called Soma. Concepts such as family, freedom, love, and culture are considered grotesque.

Against this backdrop, a young man known as John the Savage is brought to London from the remote desert of New Mexico. What he sees in the new civilization a “brave new world” (quoting Shakespeare’s The Tempest). However, ultimately, John challenges the basic premise of this society in an act that threatens and fascinates its citizens.

Huxley uses his entire prowess to throw the idea of utopia into reverse, presenting us what is known as the “dystopian” novel. When Brave New World was written (1931), neither Hitler nor Stalin had risen to power. Huxley saw the enduring threat to society from the dark side of scientific and social progress, and mankind’s increasing appetite for simple amusement. Brave New World is a work that indicts the idea of progress for progress sake and is backed up with force and reason.

Published: RosettaBooks on
ISBN: 9780795311253
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    This is one of my favourite books.more
    This book inspired my decision to stay away from happy meds as much as I could... it's a treasure to our society and, I believe, an inspiration for many of the great dystopian stories we are receiving in YA lit today.  more
    Brave New World is pretty easy to read and get along with, for a dystopian novel, and there are some pretty good quotes. For the most part I didn't think the prose was exceptional, but it was functional and got the story told.

    There were several things that bugged me about it, though. The first thing is the characters -- I'm all about characters in my reading, and if I don't connect with a book, it's likely because I didn't get on with the characters. Brave New World doesn't really have any characters I really got to like. Those that are 'civilised' are too conditioned, too vapid, and the 'savages' are too... intense, partially just by comparison. The focus on pain and self-denial in the 'savage' society is as difficult to get behind as the unthinking, unindividuality of the 'civilised' society. Which is basically the other problem I have: that there are only two extremes. That's partially covered by the misfits who get sent off to live on islands, but not really.

    The message about what constitutes humanity, what is really living, is good, though. "But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."

    Pretty much.more
    I wanted to love this book, really I did. I have always heard such wonderful things about it, and I love this genre, but it was just all right for me.more
    Read all 224 reviews

    Reviews

    This is one of my favourite books.more
    This book inspired my decision to stay away from happy meds as much as I could... it's a treasure to our society and, I believe, an inspiration for many of the great dystopian stories we are receiving in YA lit today.  more
    Brave New World is pretty easy to read and get along with, for a dystopian novel, and there are some pretty good quotes. For the most part I didn't think the prose was exceptional, but it was functional and got the story told.

    There were several things that bugged me about it, though. The first thing is the characters -- I'm all about characters in my reading, and if I don't connect with a book, it's likely because I didn't get on with the characters. Brave New World doesn't really have any characters I really got to like. Those that are 'civilised' are too conditioned, too vapid, and the 'savages' are too... intense, partially just by comparison. The focus on pain and self-denial in the 'savage' society is as difficult to get behind as the unthinking, unindividuality of the 'civilised' society. Which is basically the other problem I have: that there are only two extremes. That's partially covered by the misfits who get sent off to live on islands, but not really.

    The message about what constitutes humanity, what is really living, is good, though. "But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."

    Pretty much.more
    I wanted to love this book, really I did. I have always heard such wonderful things about it, and I love this genre, but it was just all right for me.more
    An amazingly good book. I have to say I definitively wouldn't like to live in a world like that, but somehow I see how the world is coming to this so called "happiness" which makes me a bit sick. Huxley has an amazing way of showing you different perspectives of the same situation, and I enjoyed the final chapters when you see what happens with each character and you get to understand a bit more about this strange "happy" world.more
    good but for all the sexismmore
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